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January 10, 1991 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
While U.S. and Iraqi diplomats huddled in Geneva Wednesday discussing the prospects for peace, the major television networks continued to prepare for war. By the time the United Nations' deadline for Iraq's withdrawal from Kuwait arrives Tuesday, Cable News Network will have 150 reporters, photographers and producers in the Middle East, CBS and NBC will each have about 80 and ABC will have 30 or more.
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BUSINESS
December 24, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Israeli cybersecurity researchers claim to have found a major hole in Samsung's Knox security software that leaves Galaxy S 4 devices used for enterprise and government work vulnerable to hackers. The reported security hole makes it possible for malware to intercept secure data, such as emails, on GS4 smartphones that are supposed to be protected by the Knox software, according to the Wall Street Journal . The Knox platform is designed so that users can keep their personal data on the same device as their sensitive, work-related data, which is protected separately by the Samsung security software.
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NEWS
July 9, 1991 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A great many people had reason to silence Nesino P. Toling, chief reporter, editor and publisher of the Panguil Bay Monitor. There is the governor who Toling accused of taking kickbacks. The general he said was protecting illegal loggers. The various mayors and local officials he exposed for bribery, stealing public works equipment and using police cars to go to cockfights. Then there's the wealthy businessman Toling helped jail as a "drug lord."
WORLD
November 23, 2011 | By Alexandra Zavis, Los Angeles Times
Bahrain's king on Wednesday promised reforms after an international commission reported that security officials used excessive force and torture against mostly Shiite Muslim protesters who rose up against the Sunni monarchy. Authorities had hoped the long-awaited findings, presented at a palace event attended by King Hamed ibn Isa Khalifa, would begin to heal a nation that remains deeply divided since major protests were crushed in March, even as pro-democracy uprisings spread through the Arab world.
NEWS
December 27, 1989 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The order came as CBS correspondents and their crew headed into the television station in downtown Bucharest. "Halt!" shouted the soldiers guarding the television building that has become the headquarters of the new Romanian government. But before Martha Teichner and Bob Simon and the rest of the group could identify themselves, the soldiers opened fire. "They nearly killed us," Teichner recalled. But no one was hit, and the soldiers came forward to check passports.
BUSINESS
February 9, 1998 | From Associated Press
A design flaw in computer-controlled security systems could make at least 40 of the world's airports and scores of other sites vulnerable to intruders, the New York Times reported Sunday. The system, built by Receptors Inc. of Torrance, is used for making security badges and controlling access to sensitive areas.
BUSINESS
December 24, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Israeli cybersecurity researchers claim to have found a major hole in Samsung's Knox security software that leaves Galaxy S 4 devices used for enterprise and government work vulnerable to hackers. The reported security hole makes it possible for malware to intercept secure data, such as emails, on GS4 smartphones that are supposed to be protected by the Knox software, according to the Wall Street Journal . The Knox platform is designed so that users can keep their personal data on the same device as their sensitive, work-related data, which is protected separately by the Samsung security software.
NATIONAL
August 20, 2010 | By Ashley Powers, Los Angeles Times
Just after sunset on July 30, three inmates in a remote Arizona prison skulked out of their dormitories and commenced a brazen getaway. They scooped up wire cutters one inmate's fiancee had tossed over a barrier, snipped through a chain-link fence and fled into the desert. One prisoner and his fiancee — who authorities have said fancy themselves as a modern-day Bonnie and Clyde — remain on the lam and are suspected of killing an elderly Oklahoma couple during a multistate manhunt.
NATIONAL
June 21, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Sixteen foreign-born construction workers with phony immigration documents were able to enter a nuclear weapons plant in eastern Tennessee because of lax security controls, a federal report said. Controls at the Y-12 National Security Complex in Oak Ridge have since been tightened, and there was no evidence the workers had access to any sensitive documents, said the National Nuclear Security Administration, which oversees nuclear weapons facilities for the Department of Energy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1990
People in the Los Angeles area who received Social Security benefits in 1989 and had earnings over the annual exempt amount need to file an annual report by April 16, the Social Security Administration has announced. During 1989, the annual exempt amount for people under 65 was $6,480. The annual limit for people 65 through 69 was $8,880. Earnings over these limits are counted against the amount of Social Security benefits a person can receive.
NATIONAL
August 20, 2010 | By Ashley Powers, Los Angeles Times
Just after sunset on July 30, three inmates in a remote Arizona prison skulked out of their dormitories and commenced a brazen getaway. They scooped up wire cutters one inmate's fiancee had tossed over a barrier, snipped through a chain-link fence and fled into the desert. One prisoner and his fiancee — who authorities have said fancy themselves as a modern-day Bonnie and Clyde — remain on the lam and are suspected of killing an elderly Oklahoma couple during a multistate manhunt.
WORLD
February 11, 2010 | By Borzou Daragahi and Ramin Mostaghim
Tens of thousands of government supporters streamed into Tehran's Azadi Square on Thursday to commemorate the 31st anniversary of the Islamic Revolution, state television showed, as plainclothes and uniformed security forces faced off against anti-government protesters. The opposition news website Rahesabz.net reported that security forces opened fire on demonstrators north of the square, but there was no independent confirmation. Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad delivered a defiant keynote speech broadcast live on television, condemning the West for its interference in the Middle East, hailing his nation's efforts to uplift the poor and oppressed and promoting his country's headlong drive to master nuclear technology, which has spurred international worries that Iran is pursuing atomic weapons.
NATIONAL
March 23, 2008 | Richard Fausset, Times Staff Writer
Hollywood may have had RoboCop, but the real world now has a robot more attuned to the prosaic realities of the street. The Bum Bot. That is what Rufus Terrill calls the rolling, remote-controlled invention he uses to flush out the prostitutes and pushers who gather near his Midtown Atlanta bar, which is two blocks from the city's largest and most controversial homeless shelter. "This is actually the Bum Bot 2000," Terrill gently corrected on a recent evening as he switched on the device.
WORLD
November 29, 2007 | Paul Richter, Times Staff Writer
A day after Israeli and Palestinian leaders agreed to start peace talks, Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice on Wednesday named a high-level advisor to help guide the Bush administration through thorny security issues that could hobble the negotiations. Retired Marine Gen. James L. Jones, a former NATO commander and a 40-year military veteran, will serve as a special envoy to deal with a broad range of Palestinian and Israeli security issues.
WORLD
May 12, 2006 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
Police knew of links between suspected extremists and two of the suicide bombers who launched deadly attacks on the transit system here, but they failed to follow up on the leads, in part because they were overwhelmed by a threefold increase in the number of terrorist suspects in Britain, a parliamentary report revealed Thursday.
NATIONAL
February 24, 2006 | Walter F. Roche Jr., Times Staff Writer
Two Senate Democrats are calling on Atty. Gen. Alberto R. Gonzales to appoint a special prosecutor to investigate lobbyist Jack Abramoff's activities in two Pacific island territories. In a letter made public Thursday, Sens. Jeff Bingaman of New Mexico and Ken Salazar of Colorado also asked Gonzales to provide the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee with a secret Justice Department report on security risks in Guam and the Northern Mariana Islands.
NEWS
April 15, 1990 | VICKI TORRES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One Colorado project supporters hope that the announcement of a construction loan of more than $67 million and the entry of a Japanese financial partner reportedly willing to pay more than $13 million to join the project will finally put an end to rumors plaguing the development. For months, speculation about financial backing being withdrawn swirled around one of developer Douglas Stitzel's partners, Berisford Pasadena Ltd., a subsidiary of the giant English company, Berisford International.
BUSINESS
October 28, 1995 | From Associated Press
Influential stock market commentator Dan Dorfman took a leave of absence Friday from Money magazine after a report that federal prosecutors were looking into his relationship with a stock promoter. BusinessWeek magazine, citing anonymous sources it described as close to the inquiry, said Thursday that Dorfman and stock promoter Donald Kessler are being investigated for activities including insider trading, wire and mail fraud and other violations of securities law.
NATIONAL
June 29, 2005 | From Times Wire Services
About a third of an ounce of botulinum toxin poured into a milk truck en route from a dairy farm to a processing plant could cause hundreds of thousands of deaths and billions of dollars in economic losses, according to a scientific analysis published Tuesday despite efforts by federal officials to keep the details secret. The study by Lawrence M. Wein and Yifan Liu of Stanford University discusses such questions as how terrorists could release the toxin and what effective amounts might be.
NATIONAL
June 21, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Sixteen foreign-born construction workers with phony immigration documents were able to enter a nuclear weapons plant in eastern Tennessee because of lax security controls, a federal report said. Controls at the Y-12 National Security Complex in Oak Ridge have since been tightened, and there was no evidence the workers had access to any sensitive documents, said the National Nuclear Security Administration, which oversees nuclear weapons facilities for the Department of Energy.
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