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NEWS
March 7, 1985 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN, Times Staff Writer
Aircraft noise over the San Fernando Valley will drop significantly in a few weeks, partly because Republic Airlines plans to quit flying into Burbank Airport, officials said Monday. Republic operates the largest number of noisy flights at Burbank. It will quit using the airport March 31 as part of what its officials called a reorganization of its routes.
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BUSINESS
December 30, 1987 | From Reuters
United Airlines has begun frequent flights from here to Chicago, the first step in what analysts say is a growing turf battle in Northwest's own home base. Under deregulation, carriers have largely carved up the nation, with one or two airlines dominant in most major cities. Other carriers have found it difficult to compete with an airline that offers a wide range of flights and times for travelers from a given city.
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BUSINESS
January 25, 1987 | ROBERT E. DALLOS, Times Staff Writer
It had some of the ingredients of a spy thriller: clandestine rendezvous at secluded restaurants, meetings in hotel rooms under fictitious names. And there were some casualties. It all began in June, 1985, at the Cherokee Sirloin Room, a family restaurant in a suburb of St. Paul, Minn. "The steaks were great," recalls Steven G. Rothmeier, chairman of Northwest Airlines, of his first secret meeting with Stephen M. Wolf, head of Republic Airlines.
BUSINESS
August 12, 1986 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN
Flying Tiger Line, the troubled Los Angeles-based air cargo carrier, Monday named Stephen M. Wolf president and chief executive. Under Wolf's leadership, Republic Airlines managed to turn around from sustained losses over the last three years and was recently acquired by Northwest Orient Airlines. "Flying Tiger has lost a herculean amount of money over the last several years, and clearly something needs to be done to restore its health," Wolf said in an interview.
BUSINESS
January 24, 1986 | Associated Press
The parent company of Northwest Airlines has agreed to buy Republic Airlines for $884 million, officials of the two Minneapolis-based companies said Thursday. The deal, if approved by shareholders and the federal government, will make Northwest the nation's third-largest carrier behind United Airlines and American Airlines, said Steven G. Rothmeier, Northwest's president and chief executive. The agreement calls for Republic's shareholders to be paid $17 per share by NWA Inc.
BUSINESS
March 5, 1985 | ROBERT E. DALLOS, Times Staff Writer
Republic Airlines, which has served Burbank and Ontario airports for more than a quarter of a century, said Monday that it will end its service to those cities April 1. Republic operates nine flights into and out of Burbank daily, four of them to and from Phoenix and the other five to and from Las Vegas. It has eight flights into and out of Ontario and four each to and from Las Vegas and Phoenix.
BUSINESS
February 19, 1986 | ROBERT E. DALLOS, Times Staff Writer
The Justice Department said Tuesday that the planned merger of Northwest Airlines and Republic Airlines, which would create the nation's third-largest airline, "raises competitive concerns" that must be addressed before the Transportation Department grants final approval. The Justice Department, in a filing with the Transportation Department, said it is taking no position on the merits of Northwest's proposed acquisition of Republic. NWA Inc., Northwest's parent holding company, announced Jan.
BUSINESS
January 25, 1987 | ROBERT E. DALLOS, Times Staff Writer
It had some of the ingredients of a spy thriller: clandestine rendezvous at secluded restaurants, meetings in hotel rooms under fictitious names. And there were some casualties. It all began in June, 1985, at the Cherokee Sirloin Room, a family restaurant in a suburb of St. Paul, Minn. "The steaks were great," recalls Steven G. Rothmeier, chairman of Northwest Airlines, of his first secret meeting with Stephen M. Wolf, head of Republic Airlines.
BUSINESS
December 30, 1987 | From Reuters
United Airlines has begun frequent flights from here to Chicago, the first step in what analysts say is a growing turf battle in Northwest's own home base. Under deregulation, carriers have largely carved up the nation, with one or two airlines dominant in most major cities. Other carriers have found it difficult to compete with an airline that offers a wide range of flights and times for travelers from a given city.
BUSINESS
August 12, 1986 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN
Flying Tiger Line, the troubled Los Angeles-based air cargo carrier, Monday named Stephen M. Wolf president and chief executive. Under Wolf's leadership, Republic Airlines managed to turn around from sustained losses over the last three years and was recently acquired by Northwest Orient Airlines. "Flying Tiger has lost a herculean amount of money over the last several years, and clearly something needs to be done to restore its health," Wolf said in an interview.
TRAVEL
August 3, 1986 | PETER S. GREENBERG, Greenberg is a Los Angeles free-lance writer.
Did the airline lose your bags? Did the in-flight meal make you sick? Did the tour brochure make promises it didn't deliver? Worse yet, were you hijacked? If the answer to any of these questions is yes, then chances are you have considered a lawsuit. Business is brisk in at least one travel area--claims and lawsuits filed by angry, abused or downright greedy travelers. Many of the cases are, at the least, entertaining.
BUSINESS
April 1, 1986 | ROBERT E. DALLOS, Times Staff Writer
The Justice Department voiced its total opposition Monday to the proposed merger of Northwest and Republic airlines on the grounds that it would suppress competition. If approved by the government and shareholders, the merger would create the nation's third-largest carrier behind United and American airlines. Under terms of the agreement, NWA Inc., the parent of Northwest, would pay $884 million for Republic.
BUSINESS
February 19, 1986 | ROBERT E. DALLOS, Times Staff Writer
The Justice Department said Tuesday that the planned merger of Northwest Airlines and Republic Airlines, which would create the nation's third-largest airline, "raises competitive concerns" that must be addressed before the Transportation Department grants final approval. The Justice Department, in a filing with the Transportation Department, said it is taking no position on the merits of Northwest's proposed acquisition of Republic. NWA Inc., Northwest's parent holding company, announced Jan.
BUSINESS
January 24, 1986 | Associated Press
The parent company of Northwest Airlines has agreed to buy Republic Airlines for $884 million, officials of the two Minneapolis-based companies said Thursday. The deal, if approved by shareholders and the federal government, will make Northwest the nation's third-largest carrier behind United Airlines and American Airlines, said Steven G. Rothmeier, Northwest's president and chief executive. The agreement calls for Republic's shareholders to be paid $17 per share by NWA Inc.
TRAVEL
August 3, 1986 | PETER S. GREENBERG, Greenberg is a Los Angeles free-lance writer.
Did the airline lose your bags? Did the in-flight meal make you sick? Did the tour brochure make promises it didn't deliver? Worse yet, were you hijacked? If the answer to any of these questions is yes, then chances are you have considered a lawsuit. Business is brisk in at least one travel area--claims and lawsuits filed by angry, abused or downright greedy travelers. Many of the cases are, at the least, entertaining.
BUSINESS
April 1, 1986 | ROBERT E. DALLOS, Times Staff Writer
The Justice Department voiced its total opposition Monday to the proposed merger of Northwest and Republic airlines on the grounds that it would suppress competition. If approved by the government and shareholders, the merger would create the nation's third-largest carrier behind United and American airlines. Under terms of the agreement, NWA Inc., the parent of Northwest, would pay $884 million for Republic.
NEWS
March 7, 1985 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN, Times Staff Writer
Aircraft noise over the San Fernando Valley will drop significantly in a few weeks, partly because Republic Airlines plans to quit flying into Burbank Airport, officials said Monday. Republic operates the largest number of noisy flights at Burbank. It will quit using the airport March 31 as part of what its officials called a reorganization of its routes.
BUSINESS
March 5, 1985 | ROBERT E. DALLOS, Times Staff Writer
Republic Airlines, which has served Burbank and Ontario airports for more than a quarter of a century, said Monday that it will end its service to those cities April 1. Republic operates nine flights into and out of Burbank daily, four of them to and from Phoenix and the other five to and from Las Vegas. It has eight flights into and out of Ontario and four each to and from Las Vegas and Phoenix.
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