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Reproductive Health

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NEWS
December 19, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / for the Booster Shots blog
Fewer U.S. women ages 15 to 24 are receiving reproductive healthcare, according to a new study. This includes services such as Pap tests, pregnancy tests, contraception prescriptions, tests for sexually transmitted disease and other gynecological and obstetric care. Researchers used data from the National Survey of Family Growth, which included 4,421 young women polled in 2002 or between 2006 and 2008. Almost 60% of young women had received reproductive healthcare within the last year, but use has fallen by 8% between the two time periods.
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NATIONAL
August 25, 2013 | By Marina Villeneuve
WASHINGTON - Sarah Tuttle led her bowling team to a fourth-place finish in a nationwide tournament this April that raised $553,133 to help low-income women seeking abortions. "Some people fundraise to fight breast cancer; I fundraise for abortion access," said Tuttle, a hot line operator and board member for the Lilith Fund, a Texas nonprofit that helps women pay for abortions. "It's about having access to abortion and that not being about economics. " Representatives from such abortion rights organizations say new restrictions are disproportionately affecting women whose income is below the poverty line, about 42% of those who have abortions.
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NEWS
March 14, 2012 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Men who want a prescription for pills to treat erectile dysfunction should have to first see a sex therapist, receive a cardiac stress test and get a notarized affidavit signed by a sexual partner affirming impotency, according to legislation submitted to Ohio legislators last week by state Rep. Nina Turner,  a Democrat from Cleveland. Turner's bill is in response to another bill, dubbed the Heartbeat bill, now before the Ohio House, that would prohibit abortion once a fetal heartbeat is detected, typically around the sixth week of gestation.
OPINION
December 19, 2012
For too long in the Philippine Congress, the priorities of the Roman Catholic Church took precedence over what most Filipinos wanted - and needed. Finally, after 14 years of debate and delay, lawmakers passed a bill that will provide free or subsidized birth control to poor people as well as require sex education in schools and mandate training in family planning for community health workers. Even though 80% of the nation's population is Catholic, birth control has long been available to those who want it - as long as they could pay. Contraception has been out of reach for most of the poor, though.
WORLD
May 9, 2002 | WILLIAM ORME, TIMES STAFF WRITER
UNITED NATIONS -- More than 60 world leaders and 6,000 other delegates gathered here Wednesday for a three-day meeting on children's issues ranging from primary education funding to infant AIDS prevention and child labor abuses.
NEWS
February 5, 1990 | BETTIJANE LEVINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Susan Estrich never considered abortion to be her issue. Yes, she was pro-choice. And yes, she has worked on abortion cases ever since she was a law clerk. But she was so much more, well, mainstream in her interests, which usually involved national politics. All that has changed. The U.S. Supreme Court's ruling in the Webster case last July opened the door to what Estrich, 37, believes is potential disaster.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1998 | SUSAN BERKE FOGEL, Susan Berke Fogel is the legal director of the California Women's Law Center, a statewide nonprofit policy and advocacy center that protects the civil rights of women and girls
Access to reproductive health care is secretly being negotiated away by hospital and HMO executives every day in California and across the country. Overnight, consumers are finding that reproductive health services have disappeared from their community hospitals and health systems.
NEWS
March 30, 1986
Police arrested 48 protesters, including two priests, who stormed an Upland, Pa., abortion clinic on a self-described "rescue mission." Two sheriff's deputies and four other persons were injured, authorities said, after some of a group of about 150 demonstrators climbed a fire escape to invade the Reproductive Health and Counseling Center. The clinic has been the target of repeated protests and in 1984 won a court injunction against further demonstrations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1989
The American Assn. of University Women supports the right of every woman to safe and comprehensive reproductive health care. AAUW believes that decisions concerning reproductive health care are personal ones and that the right to make informed decisions should be available to all women. AAUW advocates choice in determination of one's reproductive life. Among a woman's most basic civil rights is the freedom to make informed choices concerning her reproductive health within the dictates of her religious and moral beliefs.
NEWS
April 4, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Planned Parenthood begins a $10-million advertising campaign Tuesday with a clear message for Congress: Health reform must cover all women's medical needs, including contraception and abortion, or lawmakers will pay at election time. "For women, reproductive health care is basic health care," said Planned Parenthood President Pamela Maraldo. "Congress must not turn its back on the women of America."
NEWS
September 6, 2012 | By Robin Abcarian
CHARLOTTE, N.C. - It was an important moment in Barack Obama's 2008 presidential campaign, and it involved a betrayal of sorts: The Kennedys, America's most storied political dynasty, turned their backs on their longtime alliance with the America's other political dynasty, the Clintons, and endorsed the young U.S. senator from Illinois. The charge was led by Caroline Kennedy, who early on, announced her support in the pages of the New York Times, in an essay called “A President Like My Father.” On Thursday evening, Kennedy, 54, reprised that theme at the Democratic National Convention, drawing a straight line between Obama, the unfinished work of her father, John F. Kennedy, and the lifelong goals of her uncle, Sen. Edward M. Kennedy of Massachusetts.
OPINION
August 24, 2012
Re "GOP hadn't planned on this debate," Aug. 22 Is The Times kidding? The GOP and the tea party elements that have taken it over have been spoiling for this debate ever since they captured the House and numerous state legislatures in 2010. After running on the economy and jobs, the Republicans have instead introduced bills seeking to limit women's access to reproductive health services, to cut off funding for Planned Parenthood, to put women's clinics out of business and even to restrict access to contraception.
NEWS
May 31, 2012 | By Noam N. Levey
WASHINGTON - Even as political fights over abortion and contraception grab headlines, very few American women identify issues of women's health as something they want to hear about from candidates this year, according to a new survey from the nonprofit Kaiser Family Foundation. Only 2 percent of registered female voters named “women's issues” as a top priority in this year's campaign. If abortion is included, that number rises only to 5 percent. By contrast, 60% registered women identified the economy as the top issue, making it far and away the most important issue in voters' minds, the national poll found.
NEWS
March 14, 2012 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Men who want a prescription for pills to treat erectile dysfunction should have to first see a sex therapist, receive a cardiac stress test and get a notarized affidavit signed by a sexual partner affirming impotency, according to legislation submitted to Ohio legislators last week by state Rep. Nina Turner,  a Democrat from Cleveland. Turner's bill is in response to another bill, dubbed the Heartbeat bill, now before the Ohio House, that would prohibit abortion once a fetal heartbeat is detected, typically around the sixth week of gestation.
NEWS
March 2, 2012 | By Kim Geiger
The call from President Obama came on Friday morning, and he wanted to know if Sandra Fluke, a Georgetown law school student who had been called a “slut” and a “prostitute” by conservative talk show host Rush Limbaugh, was OK. As much as Fluke remembered what he said, she recalled how he sounded. “He was so kind,” she said in an interview. “I was just very impressed by that.” Fluke, 30, was raised in rural Pennslyvania but has lived part-time in West Hollywood for the past five years.
NEWS
February 9, 2012 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
The debate over insurance coverage of contraception in Washington, D.C., and on the campaign trail comes at a time when public-health officials can boast of some positive developments in reproductive healthcare over the past decade. On Wednesday, researchers announced that teen birthrates have hit the lowest mark in 40 years. Implementation of the Affordable Care Act, which includes a mandate that employers must cover contraception as free preventive care, is widely viewed among public-health experts as an action that could further decrease unintended pregnancy, teen pregnancy and abortion in the United States.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 1999 | SHEILA KUEHL, Assemblywoman Sheila James Kuehl (D-Santa Monica) represents the 41st Assembly District
If you are among the majority of Californians who believe that the ability to make choices concerning reproduction is secured in the Constitution, think again. The struggle, primarily by women, to secure reproductive health services, such as contraception, sterilization, medically necessary tubal ligation, fertility treatment and abortion has shifted from the halls of justice to the halls of medical centers and hospitals.
NEWS
May 31, 2012 | By Noam N. Levey
WASHINGTON - Even as political fights over abortion and contraception grab headlines, very few American women identify issues of women's health as something they want to hear about from candidates this year, according to a new survey from the nonprofit Kaiser Family Foundation. Only 2 percent of registered female voters named “women's issues” as a top priority in this year's campaign. If abortion is included, that number rises only to 5 percent. By contrast, 60% registered women identified the economy as the top issue, making it far and away the most important issue in voters' minds, the national poll found.
NEWS
December 19, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / for the Booster Shots blog
Fewer U.S. women ages 15 to 24 are receiving reproductive healthcare, according to a new study. This includes services such as Pap tests, pregnancy tests, contraception prescriptions, tests for sexually transmitted disease and other gynecological and obstetric care. Researchers used data from the National Survey of Family Growth, which included 4,421 young women polled in 2002 or between 2006 and 2008. Almost 60% of young women had received reproductive healthcare within the last year, but use has fallen by 8% between the two time periods.
HEALTH
November 21, 2011 | By Alice Short, Los Angeles Times
It's hard to imagine a time when "Our Bodies, Ourselves" didn't take up space in bookstores and sex education classrooms and rankings on bestseller lists. The compendium of articles and essays on women's reproductive health, sexuality and social issues has been a staple among feminists and their daughters for decades. Four decades, in fact. And the 40th anniversary of "Bodies" has prompted release of a new edition. Much about this "OBOS" (as it's known to many of the faithful) will seem familiar to longtime readers.
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