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April 21, 1990 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His staff is working behind a big steel door on the top floor of a run-down office building, but leftist magazine editor Dogu Perincek isn't around to keep an appointment made a few days before. "I'm sorry, but the police came looking for my husband yesterday, and he's in hiding," said Sule Perincek, who was pinch-hitting for him. Dogu Perincek, the editor of the magazine 2000 e Dogru--Toward the Year 2000--is in trouble with the law because he supports greater rights for the minority Kurds.
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NEWS
March 21, 2014 | By Scott Martelle
In case there were any doubts about Turkish leader Recep Tayyip Erdogan's slide into authoritarianism, they disappeared in one fell tweet Thursday when the government blocked access to the Twitter social media site. Though in the end, the move may have backfired. The editorial page noted shortly after Erdogan's Justice and Development Party pushed through a change in Turkish law last month granting Erdogan's government the power to block Internet sites that the move threatened democratic free expression and corruption probes.
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NEWS
March 21, 2014 | By Scott Martelle
In case there were any doubts about Turkish leader Recep Tayyip Erdogan's slide into authoritarianism, they disappeared in one fell tweet Thursday when the government blocked access to the Twitter social media site. Though in the end, the move may have backfired. The editorial page noted shortly after Erdogan's Justice and Development Party pushed through a change in Turkish law last month granting Erdogan's government the power to block Internet sites that the move threatened democratic free expression and corruption probes.
NEWS
April 21, 1990 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His staff is working behind a big steel door on the top floor of a run-down office building, but leftist magazine editor Dogu Perincek isn't around to keep an appointment made a few days before. "I'm sorry, but the police came looking for my husband yesterday, and he's in hiding," said Sule Perincek, who was pinch-hitting for him. Dogu Perincek, the editor of the magazine 2000 e Dogru--Toward the Year 2000--is in trouble with the law because he supports greater rights for the minority Kurds.
WORLD
April 1, 2004 | Maggie Farley, Times Staff Writer
Secretary-General Kofi Annan on Wednesday presented his own plan to reunify Cyprus after Greek and Turkish Cypriot leaders failed to agree on how to unite the long-divided island. Cypriots on the Greek and Turkish sides will vote simultaneously but separately on the plan April 24. If both sides accept, a unified Cyprus will join the European Union on May 1. If either side rejects the plan, only the Greek Cypriot side will become part of the EU.
NEWS
April 3, 2003 | Richard Boudreaux and Amberin Zaman, Special to The Times
Turkey agreed Wednesday to open its territory to shipments of fuel, food, water and medicine for U.S. soldiers in Iraq and to flights evacuating their wounded -- but not the passage of weapons or troops. In turn, U.S. Secretary of State Colin L. Powell promised Turkey an important role in rebuilding Iraq after the war and said Turkey's new commitment to the war effort could help overcome congressional opposition to $1 billion in proposed U.S. aid.
WORLD
June 24, 2012 | By Patrick J. McDonnell, Los Angeles Times
BEIRUT - A day after Syria shot down a Turkish jet, officials from the neighboring countries moved to tamp down tensions Saturday as they mounted a joint rescue operation for two pilots still missing in the eastern Mediterranean. The incident dramatically escalated tensions between two countries whose relations were already severely strained because of Turkey'stacit support of the 16-month uprising against Syrian President Bashar Assad. But there was a notable lack of bellicose rhetoric Saturday emanating from both capitals, Ankara and Damascus, underscoring the explosive potential of the incident.
NEWS
April 12, 1994 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Negotiators here have lost hope of concluding an agreement on Palestinian self-rule before a self-imposed Wednesday target date. But they edged on Monday toward an accord on civil administration and releasing thousands of Palestinian prisoners from Israeli jails. Chief Palestinian negotiator Nabil Shaath said most of the roadblocks that emerged in last week's difficult talks have been overcome.
WORLD
July 25, 2003 | Esther Schrader, Times Staff Writer
The Pentagon's plan for defeating insurgents in Iraq relies heavily on applying "a full-court press" to persuade more countries to send troops to relieve overstretched U.S. forces, senior defense officials said Thursday. In separate appearances at the Pentagon and on Capitol Hill, Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld and Air Force Gen. Richard B.
WORLD
February 24, 2003 | John Daniszewski, Times Staff Writer
Iraq is still considering whether to obey an order from chief U.N. weapons inspector Hans Blix to begin destroying its arsenal of Al-Samoud 2 missiles in the next six days and is hoping to reopen talks to resolve the question, a key Iraqi military officer said Sunday. Gen. Hussam Mohammed Amin, Iraq's liaison with U.N. inspectors, repeated Baghdad's assertion that the missiles, when loaded down with guidance systems, are incapable of exceeding the 93-mile range mandated by the U.N.
WORLD
June 15, 2010 | By Edmund Sanders, Los Angeles Times
With a sense of relief and a touch of anxiety, Israelis braced themselves Monday for another high-profile probe of their military's conduct. Relief stemmed from the hope that an Israeli-led commission, approved by the government Monday, will head off U.N. calls for an international inquiry into Israel's May 31 raid on an aid flotilla seeking to break its blockade of the Gaza Strip. Nine Turkish activists were killed in the operation. Anxiety persists, however, because recent inquiries into the military have led to political shake-ups and painful soul-searching.
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