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SPORTS
September 3, 1988
People say Bruce Kimball should not represent our country, but who could be better? Certainly our statistics suggest that he is one of our average citizens. We lose thousands of people in auto accidents annually, a substantial portion of which are drinking related. If Kimball represents the system, then we should do something about the system. The problem is with drug-alcohol abuse. And that comes from the incredible pressures to succeed rather than compete. And until we recognize that there can be success in the competing rather than the winning, we're in trouble.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
April 23, 2014 | By Mark Z. Barabak
HONOLULU - In primaries across the country - in Idaho, Kentucky, Mississippi and other states - Republicans are locked in a heart-and-soul battle between purists and pragmatists clashing over what it means to represent the party, its philosophy and core values. Here in Hawaii there's a similar fight over power and purpose, but this one is between Democrats. It's a fight for a U.S. Senate seat, a rare enough prize in a state that has elected just six people senator since statehood in 1959.
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NEWS
July 28, 2009
Breed profiling: An article in Saturday's Home section about insurance companies' dog breed profiling said Tully Lehman was spokesman for the Insurance Information Institute. Lehman represents the Insurance Information Network of California.
OPINION
April 20, 2014 | By Andrew J. Bacevich
The government of Iraq last week announced that it had padlocked the infamous prison at Abu Ghraib. The gates are closed. The inmates moved. Whether the closure is permanent or temporary -- Iraqi officials suggest the latter -- this ought to qualify as a notable milestone. What does it signify? Sometimes a prison is just a building, its closure of no more significance than the demolition of a market or the shuttering of a strip mall. Yet from time to time, the closing of a facility constructed for the purpose of confining humans invites reflection.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 1985
The letter (July 14) asking who in the Coast Community College District represents the community, the students and the non-union instructors really rattled my cage, as Dear Abby is wont to say. Obviously the Board of Trustees was elected by and represents the community, including students and teachers in the district. And obviously the local chapter of the American Federation of Teachers, the legally elected bargaining agent, represents district faculty, including those who do not pay dues.
SPORTS
November 12, 2005
As an Occidental alumnus, I enjoyed the article about the undefeated Tigers. Football at Oxy is all about honor students playing sports. Contrast Oxy with the article about criminal defense lawyer Carmen Trutanich, who represents USC's honor students: "Yes, Your Honor. No, Your Honor. I won't do that again, Your Honor." ROBERT OSTROVE Oxnard
NATIONAL
March 27, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Long-shot presidential candidate Mike Gravel, 77, told supporters that he was leaving the Democratic Party to join the Libertarian Party. Gravel, a former Democratic senator from Alaska, said in an e-mail that the Democratic Party "no longer represents my vision for our great country." "It is a party that continues to sustain war, the military-industrial complex and imperialism -- all of which I find anathema to my views," Gravel said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1989
Beilenson is correct when he states that "nobody is paying much attention." He can ignore his constituents' wishes and make a mockery out of a civilized town meeting, while boasting to The Times that he could never lose an election. Beilenson hardly represents the people in his district, but he does represent the arrogant snobbery that is at the root of the House of Representatives' ethical problems. Perhaps if more people paid attention, Beilenson and others like him would be out of a job. DONALD MICHAEL BIZUB Brentwood
OPINION
July 18, 1999
Re "Crucial Birth Control Funding," editorial, July 14: Lets's hear it for worldwide, crucial birth control funding! The House will vote on a $25 million per year (for two years) contribution to a $17-billion annual cost of the United Nations Funding Program of Action. And you think this represents the steady U.S. support that UNFPA deserves. Does this demonstrate the inability of all to place the decimal point correctly, or does this represent the new form of compassion to address family planning and education on HIV?
NEWS
March 11, 1993 | From Associated Press
Two 17-year-old girls have been sentenced for torturing and butchering an elderly woman, less than three weeks after a pair of 10-year-olds were charged with murdering a toddler. Again, a troubled nation is asking, how could this happen? Edna Phillips, 70, was throttled with her dog's leash and stabbed or slashed 86 times. The mental images of the crime have shocked the nation just as the video pictures of little James Bulger being led to his death did last month.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2014 | By Kurt Streeter
A votive in a glass holder, etched with the Star of David and the words "In memory," sits on the granite table. "We will remember the terrible tragedy," Ron Wolfson says, referring to the previous day's shootings at two Jewish facilities in Kansas. The three deaths seem particularly painful on this Monday night Seder, which marks the start of Passover, the eight-day Jewish celebration of the Israelites' flight from bondage in Egypt. Wolfson and his wife are gathered in their Encino home with four generations - 16 people in all, family and friends from as far as New York.
SPORTS
April 17, 2014 | By Ben Bolch
It's springtime in Los Angeles, otherwise known as the season when the Clippers march merrily into the playoffs and the Lakers conduct exit interviews. OK, so maybe this isn't exactly an annual occurrence. The Lakers haven't missed the playoffs during a season in which the Clippers qualified since 1975-76, when the Clippers were located in Buffalo and the Lakers somehow finished two games below .500 with a roster that included Hall of Famers Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and Gail Goodrich.
OPINION
April 16, 2014 | By Peter Gottschalk
The news that a former grand dragon of the Ku Klux Klan is suspected of shooting and killing three people near Jewish community centers in Kansas seems at first glance like a disparaged past flaring briefly into the present. Americans like to imagine that the KKK belongs to a long-gone South and anti-Semitism to a distant 20th century. Sadly, this better reflects a naive faith in the nation's history of religious tolerance than the realities experienced by many religious minorities. Although the KKK has evolved and its membership has dwindled, it remains part of an American legacy of religious intolerance.
SPORTS
April 9, 2014 | By Ben Bolch
The word on Blake Griffin has changed. All he does is debunk. Lest anyone is still clinging to the ridiculous belief that he is just a dunking marvel, the Clippers forward offered another retort Wednesday night at Staples Center. He led fastbreaks. He made midrange jumpers. He flung smart passes to open teammates. Problem was, not enough of those teammates showed up during the Clippers' too-little, too-late 107-101 loss to the Oklahoma City Thunder. Griffin and Chris Paul came to play, but they aren't going to take the Clippers anywhere playing two on five.
SPORTS
April 9, 2014 | By Eric Sondheimer
 Mira Costa and Corona del Mar are headed for Honolulu this weekend to represent Southern California in facing two of Hawaii's top volleyball programs in the Punahou Clash of the Titans tournament on Friday and Saturday. They will face Punahou, led by USC-bound Larry Tuileta and junior standout Micah Ma'a. The other team is Kamehameha-Hawaii, led by Evan Enriques, headed to Stanford. The games will be broadcast live at this link at 8 p.m. and 10 p.m (L.A. time) on Friday and the same times on Saturday.
NATIONAL
April 7, 2014 | By Richard Simon
WASHINGTON - The U.S. Capitol, home to inspiring statues of Andrew Jackson, Sam Houston, Ronald Reagan. And Lucille Ball? A group seeking to increase the number of women represented in the Capitol's collection of statues includes the red-headed comedian on a list of California women who should be considered for Washington's version of a national hall of fame. Since 1864, each state has been authorized to place statues of two of its distinguished deceased citizens in the Capitol.
SPORTS
February 24, 1995 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Greg Louganis hit his head on the diving board and spilled his blood into the pool at the 1988 Olympic Games, did he have an obligation to disclose to doctors who treated him and to other athletes using the pool that he was HIV-positive?
AUTOS
July 12, 2006 | Jeanne Wright, Special to The Times
A new bill of rights for California car buyers provides grace periods for used-car purchases, caps dealer compensation on loans and features other provisions that are some of the strongest consumer protections in the country, according to state legislators and consumer advocates. The law, which went into effect July 1, applies to motor vehicles bought in California from a dealer for personal, family or household use.
SPORTS
April 2, 2014 | By Chris Foster
A former sports agent says he provided payments to a basketball star while the player competed in high school and for UCLA. Noah Lookofsky said Tyler Honeycutt and Honeycutt's mother, Lisa Stazel, were given money to cover rent, travel and the down payment on a car as the agent tried to coax them toward a representation agreement. Lookofsky said during a phone interview Wednesday afternoon that he had documentation proving he invested more than $55,000 in Honeycutt, but that "the true number is actually north of $100,000.
WORLD
March 25, 2014 | By W.J. Hennigan, Ralph Vartabedian and Don Lee
KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia - Calm seas returned Wednesday to aid the search for the missing Flight 370, but public protests and the first legal filing on behalf of a passenger hinted at a stormy forecast for Malaysia and its state-supported airline. Executives of Malaysia Airlines said Tuesday that they would pay at least $5,000 to each of the families of the 227 passengers aboard the Boeing 777 that disappeared March 8, but the gesture appeared to provide little comfort to distraught relatives, about 100 of whom marched to the Malaysian Embassy in Beijing, where some clashed with police.
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