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NEWS
August 21, 1996
Tsutakiyokomatsu Asaji, 102, believed to be Japan's oldest geisha. Born Haru Kato, Asaji spent nearly 90 years as a geisha, a word literally meaning "arts person." She had continued performing the refined songs and dances of geisha tradition until April, when illness forced her to retire. Westerners usually think of a geisha as a prostitute.
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WORLD
May 6, 2009 | Associated Press
Japan, which designates every May 5 as Children's Day, had fewer children to celebrate the holiday for the 28th straight year, underscoring a demographic shift that could eventually wreak havoc on the world's second-largest economy. A government report released this week says the number of children younger than 15 as of April 1 had fallen to about 17 million. Japan's proportion of children -- which has been declining for 35 years -- now stands at just 13% of the country's 128 million people.
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BUSINESS
October 14, 1991 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two years ago Hideji Takemasa, a 34-year-old designer at NEC Corp., was asked to design an anti-gravity personal computer for a futuristic exhibit on space travel. He came up with a totally new concept: A computer built into a soft rubber wristband with a reduced-size keyboard and a built-in laser scanner.
WORLD
May 11, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
China offered to repair damage protesters did to Japan's embassy in Beijing, Kyodo News agency said. Foreign Minister Li Zhaoxing also offered to repair Japan's consulate in Shanghai and its ambassador's Beijing residence, Kyodo said. It said Li made the offer to Japanese Senior Vice Foreign Minister Ichiro Aisawa. Protesters threw rocks and broke windows in demonstrations against Japan's campaign for a permanent U.N.
BUSINESS
September 25, 1991 | From Reuters
Japanese companies have repeatedly withheld or delayed selling their best technology to American companies, leaving the U.S. firms at a disadvantage in world markets, the U.S. General Accounting Office said in a report Tuesday. The watchdog agency said U.S. firms were concerned that "even a brief delay in obtaining a part or piece of equipment can cause a company to fall a generation behind in its technological capabilities, resulting in lost market share." Sen. Lloyd Bentsen (D-Tex.
BUSINESS
August 13, 2004 | From Bloomberg News
Japan's real gross domestic product expanded at a less-than-expected 1.7% annualized pace in the three months ended June 30, signaling that a rebound in the world's second-biggest economy may have peaked, analysts said. The growth rate reported by the Cabinet Office in Tokyo early today compared with a 4.2% median forecast of 32 economists surveyed by Bloomberg News and was a sharp decline from the 6.6% pace of the first quarter.
NEWS
August 21, 1985 | United Press International
French deep-sea explorers who took part in a 42-day submarine mission with Japan said the project yielded significant clues to the origin of Japanese earthquakes. The 12-man team of geophysicists from both countries gathered rock and animal samples to study methane gas production as far as 19,683 feet below the surface on the ocean floor near Japan. Xavier Le Pichon, scientific director of the project, said Monday that methane gas explosions may be the cause of Japan's frequent earthquakes.
BUSINESS
November 1, 1985
Boosted by a record number of motor vehicles sold overseas, Japan logged a $29-billion trade surplus in the first half of fiscal 1985--its largest six-month surplus ever, according to Finance Ministry figures. Japan's trade surplus with the United States was $36.8 billion last year and is predicted to top $47 billion this year. The Finance Ministry credited rising exports and declining imports for the $29.26-billion trade surplus registered in the April-to-September period this year.
BUSINESS
February 29, 2000 | From Bloomberg News
Some automatic teller machines in Japan stopped working and the Meteorological Agency reported glitches in its computers today because of disruptions some computer programmers were attributing to the extra day in February this year. Japan's Ministry of Posts said that as many as 1,200 of its 25,000 ATM machines stopped working. The ministry, which is investigating, said it hasn't determined whether the stoppage was caused by the Feb. 29 critical date. The ministry said that as of 10:40 a.m.
BUSINESS
April 1, 1994 | From Reuters
The United States released its annual hit list of world trade barriers Thursday, and singled out Japan for special criticism. The trade office was quick to point out that the report had taken on "added significance" this year since President Clinton has revived a dormant sanctions tool.
BUSINESS
August 13, 2004 | From Bloomberg News
Japan's real gross domestic product expanded at a less-than-expected 1.7% annualized pace in the three months ended June 30, signaling that a rebound in the world's second-biggest economy may have peaked, analysts said. The growth rate reported by the Cabinet Office in Tokyo early today compared with a 4.2% median forecast of 32 economists surveyed by Bloomberg News and was a sharp decline from the 6.6% pace of the first quarter.
NEWS
June 24, 2001 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mae Whitman and Alia Shawkat just had the grooviest time playing two friends growing up in 1965 in the new Fox Family Channel series "State of Grace," which premieres Monday on the cable network. For 13-year-old Whitman and 12-year-old Shawkat, one of the coolest things about turning the clock back to the swinging '60s was the vintage-style candy they got to eat, such as candy cigarettes. "Mae and I loved them," enthuses Shawkat, who was seen in "Three Kings." "It was so much fun," echoes Whitman, seen in "One Fine Day" and "Hope Floats."
BUSINESS
May 30, 2000 | From Reuters
Japan got welcome glimmers of hope today in two of the bleakest areas of its struggling economy, with a surprise increase in personal spending and a drop in the unemployment rate from a record high. Spending by wage earners' households climbed 3.6% in real terms in April from a year earlier, only its second rise in nine months, while joblessness slipped a notch from its February and March highs to 4.8%.
BUSINESS
February 29, 2000 | From Bloomberg News
Some automatic teller machines in Japan stopped working and the Meteorological Agency reported glitches in its computers today because of disruptions some computer programmers were attributing to the extra day in February this year. Japan's Ministry of Posts said that as many as 1,200 of its 25,000 ATM machines stopped working. The ministry, which is investigating, said it hasn't determined whether the stoppage was caused by the Feb. 29 critical date. The ministry said that as of 10:40 a.m.
BUSINESS
April 1, 1998 | From Associated Press
Trade practices in Japan, the European Union, South Korea and China harm U.S. companies, the Clinton administration said Tuesday in its annual report on foreign trade barriers. These four led 49 countries and three trading groups put on notice that they had erected unfair trade barriers, were failing to adequately protect U.S. copyrights and patents or were otherwise engaging in trade practices that the administration considers unfair.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 1996
Tsutakiyokomatsu Asaji, 102, believed to be Japan's oldest geisha. Born Haru Kato, Asaji spent nearly 90 years as a geisha, a word literally meaning "arts person." She had continued performing the refined songs and dances of geisha tradition until April, when illness forced her to retire. Westerners usually think of a geisha as a prostitute. Although some developed intimate liaisons with patrons, the job description involves only music, dance, smiles, charming conversation and the serving of sake.
SPORTS
May 16, 1994 | SHAV GLICK
Can you imagine TV's Paul Page or Jack Arute behind the wheel of a car in next year's Indianapolis 500? Well, there is a precedent for it now. Hideshi Matsuda's only experience at Indianapolis Motor Speedway before he became this year's first qualifier was as a pit reporter for a Japanese television station. He was here in 1992 and 1993 to follow the career of countryman Hiro Matsushita. "I knew when I saw Indianapolis, it was what I wanted," Matsuda said through an interpreter.
NEWS
March 27, 1995 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Raids resumed today on facilities of the secretive religious sect Aum Supreme Truth as Japanese media reported that police now believe the deadly gas sarin was manufactured at a sect laboratory in the village of Kamikuishiki. Police are searching for evidence that could link the sect with last week's poison gas attack in Tokyo's subways that killed 10 and injured more than 5,000.
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