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SPORTS
December 13, 1994 | JIM MURRAY
Why can't a woman be more like a man? --Prof. Henry Higgins in "My Fair Lady" * Prof. 'Enry 'Iggins should have hung around a while. Women race cars, ride thoroughbreds, make putts, serve aces, play point guard, hit home runs, go into space, direct movies, run corporations, even run countries nowadays. They not only play sports, they write them. They go into battle, sit in the Senate, make our laws, judge them and set our policy. Santa Claus might turn out to be a woman next.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SCIENCE
July 23, 2007 | Denise Gellene, Times Staff Writer
Contradicting an old belief, new research released Sunday found that group therapy didn't prolong the lives of women with advanced cases of breast cancer. The report in the journal Cancer found that support groups improved patients' quality of life and had beneficial effects on mood and pain, but it undercut what had been seen as the greatest potential benefit. In 1989, a landmark study found that group therapy doubled the survival time of women with metastatic breast cancer.
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SPORTS
November 30, 1990
Quarterback Boomer Esiason of the Cincinnati Bengals said he wonders why the NFL fined his coach, Sam Wyche, more heavily for barring a female reporter from the locker room than the New England Patriots' owner was fined for his players' harassment of a female reporter in their locker room. "It was kind of like Sam is being charged with murder when all he's committed is a misdemeanor," Esiason said. "And they're being charged with a misdemeanor when they've committed a felony."
NATIONAL
April 19, 2007 | Nicole Gaouette, Times Staff Writer
Under beleaguered President Paul D. Wolfowitz, the World Bank may be scaling back its long-standing support for family planning, which many countries consider essential to women's health and the fight against AIDS. In an internal e-mail, the bank's team leader for Madagascar indicated that one of two managing directors appointed by Wolfowitz ordered the removal of all references to family planning from a document laying out strategy for the African nation.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 1990 | RICK DU BROW, TIMES TELEVISION WRITER
In CBS' new drama series "WIOU," actress Helen Shaver plays a veteran journalist who works for a failing local TV news operation that is trying, as the network says, "to make a ratings comeback." It is ironic that the one-hour series, which debuted recently and airs tonight at 10, has arrived in time for the November ratings sweeps madness, when local newscasts are often at their most shameful in creating and exploiting sensational stories.
SPORTS
October 2, 1990 | BOB OATES
Victor Kiam, owner of the New England Patriots, wasn't violating NFL directives Sunday when he named a business associate to the club's front office, a league spokesman said Monday. NFL Vice President Joe Browne said: "(Commissioner Paul Tagliabue) told Kiam not to fire or suspend any (employees), pending the investigation of (harassment) charges by (Boston reporter Lisa Olson). "(Tagliabue) was talking about current employees. (Kiam) has always been free to add (employees)."
SPORTS
October 12, 1990 | Associated Press
Cincinnati Bengal fans are chipping in to help Coach Sam Wyche pay the estimated $27,500 fine imposed by the NFL for his refusal to let a female writer into the team's locker room after a Monday night loss in Seattle last week. It's been a lively topic on radio talk shows, and now a window replacement company that uses Wyche as a spokesman has placed an ad in Cincinnati's two daily newspapers asking the public to contribute to the "Sam Wyche Fine Fund."
SPORTS
October 9, 1990 | JIM MURRAY
I guess I have to address the Lisa Olson-locker room sexual harassment issue. Everyone else has. The party line, we journalists' stance, is: How dare these scumbag athletes harass this sportswriter in the dressing room just because she's a female? OK, I'll buy that. I'm a journalist. I'm on her side. And sexual harassment of any kind is unconscionable whether it takes place at the office water cooler or Central Park. It's ugly, dangerous. It's criminal. Do it in Central Park and you go to jail.
SPORTS
October 25, 1990 | Associated Press
Zeke Mowatt, who has spent the season on injured reserve and in hot water, was activated by the New England Patriots. His season begins Sunday against Buffalo, but it could end with a report on a locker-room incident in which Mowatt and three or four other Patriots allegedly sexually harassed a female reporter. Philip Heymann, a Harvard law professor named Oct. 1 to investigate the incident, is expected to issue his report by the end of the month.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 2003 | Steve Hymon, Cara Mia DiMassa and Mitchell Landsberg, Times Staff Writers
Kathy McIver is a Democrat from La Habra and a longtime subscriber to The Times. Today's paper, she says, will be the last that will be delivered to her door. Like many readers, McIver is angry. She is angry about The Times' coverage of the California recall campaign, and especially angry about the stories that the newspaper has run in recent days detailing allegations that Arnold Schwarzenegger touched women inappropriately.
NATIONAL
January 28, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Women who don't get enough sleep and those who sleep too much may both run a greater risk of getting heart disease than those who log eight hours a day, according to a new report. Why too much sleep would lead to coronary heart disease is unclear, the report said. In terms of sleep deprivation, previous studies have indicated high blood pressure can result.
WORLD
November 27, 2002 | Maggie Farley, Times Staff Writer
UNITED NATIONS -- As the AIDS epidemic enters its third decade, for the first time women account for about half of all infected adults, and the disease has begun to destabilize countries as it leaves large swaths of people unable to work or care for their families, a U.N. report said Tuesday. This year, 5 million more people have contracted HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, and about 3 million have died from the disease.
SPORTS
December 19, 1999 | EARL GUSTKEY
* Baylor (3-3) vs. USC (4-2) at Sports Arena, 2 p.m.--The Trojans play their final home game before a tough three-game trip that closes out the nonconference schedule. USC goes to UC Santa Barbara Tuesday, then plays at Notre Dame on Dec. 27 and Rutgers on Dec. 30. . USC's challenge today is to guard Baylor's Mandy Hayworth, who made nine three-point shots in a victory over Southwest Texas State.
NEWS
October 27, 1998 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just five months ago, Anna Zarkova was waiting for a bus in Sofia, Bulgaria, at the start of her workday as a police reporter. Suddenly, a man threw sulfuric acid in her face--burning away her left ear and virtually destroying her left eye. Zarkova had been probing the nation's criminal mafia, and she paid a terrible price. But if the thugs who attacked Zarkova thought she had been silenced, they were wrong.
BUSINESS
January 16, 1996 | From Associated Press
Women's salaries are starting to catch up and, in some fields, surpass men's. But more typically, women still earn 5 cents to 15 cents less on the dollar than do men in similar jobs, Working Woman magazine reported Monday. The magazine found the pay gap for women narrowed significantly in 1995 in some jobs, such as computer analyst, but it widened in others.
SPORTS
December 13, 1994 | JIM MURRAY
Why can't a woman be more like a man? --Prof. Henry Higgins in "My Fair Lady" * Prof. 'Enry 'Iggins should have hung around a while. Women race cars, ride thoroughbreds, make putts, serve aces, play point guard, hit home runs, go into space, direct movies, run corporations, even run countries nowadays. They not only play sports, they write them. They go into battle, sit in the Senate, make our laws, judge them and set our policy. Santa Claus might turn out to be a woman next.
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