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NEWS
September 12, 1993 | Associated Press
About 200 journalists at a conference attended by Atty. Gen. Janet Reno left a banquet room coughing in the middle of dinner Saturday night. Security officials escorted Reno out of the room after the coughing fits broke out at the National Conference of Editorial Writers dinner, although she was not afflicted. No one sought medical attention. Hotel officials examined air ducts in an effort to find the cause. Later, they moved the journalists back into the room so they could finish their dinner.
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NEWS
February 11, 2010 | Noam Levey, Tribune Newspapers
As the nation struggled last year with rising healthcare costs and a recession, the five largest health insurance companies racked up combined profits of $12.2 billion -- up 56% over 2008, according to a new report by liberal healthcare activists. Based on company financial reports for 2009 filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission, the report said, insurers WellPoint Inc., UnitedHealth Group, Cigna Corp., Aetna Inc. and Humana Inc. covered 2.7 million fewer people than they did the year before.
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BUSINESS
June 6, 1990 | RONALD E. ROEL, NEWSDAY
A team of government and university researchers has concluded that there is a "significant association" between typing at computer keyboards at Newsday and New York Newsday and the incidence of repetitive-strain injuries--widespread occupational illnesses resulting from repeated motions. The yearlong study of Newsday employees, conducted by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and the University of Michigan, found no one cause responsible for the injuries.
WORLD
May 8, 2008 | Marcelo Sosa and Patrick J. McDonnell, Special to The Times
This Patagonian winter resort town wears a mantle of white in the South American autumn. But it's not from early snows. Ash from the Chaiten volcano across the Andes in Chile has been falling on the Argentine side of the border since the volcano erupted last week -- its first eruption in thousands of years. The onslaught of ash has yet to cause evacuations on the Argentine side, as it has in Chile.
NEWS
July 8, 1991 | Lanie Jones
SKATERS' BLUES: In their high-topped, neon-laced, in-line skates, they race around corners, on beachfront walks . . . and into emergency rooms. Doctors at Hoag Hospital in Newport Beach and UCI Medical Center in Orange report an increase in skating injuries, including concussions, cuts and broken bones. . . . "People are going very fast without realizing it," warns Hoag's Dr. Greg Super. " . . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Though bare feet are not likely to show up in offices or schools any time soon, going shoeless is healthier for the feet, according to an article published in a medical journal. "Studies of non-shoe-wearing populations in Africa and Asia conclude that people who do not wear shoes have healthier feet, fewer deformities and have greater mobility than people in shoe-wearing societies," said Lynn Staheli, an orthopedist at Children's Hospital in Seattle.
NEWS
July 26, 1990 | TAMMERLIN DRUMMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid all the brouhaha over smoking, there are people such as Gordon Carter. Carter operates The Towers restaurant, a popular oceanfront spot with a post card view of the Pacific Ocean. He is sympathetic to the concerns of nonsmokers, but he finds himself in an untenable position as government orders him to set aside more and more seats for nonsmokers. So, who gets the ocean view? The smokers or the nonsmokers?
WORLD
November 25, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
A new study calls for wine bottles to carry public health warnings to combat alcohol abuse. The report, drawn up for the Health Ministry, says alcoholism affects one in 10 people in France and that wine bottles should carry labels similar to those on cigarette packs. It also calls on the government to provide better information to young people about the risks of alcohol.
NATIONAL
July 15, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
The percentage of American children without health insurance has dropped by more than one-fifth since 1997, largely because of the State Children's Health Insurance Program, the government reports. The program covers those in poor families who earn too much to qualify for Medicaid. The number of children lacking health insurance fell from 13.9% in 1997 to 10.8% in 2001, according to a report by the Health and Human Services Department.
WORLD
November 25, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
A new study calls for wine bottles to carry public health warnings to combat alcohol abuse. The report, drawn up for the Health Ministry, says alcoholism affects one in 10 people in France and that wine bottles should carry labels similar to those on cigarette packs. It also calls on the government to provide better information to young people about the risks of alcohol.
BUSINESS
October 17, 2005 | From Reuters
General Motors Corp. and the United Auto Workers negotiated through the weekend over GM's plan to cut healthcare costs and could announce an agreement as soon as today, an industry analyst said. GM, the world's largest automaker, and the union have been in talks for months over GM's aim to reduce annual healthcare costs, which are estimated to rise to $5.6 billion in 2005 from $5.2 billion in 2004. GM announces quarterly results today.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 2004 | Kenneth R. Weiss, Times Staff Writer
Salmon raised in ocean feedlots, the main source of supply for American consumers, contains such high levels of PCBs, dioxins and other toxic chemicals that people should not eat it more than once a month, according to an extensive study reported today in the journal Science. The study, which has triggered heated protests from the industry, focused on commercially raised salmon in both the Atlantic and Pacific.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 2003 | Lisa Richardson, Times Staff Writer
Most California senior citizens report that they are in good health, but elderly Latinos and others who speak limited English say they have more health complications and poorer access to care than their peers, according to a comprehensive state survey. The report by the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research examines physical and mental ailments, insurance coverage and access to culturally appropriate services for the state's 3.6 million people age 65 and over. The report, "The Health of Older Californians," was commissioned by the California Endowment, a health-care philanthropy, and partially funded by the Archstone Foundation.
BUSINESS
August 30, 2002 | From Associated Press
The recession cost California 63,000 jobs, but the worst is over, according to a state report released Thursday. Job growth is averaging 1,500 new positions a month this year, contrasted with losses of 2,200 a month in 2001. Next year, the state could see job growth of 2% above its existing 14.7 million nonfarm jobs, according to the Employment Development Department report. The state is expected to add about 3.2 million jobs by 2010.
NATIONAL
July 15, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
The percentage of American children without health insurance has dropped by more than one-fifth since 1997, largely because of the State Children's Health Insurance Program, the government reports. The program covers those in poor families who earn too much to qualify for Medicaid. The number of children lacking health insurance fell from 13.9% in 1997 to 10.8% in 2001, according to a report by the Health and Human Services Department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 2000 | ANDREW BLANKSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Reflecting growing concern over the safety of local drinking water, the Los Angeles City Council on Tuesday ordered city water officials to issue a public report on the findings of a task force examining chromium 6 in drinking water. "We are dealing with a subject that none of us knows all the answers to," said Councilman Hal Bernson. "We need to listen anytime there is concern."
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