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NEWS
September 27, 1991 | Associated Press
A New York correspondent for Pravda, once the powerful voice of the Communist Party in the Soviet Union, has packed his bags and gone home. The reason? He ran out of money. Vladimir Sukhoi got paid in dollars, something Pravda doesn't have much of these days. The newspaper's assets--like all the suspended party's holdings--were frozen after the failed coup against Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev while investigators try to determine the party's wealth.
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BUSINESS
August 8, 2002 | From Bloomberg News
Citigroup Inc. Chairman Sanford Weill, under pressure from lawmakers to reveal more about the company's business dealings, said Wednesday that the firm will require corporate clients to make off-balance-sheet partnerships public. The financial services giant also said it will begin accounting for its stock options as an expense.
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NEWS
April 15, 1990 | VICKI TORRES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One Colorado project supporters hope that the announcement of a construction loan of more than $67 million and the entry of a Japanese financial partner reportedly willing to pay more than $13 million to join the project will finally put an end to rumors plaguing the development. For months, speculation about financial backing being withdrawn swirled around one of developer Douglas Stitzel's partners, Berisford Pasadena Ltd., a subsidiary of the giant English company, Berisford International.
BUSINESS
January 2, 1999 | From Reuters
Eleven European nations ditched their currencies Friday to launch the new shared euro, triggering a military-style operation in banks and brokerages as the financial sector geared up for the euro's market debut. The birth of the euro at the stroke of the New Year gave nearly 300 million Europeans a single currency that should rival the U.S. dollar in importance. On the streets of Europe, the new arrival was greeted with a mixture of horror, hope and indifference.
BUSINESS
August 8, 2002 | From Bloomberg News
Citigroup Inc. Chairman Sanford Weill, under pressure from lawmakers to reveal more about the company's business dealings, said Wednesday that the firm will require corporate clients to make off-balance-sheet partnerships public. The financial services giant also said it will begin accounting for its stock options as an expense.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 1995 | STEPHANIE BROMMER
A San Fernando Valley businessman and a top aide to Assemblywoman Paula Boland (R-Granada Hills) are leading a field of six candidates in cash and loan contributions in their bid to succeed Boland in a legislative district that includes Simi Valley and Fillmore. Businessman Ross Hopkins has raised $74,239 in contributions, including $49,000 in loans, according to campaign finance statements. He had $66,295 left in the bank at the end of June.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1990
A small Torrance political action committee has paid a $300 city fine for failing to file campaign finance reports, but leaders of the group say they believe the City Clerk should have notified them of the filing rules. Frank Rizzardi, treasurer of the Protect Our Property Committee, said he paid the fine last week. "I told them we were paying it with great reluctance," Rizzardi said.
NEWS
May 17, 1989 | DAN MORAIN and RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writers
As the U.S. Justice Department nears a decision on whether to indict him, a federal judge filed a new financial disclosure report on Tuesday suggesting that he had previously misreported a controversial loan. U.S. District Judge Robert P. Aguilar reported in his latest disclosure that he received a $12,000 loan from Ronald V. Cloud, a former Nevada casino owner, not $10,000 as he reported last year. Aguilar, 58, continued to report that the unsecured loan is due upon his death and payable by his estate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 1989 | RICH CONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The state attorney general's office on Thursday sued Juanita St. John, the head of a beleaguered Los Angeles-Africa trade task force, for refusing to publicly disclose how the nonprofit, city-funded corporation has spent hundreds of thousands of dollars. The unusual lawsuit charges that St. John and her Task Force for Africa-Los Angeles Relations are four years delinquent in filing state-mandated reports detailing the group's finances.
NEWS
May 18, 1991 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Reflecting a sour economy and unparalleled demands for state services, California's budget deficit has grown to at least $14.4 billion, a jump of nearly $2 billion since the last official estimates, legislative sources said Friday. Gov. Pete Wilson and his budget advisers spent most of the day in meetings mapping out plans to deal with the new development, but released no details.
BUSINESS
June 17, 1998 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
General Automation Inc. said Tuesday its auditors have withdrawn the Irvine software support service company's financial reports for the 1995, 1996 and 1997 fiscal years because of internal accounting errors. Price Waterhouse LLP, the company's former auditor, withdrew its 1995 and 1996 reports. McGladrey & Pullen LLP, General Automation's current accountant, has pulled its 1997 report.
NEWS
June 6, 1997 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin went high-tech this week and put his own page on the World Wide Web--but it may be more notable for what it leaves out than for what it reveals. With pictures of the Kremlin and the traditional double-headed eagle of Russia decorating his Web site, Yeltsin takes a step toward the era of political disclosure and divulges tidbits about his real estate holdings, official perks and luxury travel.
BUSINESS
February 11, 1997 | PATRICE APODACA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Personal bankruptcy filings in Orange County jumped 19% in 1996, propelled by rising credit card debt and the destigmatization of bankruptcy, a new study found. But Orange County, which has staged a stronger economic recovery than most other areas of the state, fared much better than Los Angeles County and California as a whole. Led by a record level of personal bankruptcy filings in Los Angeles County, the number of Californians seeking court protection from creditors skyrocketed 35% last year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 1995 | JOHN SCHWADA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A state political watchdog agency Thursday levied an $808,000 fine--the highest of its kind in state history--against an anti-gun control group for failing to adequately report its campaign finances as it worked to oust former state Sen. David Roberti from office in 1994. Named in the record-breaking fine by the state Fair Political Practices Commission was Californians Against Corruption, a South Bay organization that led a fight to recall Roberti, and two of the group's treasurers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 1995 | STEPHANIE BROMMER
A San Fernando Valley businessman and a top aide to Assemblywoman Paula Boland (R-Granada Hills) are leading a field of six candidates in cash and loan contributions in their bid to succeed Boland in a legislative district that includes Simi Valley and Fillmore. Businessman Ross Hopkins has raised $74,239 in contributions, including $49,000 in loans, according to campaign finance statements. He had $66,295 left in the bank at the end of June.
NEWS
July 12, 1995 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The nuclear arms race has cost the United States nearly $4 trillion, a staggering financial toll that was never disclosed to the American public, according to a major study unveiled Tuesday by the Brookings Institution. The study attacks the Cold War wisdom that nuclear weapons provided the nation with a cheap way to deter its enemies after detonation of the first atomic bomb 50 years ago this Sunday in New Mexico.
BUSINESS
November 6, 1990 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To borrow from Charles Dickens, these are the best of times and the worst of times for BSD Bancorp, the parent company of Bank of San Diego, Coast Bank and American Valley Bank. The bank holding company recently reported its third consecutive quarter of record profits; non-performing loans at BSD's banks are a respectable 1.9% of total loans, and Findley Reports, a Brea-based bank consulting firm, recently described BSD's banks as "premiere performers."
BUSINESS
June 17, 1991 | From Associated Press
The tottering Bank of New England in Boston turned to its sister bank, Connecticut Bank & Trust Co. in Hartford, for billions in emergency loans in late 1989, according to a House Banking Committee report. The newly released report details the events that brought down both the Boston and Hartford banks and their parent company, Bank of New England Corp. last January.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 1994 | DANIELLE A. FOUQUETTE
A report showing that the district was in good financial shape as of Oct. 31 brought little cheer to the Placentia-Yorba Linda Unified School District Board of Trustees this week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 1994 | MACK REED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
City council and school board candidates in Thousand Oaks and Simi Valley filed campaign finance statements Wednesday, including one by a young dark horse who disclosed a huge contribution. Michael V. Friedman, 27, reported receiving $12,750 from the Thousand Oaks Auto Mall Assn., plus $250 from Nesen Motor Car Co. in his bid for one of three Thousand Oaks council seats.
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