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Reporters Japan

SPORTS
May 16, 1994 | SHAV GLICK
Can you imagine TV's Paul Page or Jack Arute behind the wheel of a car in next year's Indianapolis 500? Well, there is a precedent for it now. Hideshi Matsuda's only experience at Indianapolis Motor Speedway before he became this year's first qualifier was as a pit reporter for a Japanese television station. He was here in 1992 and 1993 to follow the career of countryman Hiro Matsushita. "I knew when I saw Indianapolis, it was what I wanted," Matsuda said through an interpreter.
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BUSINESS
April 1, 1994 | From Reuters
The United States released its annual hit list of world trade barriers Thursday, and singled out Japan for special criticism. The trade office was quick to point out that the report had taken on "added significance" this year since President Clinton has revived a dormant sanctions tool.
BUSINESS
December 28, 1993 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Angered by a report that Japan's purchase of foreign semiconductors has continued to slide to well below its 20%-of-market target, U.S. Trade Representative Mickey Kantor called Monday for emergency talks between the two nations next month. "This latest share number raises serious concerns regarding Japan's commitment to fully implement the Semiconductor Arrangement," Kantor said in a statement issued in Washington.
NEWS
April 27, 1993 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the jet takes off and heads across the Pacific Ocean for America, Japanese Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa leaves his spacious cabin at the front to say a few words to the reporters at the back. The 33 members of the press group await him, holding flute glasses filled with champagne. "I see there are a lot of real veteran reporters on this trip," says Miyazawa, adding that he wants to "build a relationship of trust (with President Clinton) so we can deal with most problems on the phone."
BUSINESS
April 1, 1993 | From Associated Press
The Clinton Administration on Wednesday accused 44 countries of erecting unfair trade practices that rob American companies of foreign sales. Japan was singled out as the biggest perpetrator of barriers to competition, followed by the 12-nation European Community, in a report prepared by the office of U.S. Trade Representative Mickey Kantor.
BUSINESS
January 6, 1992 | From Associated Press
Japan will relax inspection standards for imported cars to boost the sale of U.S. vehicles, reports said Sunday, two days before President Bush was to arrive with demands for more open Japanese markets. Kyodo News Service said the changes would meet about 80% of U.S. requests for easing standards for imported cars. It said they would be listed in an "action plan" to be released by Bush and Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa after talks this week. Under the plan, Japan will accept the results of U.S.
BUSINESS
October 14, 1991 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two years ago Hideji Takemasa, a 34-year-old designer at NEC Corp., was asked to design an anti-gravity personal computer for a futuristic exhibit on space travel. He came up with a totally new concept: A computer built into a soft rubber wristband with a reduced-size keyboard and a built-in laser scanner.
BUSINESS
September 25, 1991 | From Reuters
Japanese companies have repeatedly withheld or delayed selling their best technology to American companies, leaving the U.S. firms at a disadvantage in world markets, the U.S. General Accounting Office said in a report Tuesday. The watchdog agency said U.S. firms were concerned that "even a brief delay in obtaining a part or piece of equipment can cause a company to fall a generation behind in its technological capabilities, resulting in lost market share." Sen. Lloyd Bentsen (D-Tex.
BUSINESS
August 19, 1991 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Boeing Co. and Europe's Airbus Industries consider plans to develop competing super jumbo jets--Leviathans with a third more seats than existing Boeing 747s--industry observers are raising a critical question: "Who will the Japanese work with?"
BUSINESS
July 22, 1991 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At first glance, Japan doesn't look like a nation suffering from a scarcity of workers. Houses here are still custom-built in the most labor-intensive manner imaginable--using lumber from thousands of tiny, inefficient mills. Department stores station women with high-pitched voices to greet customers in elevators and in front of escalators.
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