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Reproduction

HOME & GARDEN
July 14, 1990 | KEITH TUBER, Keith Tuber is a writer based in Granada Hills
Louis Comfort Tiffany, a celebrated artist and decorator whose glassware designs helped define the art nouveau style first popularized in the 1890s, died in 1933 at the age of 85. While Tiffany himself is long gone, he'd probably take comfort in knowing that his work, characterized by the linear depiction of sinuous, floral forms, lives on. Original Tiffany vases and lamps can sell at auction in New York or Paris for as much as $500,000.
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HOME & GARDEN
February 8, 1992 | PATRICK MOTT
If you don't think you have a novel in you, you'd do well to ponder the idea that one of the primary American literary forms of the past quarter century has been the T-shirt. Think of it as the short-short-short story of the age. One person's philosophy expressed in cotton casual wear. Initially, the shirts lacked content. You had to take what you found in the stores, and true self-expression was minimal.
NEWS
May 30, 1996 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
A new technique to freeze sperm-producing tissues can provide "biological immortality" for males, a finding that researchers believe may ultimately have a major impact on conserving endangered species, protecting valuable research animals and preserving the reproductive ability of males who undergo intensive chemotherapy for cancer. The technique may even make it possible for men with abnormally low sperm production to reproduce.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 2001 | GREG KRIKORIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The state attorney general's office has moved to block a recent appeals court decision allowing male prison inmates to procreate by means of artificial insemination, arguing that the case should be resolved by the U.S. Supreme Court. In a motion filed with the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals, California Atty. Gen. Bill Lockyer seeks to keep from becoming effective the appellate court decision supporting an inmate's "fundamental right" to procreate, pending a review by the nation's high court.
NEWS
October 4, 1994 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
After waiting nearly two decades to cleanse their lake-shore harbor of a million pounds of toxic waste, the people of this working-class suburb of Chicago were ready to party. Setting sail on Lake Michigan aboard a cruise ship aptly named Celebration, local, state and federal dignitaries proclaimed the elaborate $21-million cleanup of Waukegan Harbor officially complete this summer.
NEWS
June 7, 1996 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Expanding on evidence that environmental chemicals could be altering sex hormones, scientists have discovered that some pesticides with weak potential to imitate estrogen on their own become hundreds of times more potent when two are combined.
NATIONAL
October 29, 2006 | Kevin Sack, TIMES STAFF WRITER
CHAD HODGE LIKED #694. She was a 21-year-old college student, 5-feet-5, 135 pounds, with straight brown hair, blue eyes and a narrow nose. She had won 16 awards in high school for academics and music, and scored a 1210 on the SAT. She was outgoing, intelligent, responsible and friendly, or at least she said she was. Chad wanted her to be the mother of his children. But David Craig, Chad's partner of seven years, had his heart set on #685.
NEWS
March 14, 1989 | DAVID TREADWELL, Times Staff Writer
In a case where the new world of reproductive technology comes up against the old world of law and human frailty, a Tennessee couple who are getting a divorce are at odds over who should have control of their frozen embryos. Junior Lewis Davis, who initiated the divorce action, says the embryos are potential children and that he should have the right to decide whether he wants to become a father.
NEWS
October 3, 1994 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
"Every man sitting in this room today is half the man his grandfather was. And the question is, are our children going to be half the men we are?" In all likelihood, that alarming testimony--from a reproductive biologist at a congressional hearing on the hazards of pesticides--is hyperbole. Even so, it readily dramatizes the fears of many scientists that environmental pollution could be warping human sexual development.
SCIENCE
May 26, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Female sharks can fertilize their own eggs and give birth without sperm from males, according to a study published Wednesday in the British journal Biology Letters. The joint Northern Ireland-U.S. research analyzed the DNA of a shark born in 2001 at the Henry Doorly Zoo in Omaha. Analysis of the baby shark's DNA found no trace of any chromosomal contribution from a male. Shark experts said this was the first confirmed case in a shark of parthenogenesis, or "virgin birth."
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