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Reporters Wages And Salaries

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NEWS
June 11, 1990 | United Press International
Journalists went on strike for the first time in Norway on Sunday after the Journalist Union and the Newspaper Publishers' Assn. failed to agree on a contract, Norwegian Radio reported. The union and employers had agreed on wage rates but were unable to agree on union demands for improved working conditions and the right of the union to negotiate for all of its members.
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NEWS
April 1, 2000 | DANA CALVO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Employees at Fresno's top-rated television station, who stoked months of labor negotiations with rallies and a hunger strike, approved a new contract Friday night. The new contract raises some salaries 20% to 40% for union members at Channel 21 in Fresno, where many strikers were earning a fraction of what their colleagues at other stations earn. All of the union members won back pay from Dec. 1, 1999, according to Carrie Biggs-Adams, negotiator for the National Assn.
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BUSINESS
July 14, 1988 | From Reuters
The largest union at the Washington Post filed a class-action lawsuit against the newspaper Wednesday, charging systematic discrimination against women, blacks, Hispanics and other minority groups as well as employees over age 40. The complaint was filed with the District of Columbia Office of Human Rights, an administrative agency with broad investigative and prosecutorial powers.
BUSINESS
June 27, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
New Owners Set UPI Wages: The new owners of United Press International told the wire service's employees they will continue to receive the same wages but get no more than two weeks' vacation. London-based Middle East Broadcasting Center Ltd. made a $3.95-million offer for the news agency last week and won a three-way bidding contest in U.S. Bankruptcy Court. It takes control of 85-year-old UPI at midnight tonight, becoming UPI's fifth owner in 10 years.
BUSINESS
June 27, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
New Owners Set UPI Wages: The new owners of United Press International told the wire service's employees they will continue to receive the same wages but get no more than two weeks' vacation. London-based Middle East Broadcasting Center Ltd. made a $3.95-million offer for the news agency last week and won a three-way bidding contest in U.S. Bankruptcy Court. It takes control of 85-year-old UPI at midnight tonight, becoming UPI's fifth owner in 10 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 1989
About 45 reporters and copy editors at the Los Angeles Herald Examiner left their desks late Wednesday afternoon to hold a sudden "lunch hour" discussion of their contract dispute with management, leaving most of their stories unfinished by deadline. By 6 p.m., it was learned, management of the Hearst Corp.-owned paper decided to use wire service copy to cover most local news stories, declining to pay overtime to any reporter not working on exclusive or "enterprise" stories.
NEWS
April 1, 2000 | DANA CALVO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Employees at Fresno's top-rated television station, who stoked months of labor negotiations with rallies and a hunger strike, approved a new contract Friday night. The new contract raises some salaries 20% to 40% for union members at Channel 21 in Fresno, where many strikers were earning a fraction of what their colleagues at other stations earn. All of the union members won back pay from Dec. 1, 1999, according to Carrie Biggs-Adams, negotiator for the National Assn.
NEWS
June 11, 1990 | United Press International
Journalists went on strike for the first time in Norway on Sunday after the Journalist Union and the Newspaper Publishers' Assn. failed to agree on a contract, Norwegian Radio reported. The union and employers had agreed on wage rates but were unable to agree on union demands for improved working conditions and the right of the union to negotiate for all of its members.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 1989
About 45 reporters and copy editors at the Los Angeles Herald Examiner left their desks late Wednesday afternoon to hold a sudden "lunch hour" discussion of their contract dispute with management, leaving most of their stories unfinished by deadline. By 6 p.m., it was learned, management of the Hearst Corp.-owned paper decided to use wire service copy to cover most local news stories, declining to pay overtime to any reporter not working on exclusive or "enterprise" stories.
BUSINESS
July 14, 1988 | From Reuters
The largest union at the Washington Post filed a class-action lawsuit against the newspaper Wednesday, charging systematic discrimination against women, blacks, Hispanics and other minority groups as well as employees over age 40. The complaint was filed with the District of Columbia Office of Human Rights, an administrative agency with broad investigative and prosecutorial powers.
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