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SCIENCE
August 6, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
Scientists at Georgia Tech have created a Mona Lisa reproduction about 30 microns wide, or about one-third the width of a human hair. The team also created a few microscopic Ansel Adams landscape reproductions as well, but copyright issues prevented the scientists from sharing those with the rest of us. Although you can find one of them -- a reproduction of a 1932 picture of a rose with driftwood -- in a study about the process that created these...
ARTICLES BY DATE
IMAGE
March 24, 2014 | By Adam Tschorn
Today it's rare to see a piece of celebrity-worn apparel - on screen or off - that can't be identified and even purchased with a few mouse clicks. From politician Sarah Palin's eyeglass frames (Kawasaki 704s) to film protagonist Jay Gatsby's bow tie (Brooks Bros.), the power of the Internet has made the world one great, big clickable catalog. But what if the jacket you covet was the one Amelia Earhart was wearing on her 1932 solo flight across the Atlantic? Or the dress of your dreams was last seen on Josephine Baker in a 1940 wartime photograph?
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OPINION
August 12, 2013 | By Naomi Cahn and June Carbone
When does a man become a father - the legally recognized parent of a child, responsible for support and eligible for custody? Historically, parenthood has involved something more than simply a biological connection. In some eras that meant the law recognized only fathers who married the mothers. Today, recognition extends to unmarried parents who raise a child together. The new question on the table is whether it extends to a man who donates sperm to a woman and establishes a relationship with the child.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
When it comes to gift books, I find myself drawn to some unorthodox choices this year. At the head of my list is Joe Sacco's "The Great War" (W.W. Norton, boxed, $35): a single panoramic drawing - 24 feet long, and accordion-folded in a slipcase - that portrays, in graphic intensity, one of the bloodiest events of the 20th century, the first day of the Battle of the Somme. And yet, in its ingenuity, its beauty and (yes) its tactile engagement, it stirs us in a variety of dimensions: the book as objet d'art . This is the secret story of the digital era, that computer production has opened the possibilities of what books are and how we connect with them, not only on screen but also on the page.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1990 | From Times staff and wire reports
Researchers at UC San Francisco have shown that a tiny population of cells in the brain, perhaps as few as 1,500, establish the basic rhythm of the reproductive cycle in humans. Researchers seeking to improve human fertility or birth control should thus focus on these cells, physiologist Richard I. Weiner said last week at a meeting of the Society for Neuroscience in St. Louis. The cells are called GnRH-secreting neurons because they regularly produce gonadotropin-releasing hormone.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1991 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Zoos have begun administering hormones to animals to try to improve the reproductive success rate. That effort already has resulted in a successful pregnancy for a 16-year-old gorilla at the Toledo, Ohio, Zoo and has produced unsuccessful pregnancies in three other females, researchers recently told a meeting of the American Assn. for the Advancement of Science.
NEWS
September 5, 1990 | LYNN SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jeanne and Gary Neumann always included a son in their ideal family. After their marriage in 1978, the Irvine couple at first let nature decide. The result was a picture-perfect daughter, followed by another. Then they tried subverting nature with at-home sex-selection methods described in self-help books. The result: two more beautiful girls. Finally, last December, they got serious.
NEWS
September 22, 1998 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
In a surprising scientific discovery that suggests pollution is feminizing animals throughout the wild, everyday concentrations of sewage effluent in rivers appear to contain estrogen-like chemicals potent enough to cause fish to be born half-male, half-female. The finding by British scientists provides strong new evidence that hormone-altering pollution--one of the most troubling and controversial environmental issues of modern times--could be a global ecological threat.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
When it comes to gift books, I find myself drawn to some unorthodox choices this year. At the head of my list is Joe Sacco's "The Great War" (W.W. Norton, boxed, $35): a single panoramic drawing - 24 feet long, and accordion-folded in a slipcase - that portrays, in graphic intensity, one of the bloodiest events of the 20th century, the first day of the Battle of the Somme. And yet, in its ingenuity, its beauty and (yes) its tactile engagement, it stirs us in a variety of dimensions: the book as objet d'art . This is the secret story of the digital era, that computer production has opened the possibilities of what books are and how we connect with them, not only on screen but also on the page.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 1988
We, as management of St. James's Club, feel compelled to respond to the tone and manner of some of the remarks made by Jonathan Gold ("Club Fed--For Members Only," June 19). Gold made obvious attempts to ridicule the appearance and dress of some of our members and guests. Surely this type of journalism is better suited to the National Enquirer than to The Times. Our Steamed Sea Bass dish, which Gold found so offensive and which he calls an "epitome of misguided British Nouvelle cuisine," is, in fact, not British at all, but was created at the three-star restaurant Lucas Carton in Paris.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times art critic
Did you know that Michiganders, in general, and Detroiters, in particular, are idle, good-for-nothing spendthrifts? Michael Kinsley thinks so. The New Republic's editor-at-large has written a snarky new column contemplating possible masterpiece sales from the Detroit Institute of Arts in the face of civic bankruptcy. The commentator likens the Motor City to the stately homes of England, which went into a "Downton Abbey" tailspin a century ago as Britain and the East India Co. began their inevitable rot. “There is a rich tradition of wastrels squandering the family fortune, then taking a few canvases to the pawnbroker's.”  CRITICS' PICKS: What to watch, where to go, what to eat There is also a rich tradition of know-nothings writing about art and museums.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun
San Pedro's Cabrillo Marine Aquarium has discovered a way to dramatically boost reproduction of California's official state marine fish - the tangerine-colored garibaldi. The aquarium is at the center of an unprecedented captive-garibaldi population explosion: 71 newborns, no bigger than pinkie fingernails, with electric-blue spots on their backs. A year ago, most of those fish would have died in infancy. But new care and feeding techniques have dramatically improved their survival rate.
OPINION
August 12, 2013 | By Naomi Cahn and June Carbone
When does a man become a father - the legally recognized parent of a child, responsible for support and eligible for custody? Historically, parenthood has involved something more than simply a biological connection. In some eras that meant the law recognized only fathers who married the mothers. Today, recognition extends to unmarried parents who raise a child together. The new question on the table is whether it extends to a man who donates sperm to a woman and establishes a relationship with the child.
SCIENCE
August 6, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
Scientists at Georgia Tech have created a Mona Lisa reproduction about 30 microns wide, or about one-third the width of a human hair. The team also created a few microscopic Ansel Adams landscape reproductions as well, but copyright issues prevented the scientists from sharing those with the rest of us. Although you can find one of them -- a reproduction of a 1932 picture of a rose with driftwood -- in a study about the process that created these...
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2013 | By Ryan Faughnder
A filmmaker is suing to make the song "Happy Birthday to You" free for everyone to use.  The plaintiff, Good Morning to You Productions Corp., a New York-based company that is making a documentary about the song, said it belongs in the public domain.  Warner/Chappell Music Inc., the publishing arm of Warner Music Group, owns "Happy Birthday to You," meaning it has exclusive rights over the song's reproduction, distribution and public performances....
OPINION
May 15, 2013 | By Alison Block
Jennifer was one of my first patients as a new doctor, and she came to see me about an unintended pregnancy. A single mom to a rambunctious 5-year-old girl, Jennifer was struggling economically and battling depression. We talked about the options available to her: continuing the pregnancy and preparing to parent another child, offering the baby for adoption or having an abortion. She chose to continue with the pregnancy, and I worked with her over the following months as she struggled with the discomforts of pregnancy, excessive weight gain and the anxiety of having to raise two small children on her own. Seven months later, I delivered Jennifer's beautiful baby boy. Six weeks after that, I saw Jennifer, her new baby and her 5-year-old for a joint checkup.
MAGAZINE
June 4, 1989
Dr. Khalil Tabsh delivered my baby daughter in 1981. I fear "Dr. Amnio," by Joy Horowitz (April 23), may evoke criticism of the doctor's methods, so I write to say that we who deeply respect life should salute this physician. Since the beginning of human existence, our reproduction has involved tragic biological waste; in the cases Dr. Tabsh handles, he bravely tries to impose some order on the randomness of that waste. PHYLLIS GROPP Huntington Beach
OPINION
March 19, 2013
North Dakota Gov. Jack Dalrymple should not sign any of the legislature's half-dozen bills that seek to subvert a well-established constitutional right to abortion. Late last week, the North Dakota legislature passed a bill that would ban a woman from having an abortion as soon as the heartbeat of the fetus is detected, which can happen as early as six weeks into a pregnancy. If Republican Gov. Jack Dalrymple signs it into law, North Dakota will have the ignominious distinction of being the most restrictive state in the country on abortion.
OPINION
December 19, 2012
For too long in the Philippine Congress, the priorities of the Roman Catholic Church took precedence over what most Filipinos wanted - and needed. Finally, after 14 years of debate and delay, lawmakers passed a bill that will provide free or subsidized birth control to poor people as well as require sex education in schools and mandate training in family planning for community health workers. Even though 80% of the nation's population is Catholic, birth control has long been available to those who want it - as long as they could pay. Contraception has been out of reach for most of the poor, though.
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