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Reporters Iraq

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NEWS
January 19, 1991 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After nearly 48 relentless hours of surgical cruise missile strikes and bombing runs, Baghdad resembles a ghost town, its inhabitants having fled or in hiding, its sprawling residential districts largely intact but empty.
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NATIONAL
April 13, 2010 | By Tina Susman
The nonprofit investigative news organization ProPublica won a Pulitzer Prize on Monday for its detailed look at the actions of an overwhelmed staff at a New Orleans hospital during Hurricane Katrina, underscoring the growing impact of nontraditional business models in the struggling newspaper industry. The majority of Pulitzers went to mainstream newspapers -- the Washington Post won four and the New York Times won three. ProPublica's investigative reporting win for a story by Sheri Fink was co-published by the New York Times Magazine.
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BUSINESS
February 9, 1991 | MICHAEL CIEPLY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The book business has a message for Cable News Network's Peter Arnett: "Phone home." Arnett, who has stirred controversy with his dramatic if heavily censored reports from bomb-plagued Baghdad, is suddenly one of the publishing industry's hottest commodities--in absentia. Hungry editors and agents are convinced that an uncensored, no-holds-barred book by the veteran war correspondent would be an enormous seller both in the United States and abroad. "He's perfect. He's right there.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2010 | James Rainey
America met Baghdad at the outset of the 1991 Gulf War with CNN correspondent Peter Arnett's live coverage from atop the Al Rasheed Hotel. A dozen years later, the beginning of another American war in Iraq came to us largely from reporters broadcasting live from another hotel, the Palestine. Those hotels -- complete with correspondents in the eerie light of antiaircraft fire -- have become landmarks in our collective memory. But the hotel that captured, or at least housed, the collective soul of a generation of correspondents in Iraq's wars was a stubbier, scruffier cousin, the Al Hamra.
NEWS
January 17, 1991 | RICK DU BROW, TIMES TELEVISION WRITER
The sounds of gunfire burst onto American television Wednesday as Cable News Network dominated extraordinary live coverage of air strikes that launched the U.S.-led war against Iraq. The air raids began about 3:30 p.m. Los Angeles time in the expected action after Iraqi President Saddam Hussein refused to obey a U.N. mandate to pull his forces out of Kuwait.
NEWS
January 26, 1991 | HOWARD ROSENBERG, TIMES TELEVISION CRITIC
The experience level of many TV reporters covering the Persian Gulf conflict is something the networks shouldn't want to brag about. While observing some of these foreign correspondents enlightening us on the air war (CNN Jerusalem correspondent Linda Scherzer was an NBC News intern less than three years ago, for example), it occurs that perhaps we should be enlightening them. Nonetheless, there are dramatic exceptions.
NEWS
February 10, 1991
The CABLE NEWS NETWORK said it has allowed Iraqi officials to use its satellite telephone in Baghdad, but only for limited purposes involving visas for journalists to enter Iraq. Ed Turner, CNN executive vice president, in a statement from the firm's headquarters in Atlanta, confirmed an Austrian radio report that CNN allowed Iraqi Information Ministry officials to use the phone to call the Jordanian capital to arrange visas for journalists. Baghdad has been subjected to heavy bombing by the U.
NEWS
January 26, 1991 | DENNIS McDOUGAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cable News Network, whose Peter Arnett is the one remaining U.S. correspondent in Baghdad, Friday was trying to obtain visas for five more staffers to join him. ABC and NBC said they are seeking to get personnel into the Iraqi capital as well.
NEWS
January 12, 1991 | Associated Press
NBC and CNN said Friday that their news crews will stay in Baghdad as long as they're allowed to, despite the evacuation of foreigners from the Iraqi capital. CBS was considering the matter, and ABC would not comment. An estimated 200 Americans, including 40 journalists, remained in Baghdad on Friday, four days before the Jan. 15 deadline for Iraq to leave Kuwait or face attack from a U.S.-led military alliance. NBC has six people in Baghdad, and Cable News Network has seven.
NEWS
February 27, 1991 | PAUL DEAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One Peter Arnett is in a pillory. He's an enemy sympathizer, said the senator. A double agent and turncoat, said the movie stars. Definitely the propaganda voice of Baghdad, claimed others. Arnett says it is all in the eyes of the political perceiver. "I mean, one man's information is another man's propaganda," explains the CNN newsman who reported the first crack of war over Baghdad--then remained when others left.
WORLD
December 1, 2008 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
An American journalist for National Public Radio and three Iraqi colleagues escaped injury Sunday when a bomb attached to their car exploded as it was parked along a street in west Baghdad. Ivan Watson, a 33-year-old reporter for NPR on temporary assignment in Iraq, said he had gone to interview people in a cafe a few yards from an Iraqi army checkpoint. Watson, who is normally based in Istanbul, Turkey, was accompanied by producer and translator Ali Hamdani and two drivers.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 2007 | Marjorie Miller, Times Staff Writer
As U.S. tanks rolled into Baghdad and the statue of Saddam Hussein came down in April 2003, reporters on the ground quickly realized that they were not witnessing the unbridled joy on the part of Iraqis they had seen at the fall of the Taliban in Afghanistan. Instead, the journalists encountered a mix of cheers and trepidation that turned out to be a harbinger of the future. An ophthalmologist standing beside Cox Newspapers' Larry Kaplow complained about the small American flags attached to the tank antennas.
WORLD
October 16, 2007 | Christian Berthelsen, Times Staff Writer
Five Iraqi journalists were killed in three separate attacks this weekend, marking the deadliest day for reporters covering the country in a year. Four reporters for Iraqi newspapers were reported shot to death Sunday in ambushes near Kirkuk in northern Iraq. Previously reported was the death of Salih Saif Aldin, a correspondent for the Washington Post who was apparently shot to death Sunday too while on assignment in the Sadiya neighborhood of southwest Baghdad.
NATIONAL
October 3, 2007 | Noam N. Levey, Times Staff Writer
Unable to force President Bush to speed up the withdrawal of U.S. troops from Iraq, House Democrats settled Tuesday for a less controversial measure to require more reports on plans to pull forces out. But in an indication of the debate within Democratic ranks about how to challenge Bush's wartime leadership, three senior House members also threatened to hold up funding for the war and proposed a tax to pay for it. Democratic Reps. David R. Obey of Wisconsin, John P.
NATIONAL
September 17, 2007
Friday's White House report on progress in Iraq capped two months of major government assessments. Here is a summary of the major documents as well as earlier government reports, not including military or congressional reports. For links to the full text of these reports, visit latimes.com/iraqreports White House Benchmark Assessment Report (Sept. 14) Iraqis are making satisfactory progress toward nine of 18 benchmarks, an improvement from July, when one benchmark showed such progress.
NATIONAL
September 5, 2007 | Paul Richter, Times Staff Writer
As Congress opened a monthlong showdown with President Bush over Iraq, Senate war critics on Tuesday demanded evidence that the security improvements claimed by the White House could be sustained once American forces hand off the task of maintaining order to Iraqi military units. Establishing a theme likely to be repeated during upcoming hearings, Democratic senators pressed the nation's senior legislative analyst for indications that security gains could last. But David M.
NEWS
January 19, 1991 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Jordanian government reopened its border with Iraq on Friday, inviting a refugee exodus fraught with danger in the middle of a war. Nine days after closing the crossing for lack of international financial support, Jordan announced that it would take in refugees of all nationalities fleeing Iraq and Kuwait. Jordanian officials estimated that more than a million people might make the run for the border.
NEWS
February 1, 1991 | From Associated Press
A British reporter was jailed in Baghdad when the war began, forced to strip and kept in a small cell without food or bathroom facilities, he said in a report published Thursday. Bruce Cheesman wrote in the Evening Standard that he spent three days in a Baghdad jail, then was held in a hotel until being permitted to cross into Jordan nearly two weeks later. He said he heard the bombing of Baghdad start at about 2:30 a.m. Jan. 17 and left his hotel to find a telephone to file his report.
WORLD
August 30, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Congressional auditors have determined that the Iraqi government has failed to meet a majority of political and military goals laid out by lawmakers to assess President Bush's Iraq war strategy, according to three officials familiar with the matter. The Government Accountability Office, Congress' investigative arm, will report that at least 13 of the 18 benchmarks to measure success remain unfulfilled before a Sept.
WORLD
August 24, 2007 | Greg Miller, Times Staff Writer
Despite some military progress, Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri Maliki is unable to govern his country effectively and the political situation is likely to become even more precarious in the next six to 12 months, the nation's intelligence agencies concluded in a new assessment released Thursday. The document, an update of a National Intelligence Estimate delivered in January, represents the view of all 16 U.S. spy agencies.
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