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Reproductive Choices

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 1991
The board of directors of the Torrance League of Women Voters and the National League of Women Voters have the following position on reproductive choice: "Public policy in a pluralistic society must affirm the constitutional right of privacy of the individual to make reproductive choices." Based on this position the Torrance League of Women Voters supports the opening of the Planned Parenthood clinic in the Torrance area. In addition to allowing individuals to make informed reproductive choices, these clinics provide a full range of necessary medical services and information to those who otherwise would not be able to afford them.
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OPINION
April 7, 2002
In "Abortion Isn't Just a Federal Issue" (Commentary, April 2), Nancy Sasaki makes several good points but leaves out a most important fact: It's not just other legislatures around the country that are introducing anti-abortion laws. Bill Simon's own party has crafted one of the more noxious anti-abortion bills, AB 2537, which would require any woman seeking an abortion to obtain (and, apparently, pay for) an ultrasound. It would then require the woman to view the ultrasound before she could have her abortion.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1992
If we must enact laws that govern reproductive choices, wouldn't it be in the better interest of our children if those laws sought "to ensure that the choice (to become a parent) is thoughtful and informed"? DIANE KEITH Menifee
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 1999 | SHEILA KUEHL, Assemblywoman Sheila James Kuehl (D-Santa Monica) represents the 41st Assembly District
If you are among the majority of Californians who believe that the ability to make choices concerning reproduction is secured in the Constitution, think again. The struggle, primarily by women, to secure reproductive health services, such as contraception, sterilization, medically necessary tubal ligation, fertility treatment and abortion has shifted from the halls of justice to the halls of medical centers and hospitals.
NEWS
April 13, 1990
Your interview with Susan Carpenter McMillan introduced to your readers a naive, privileged woman of almost terrifying self-righteousness. So she felt she murdered a baby at age 21? Fine. I hereby grant her permission never to have another abortion. That presumption on my part makes about as much sense as her presumption in trying to prevent other women from making their own reproductive choices. She says: "I am a walking example of pro-choice. This is what it does to you." No, indeed: "This" (her regret 20 years later)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 1992
In response to "High Court Affirms Right to Abortion but Allows Some Restrictions by States," June 30: The Supreme Court upheld all of the Pennsylvania anti-abortion law restrictions, except notification of the woman's husband. As a pro-choice Republican, I believe in individual freedom and responsibility. The government must cease interference with the most personal, private decision a woman can make. Instead the government should focus its efforts to prevent unwanted pregnancies.
OPINION
April 7, 2002
In "Abortion Isn't Just a Federal Issue" (Commentary, April 2), Nancy Sasaki makes several good points but leaves out a most important fact: It's not just other legislatures around the country that are introducing anti-abortion laws. Bill Simon's own party has crafted one of the more noxious anti-abortion bills, AB 2537, which would require any woman seeking an abortion to obtain (and, apparently, pay for) an ultrasound. It would then require the woman to view the ultrasound before she could have her abortion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 1986 | GAIL BINION, Gail Binion is executive director of the American Civil Liberties Union of Southern California
A bill to restrict minors' access to legal abortions has once again surfaced in the California Legislature. This rider to a child-abuse bill would prohibit minors from obtaining abortions unless they had parental consent or a court order. It is not surprising that those fundamentally opposed to abortion would welcome such a law as an important step in their long march to reverse Roe vs. Wade.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 1998 | MICHAEL A. GOLDMAN, Michael A. Goldman is a professor of biology at San Francisco State University
Ten months ago, events in Scotland sent a shock through the scientific community and the moral fiber of the world. Ian Wilmut and colleagues cloned a sheep from the cell of an adult, and the possibility of cloning a living (or dead) human suddenly became a reality. A rush of presidential commissions, ethicists and scientific societies quickly condemned human cloning. But scientists and the public are beginning to view human cloning as inevitable and not so bad after all.
NEWS
February 5, 1990 | BETTIJANE LEVINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Susan Estrich never considered abortion to be her issue. Yes, she was pro-choice. And yes, she has worked on abortion cases ever since she was a law clerk. But she was so much more, well, mainstream in her interests, which usually involved national politics. All that has changed. The U.S. Supreme Court's ruling in the Webster case last July opened the door to what Estrich, 37, believes is potential disaster.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 1998 | MICHAEL A. GOLDMAN, Michael A. Goldman is a professor of biology at San Francisco State University
Ten months ago, events in Scotland sent a shock through the scientific community and the moral fiber of the world. Ian Wilmut and colleagues cloned a sheep from the cell of an adult, and the possibility of cloning a living (or dead) human suddenly became a reality. A rush of presidential commissions, ethicists and scientific societies quickly condemned human cloning. But scientists and the public are beginning to view human cloning as inevitable and not so bad after all.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1992
If we must enact laws that govern reproductive choices, wouldn't it be in the better interest of our children if those laws sought "to ensure that the choice (to become a parent) is thoughtful and informed"? DIANE KEITH Menifee
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 1992
In response to "High Court Affirms Right to Abortion but Allows Some Restrictions by States," June 30: The Supreme Court upheld all of the Pennsylvania anti-abortion law restrictions, except notification of the woman's husband. As a pro-choice Republican, I believe in individual freedom and responsibility. The government must cease interference with the most personal, private decision a woman can make. Instead the government should focus its efforts to prevent unwanted pregnancies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 1991
The board of directors of the Torrance League of Women Voters and the National League of Women Voters have the following position on reproductive choice: "Public policy in a pluralistic society must affirm the constitutional right of privacy of the individual to make reproductive choices." Based on this position the Torrance League of Women Voters supports the opening of the Planned Parenthood clinic in the Torrance area. In addition to allowing individuals to make informed reproductive choices, these clinics provide a full range of necessary medical services and information to those who otherwise would not be able to afford them.
NEWS
April 13, 1990
Your interview with Susan Carpenter McMillan introduced to your readers a naive, privileged woman of almost terrifying self-righteousness. So she felt she murdered a baby at age 21? Fine. I hereby grant her permission never to have another abortion. That presumption on my part makes about as much sense as her presumption in trying to prevent other women from making their own reproductive choices. She says: "I am a walking example of pro-choice. This is what it does to you." No, indeed: "This" (her regret 20 years later)
NEWS
February 5, 1990 | BETTIJANE LEVINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Susan Estrich never considered abortion to be her issue. Yes, she was pro-choice. And yes, she has worked on abortion cases ever since she was a law clerk. But she was so much more, well, mainstream in her interests, which usually involved national politics. All that has changed. The U.S. Supreme Court's ruling in the Webster case last July opened the door to what Estrich, 37, believes is potential disaster.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 1999 | SHEILA KUEHL, Assemblywoman Sheila James Kuehl (D-Santa Monica) represents the 41st Assembly District
If you are among the majority of Californians who believe that the ability to make choices concerning reproduction is secured in the Constitution, think again. The struggle, primarily by women, to secure reproductive health services, such as contraception, sterilization, medically necessary tubal ligation, fertility treatment and abortion has shifted from the halls of justice to the halls of medical centers and hospitals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 1993
The Beach Cities League of Women Voters strongly supports Planned Parenthood Los Angeles' proposed plan to open a clinic in the South Bay. The league believes that the services which will be offered by Planned Parenthood's proposed clinic will provide a very wide range of reproductive choices to the local community. The most important of these services is family planning, which accounts for more than two-thirds of Planned Parenthood's proposed client contacts. Planned Parenthood's proposed clinic also will offer outreach and education programs which stress the advantages of premarital abstinence to young adults as well as gynecological services and prenatal care to pregnant women.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 1986 | GAIL BINION, Gail Binion is executive director of the American Civil Liberties Union of Southern California
A bill to restrict minors' access to legal abortions has once again surfaced in the California Legislature. This rider to a child-abuse bill would prohibit minors from obtaining abortions unless they had parental consent or a court order. It is not surprising that those fundamentally opposed to abortion would welcome such a law as an important step in their long march to reverse Roe vs. Wade.
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