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Reporters Persian Gulf

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February 2, 1991 | RICK DU BROW, TIMES TELEVISION WRITER
Once upon a time, they were gods. Edward R. Murrow. Eric Sevareid. Charles Collingwood. William L. Shirer. They weren't born on Olympus. It just seemed that way as their voices crackled over radio, sending back to the United States their dramatic overseas reports of World War II. In fact, though, they were just a group of talented young people grappling with the new possibilities of radio, and making their reputations as a fascinated public tuned in.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 1991 | RICK DU BROW, TIMES TELEVISION WRITER
Once upon a time, they were gods. Edward R. Murrow. Eric Sevareid. Charles Collingwood. William L. Shirer. They weren't born on Olympus. It just seemed that way as their voices crackled over radio, sending back to the United States their dramatic overseas reports of World War II. In fact, though, they were just a group of talented young people grappling with the new possibilities of radio, and making their reputations as a fascinated public tuned in.
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NEWS
January 31, 1991
'The big test for American journalists has yet to come: an allied ground offensive against the dug-in Iraqis in Kuwait. This is not Vietnam, where military security and journalistic access posed few problems. This war is a big war--with censorship and military escorts for journalists--World War II style. And most journalists are new to the military and to the realities of battle.
NEWS
January 31, 1991
'The big test for American journalists has yet to come: an allied ground offensive against the dug-in Iraqis in Kuwait. This is not Vietnam, where military security and journalistic access posed few problems. This war is a big war--with censorship and military escorts for journalists--World War II style. And most journalists are new to the military and to the realities of battle.
NEWS
January 31, 1991 | NABILA MEGALLI, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The first hint of a major Gulf War ground battle sounded like a prank. I telephoned the Khafji Beach Hotel on Wednesday to inquire about an Iraqi claim that its missiles had set fire to oil refineries in Khafji, a Saudi city near the Kuwaiti border. The man on the other end said: "We are Iraqi soldiers!" I thought he was kidding. "Fine, fine," I said, laughing, "can you just please tell me if there is a fire at the refinery." "Who are you? Who are you? Huh? Who? What, Egyptian?"
NEWS
January 31, 1991 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Most Americans believe the military should increase restrictions on news reporting of the Persian Gulf War, despite protests by journalists that censorship could distort the public's understanding of the conflict, a new survey has found. An even greater majority (78%) believes the military is not hiding anything embarrassing about its conduct of the war and is telling everything it prudently can, according to the Times Mirror News Interest Index, a monthly survey of public response to the news.
NEWS
January 31, 1991 | NABILA MEGALLI, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The first hint of a major Gulf War ground battle sounded like a prank. I telephoned the Khafji Beach Hotel on Wednesday to inquire about an Iraqi claim that its missiles had set fire to oil refineries in Khafji, a Saudi city near the Kuwaiti border. The man on the other end said: "We are Iraqi soldiers!" I thought he was kidding. "Fine, fine," I said, laughing, "can you just please tell me if there is a fire at the refinery." "Who are you? Who are you? Huh? Who? What, Egyptian?"
NEWS
January 31, 1991 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Most Americans believe the military should increase restrictions on news reporting of the Persian Gulf War, despite protests by journalists that censorship could distort the public's understanding of the conflict, a new survey has found. An even greater majority (78%) believes the military is not hiding anything embarrassing about its conduct of the war and is telling everything it prudently can, according to the Times Mirror News Interest Index, a monthly survey of public response to the news.
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