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OPINION
March 19, 2013
North Dakota Gov. Jack Dalrymple should not sign any of the legislature's half-dozen bills that seek to subvert a well-established constitutional right to abortion. Late last week, the North Dakota legislature passed a bill that would ban a woman from having an abortion as soon as the heartbeat of the fetus is detected, which can happen as early as six weeks into a pregnancy. If Republican Gov. Jack Dalrymple signs it into law, North Dakota will have the ignominious distinction of being the most restrictive state in the country on abortion.
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NEWS
November 13, 2013 | By Carla Hall
Who has had an abortion? In an intriguing cover story, New York Magazine decided to answer that question with the names, faces and accounts of 26 women from varied backgrounds who have had the procedure. As New York Magazine points out, about 1.2 million unplanned pregnancies are ended by abortion each year. According to the Guttmacher Institute - a research institute that supports reproductive rights - 3 in 10 American women will have abortions by the time they are 45. Abortion is legal and pervasive and, still, many women are reluctant to talk about their own personal experiences.
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NEWS
August 19, 1992 | KATHLEEN KELLEHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On the June day that the U.S. Supreme Court upheld a Pennsylvania law restricting abortion, a new breed of feminist descended on the Federal Building in Los Angeles. Although there were hundreds of protesters, about 50 women were there in what might be called a performance protest. Some pounded fiercely on drums while others, dressed in black judicial-like robes, marched and chanted, "No choice, no peace."
OPINION
July 3, 2013
Re "Texas again takes up abortion bill," July 2 Texas Gov. Rick Perry joins a long list of conservative Republicans who are fixated on legally curtailing women's reproductive rights. This is curious because recently, Republicans in the House tried but failed to pass $20.5 billion in cuts to food stamps that would have eliminated free school lunches for hundreds of thousands of low-income children. In their blind quest to save the fetus, Republicans have forsaken the child.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1992 | FRANCES KISSLING, Frances Kissling is the president of Catholics for a Free Choice, based in Washington
Ever since Roe vs. Wade assured women the right to a safe abortion without government intrusion, opponents have worked hard for its reversal. They sought a constitutional amendment, which Congress rejected. They wrote and secured passage of restrictive state laws, which the courts, more often than not, overturned. They tried to galvanize public opinion against legal abortion, with little success. When all else failed, they placed their bodies in front of clinic doors.
WORLD
December 12, 2010 | By Chris Kraul, Los Angeles Times
When 80 women from the poor Agua Blanca district of Cali got free contraceptive implants last week, they became the first local beneficiaries of one of Latin America's most liberal reproductive rights laws. Colombia's Congress this fall passed a law guaranteeing all citizens access to free contraceptive drugs and surgical procedures, including vasectomies and tubal ligations. The benefits are only now filtering down to shanty neighborhoods such as this one in northeast Cali, where birthrates are among the nation's highest, particularly among teenagers, health officials here said.
OPINION
April 3, 1988
We noticed your excellent editorial about the Civil Rights Restoration Act. This is a note of appreciation also for your coverage of issues which affect the health of women and children. Thank you so much. SHARON FOLLICK Reproductive Rights Task Force Chair National Organization for Women West Covina Chapter
OPINION
February 10, 2006 | Anne Lamott, ANNE LAMOTT is a novelist and essayist. Her most recent book is "Plan B: Further Thoughts on Faith" (Riverhead, 2005).
EVERYTHING WAS going swimmingly on the panel. The subject was politics and faith, and I was on stage with two clergymen with progressive spiritual leanings, and a moderator who is liberal and Catholic. We were having a discussion with the audience of 1,300 people in Washington about many of the social justice topics on which we agree -- the immorality of the federal budget, the wrongness of the president's war in Iraq.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1990
I agree with columnist Colman McCarthy's assessment of Molly Yard ("A Humorless and Arrogant Overreaction," Commentary, Sept. 28) in the context of her being humorless and sensitive toward the issue of women's reproductive rights. There's nothing laughable about a gaggle of men, from the Pope to the President, legislating control over women's reproductive systems. As for "fetal rights," whatever rights there may be are conferred by the woman carrying the fetus and not the other way around.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 1992
So Riley, a philosophy instructor at a Catholic university, believes the American public is only fueled by emotional instinct and, if subjected to "gross-me-out" photos of aborted fetuses, would immediately abandon the ridiculous notion of reproductive rights? Great idea, Mr. Riley! I have an even better one, though; why don't we instruct the media to bombard the world with images of starving, impoverished families in Third World nations who continue having children because the Catholic Church tells them birth control is sinful?
OPINION
June 29, 2013
Re "Texas abortion fight galvanizes activists," June 27 Although I support women's reproductive rights, I do not think that Democratic lawmaker Wendy Davis' filibuster of a bill that would shut down almost all abortion clinics in Texas, or the disruption caused by observers in the gallery, leaves a lot to be proud of. Any filibuster is anti-democratic. Yet both sides seem to judge its value based on the end results. Just as a 40% minority should not be able to rule the Senate, one person should not be able to hold an entire assembly hostage.
NEWS
June 11, 2013 | By Carla Hall
The White House has smartly reversed its opposition to allowing girls of all ages to buy the Plan B One-Step contraceptive pill over-the-counter. The Obama administration still resists the sale of cheaper, more generic versions of the emergency contraception drug. That's unfortunate, but at least the White House has stopped its long, drawn-out court battle over availability of a drug that scientific research and the Food and Drug Administration have found to be safe and effective for girls and women of all ages.
NEWS
April 5, 2013 | By Monte Morin
A federal court judge has ordered the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to lift controversial restrictions on the so-called morning-after pill, saying females of all ages should have unimpeded access to emergency birth control. In a ruling released Thursday, U.S. District Court Judge Edward Korman directed the FDA to make levonorgestrel-based contraceptives available over the counter, and without a prescription. The ruling overturns a 2011 decision by Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius requiring that girls under age 17 obtain a prescription for the Plan B One-Step contraceptive or its equivalents In his strongly worded ruling, Korman called Sebelius' decision “politically motivated, scientifically unjustified and contrary to agency precedent.” No serious health risks have been associated with the drug's use among adults and children, Korman wrote, and even the FDA acknowledged that the drug's “safety and efficacy in the pediatric population have been established.” The ruling comes in response to a lawsuit filed by the Center for Reproductive Rights, which argued that restrictions placed on the drug imposed unreasonable delays for women of all ages.
OPINION
March 19, 2013
North Dakota Gov. Jack Dalrymple should not sign any of the legislature's half-dozen bills that seek to subvert a well-established constitutional right to abortion. Late last week, the North Dakota legislature passed a bill that would ban a woman from having an abortion as soon as the heartbeat of the fetus is detected, which can happen as early as six weeks into a pregnancy. If Republican Gov. Jack Dalrymple signs it into law, North Dakota will have the ignominious distinction of being the most restrictive state in the country on abortion.
OPINION
December 2, 2012 | Malcolm Potts; Gopi Gopalakrishnan; J. Joseph Speidel; Kirsten Thompson; Leona D'Agnes; and Joan Castro; Martha Campbell; Djavad Salehi-Isfahani; William N. Ryerson; Carl Pope; John F. May; and Rajiv Shah
Hunger. Environmental degradation. Political instability. These were among the consequences of rapid global population growth documented in a five-part series in The Times in July. Now, Opinion has invited leading scholars to consider what, if anything, people and governments can do to address the issue. In the brief essays that follow, Malcolm Potts from UC Berkeley sets up the situation we are facing, and population experts from around the globe explain some of the approaches they've seen work -- and the reasons others have not. The series, by Times staff writer Kenneth R. Weiss and staff photographer Rick Loomis, can be found at latimes.com/populationrising.
OPINION
September 13, 2012 | Meghan Daum
It's a strange time to be a woman. I say this not because state legislatures enacted no less than 95 restrictions on reproductive rights this year. I say it not because at the same time, Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker repealed his state's equal pay law and Wisconsin state Sen. Glenn Grothman conjectured that "money is more important for men. " Or because, just last month, an alarming number of male legislators demonstrated serious confusion about the birds and the bees. I'm saying it because Naomi Wolf has written a book about her vagina.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 1989
They're ba-ack! Every time we as women stand up for ourselves and our own rights, some petulant man stamps his foot and calls us selfish. Cal Thomas (Op-Ed Page, April 13) simplistically reduces the abortion argument to one of right and wrong. Such clear vision apparently requires no proof; instead, he offers us his general displeasure expressed in the by now standard refrain of oooh, oooh, the country is going to hell. If we wonder where in his either-or philosophy he places reproductive rights, we see them glowing through the fog under either men control them or they don't exist at all. Men of Thomas' ilk, while bemoaning the "repeal of a moral code" (which they often devised for their own convenience)
OPINION
October 27, 2008
Re "Not about notification," editorial, Oct. 23 The Times claims that Proposition 4 is really about turning "back the clock on abortion rights." What the proposition really does is restore parental rights. While The Times insinuates that supporters of Proposition 4 are attempting to mislead voters, what is clear is that the same social engineers who fought to make it legal for campus officials to excuse minors from school property to facilitate an abortion without so much as notifying parents (which present California law allows)
NEWS
September 6, 2012 | By Robin Abcarian
CHARLOTTE, N.C. - It was an important moment in Barack Obama's 2008 presidential campaign, and it involved a betrayal of sorts: The Kennedys, America's most storied political dynasty, turned their backs on their longtime alliance with the America's other political dynasty, the Clintons, and endorsed the young U.S. senator from Illinois. The charge was led by Caroline Kennedy, who early on, announced her support in the pages of the New York Times, in an essay called “A President Like My Father.” On Thursday evening, Kennedy, 54, reprised that theme at the Democratic National Convention, drawing a straight line between Obama, the unfinished work of her father, John F. Kennedy, and the lifelong goals of her uncle, Sen. Edward M. Kennedy of Massachusetts.
NEWS
August 20, 2012 | By Christi Parsons
President Obama today condemned the statements of Rep. Todd Akin on the subject of rape, tying the conservative lawmaker's remarks to Mitt Romney and other Republicans who oppose reproductive rights. “Rape is rape,” Obama told reporters this afternoon, referring to the Missouri Republican's statement that victims of “legitimate rape” don't usually get pregnant. “The idea that we should be parsing, qualifying, slicing what types of rape we're talking about doesn't make sense to the American people,” Obama said during a surprise visit to the White House briefing room.
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