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Republic Of Congo Revolts

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NEWS
August 26, 1998 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Angolan jets streaked deep into this huge Central African country and bombed its third-largest city Tuesday, apparently targeting Ugandan troops sent to bolster Congolese rebels in a growing regional war. The battle at Kisangani, the rebel-held river port about 770 miles northeast of this capital, opened a new front in the 3-week-old conflict.
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NEWS
April 28, 2001 | From Associated Press
Attackers with guns and machetes shot and slashed to death six Red Cross workers on a remote road in eastern Congo, leaving their bodies to be discovered in their burned vehicles, aid workers said Friday. The ambush Thursday marked the deadliest single attack on the International Committee of the Red Cross in five years. The victims were a Swiss nurse, a Colombian relief worker and four Congolese. Some were shot, others were both shot and cut with machetes, said Boni Mbaka, a U.N.
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NEWS
August 10, 2000 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
War turned former taxi driver Justin Didier Kimbala into a gun-toting militiaman. Peace is making him an advocate of forgiveness and reconciliation. When fighting based on region and ethnicity erupted in June 1997 between Congolese militias, Kimbala, a southerner, found himself trapped among northerners. He was subsequently arrested, thrown in jail for a month and tortured. When he was released, his body was riddled with burns. He could hardly walk.
NEWS
February 2, 2001 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Colin L. Powell, who has pledged to make Africa a higher U.S. priority, met Thursday with Congo's new president to explore the prospect of ending that country's complex, many-sided war. Powell discussed the deteriorating situation in Congo with President Joseph Kabila, who last month succeeded his assassinated father, onetime guerrilla chieftain Laurent Kabila. The session followed a similar discussion Wednesday between Powell and Rwandan President Paul Kagame.
NEWS
January 15, 1999 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ending a two-week trek from terror, refugees from neighboring Congo on Thursday told of seeing civilians being burned alive and shot as they tried to escape a New Year's massacre by rebel soldiers in a remote eastern village. The reports of the refugees, newly arrived at a U.N.
NEWS
January 30, 2000 |
An international aid agency warned Saturday that another Rwanda-style crisis is looming in northeastern Congo, where about 5,000 people have been killed in months of tribal fighting. Christian Blind Mission, or CBM, which has released a grisly video of victims, said international intervention is needed to end the conflict. "We estimate around 5,000 people have died since June, and many thousands more have been displaced," said David McAllister, a CBM regional representative.
NEWS
August 2, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Congolese rebel leader Jean-Pierre Bemba signed a cease-fire in Lusaka, Zambia, but said he would go back to war if a rival rebel group, the Rwandan-backed Congolese Rally for Democracy, or RCD, did not sign the truce within a week. The RCD has refused to agree to the cease-fire because of internal divisions. Approval of the truce by the RCD is important because it controls nearly 50% of Congo, and analysts say a cease-fire is impossible without its support.
NEWS
June 27, 1999 | From Associated Press
A peace summit to end Congo's civil war was postponed Saturday as negotiators wrangled over conditions for a cease-fire. Outside mediators still hoped to salvage a deal "within days." Congolese rebel leaders met face to face with government officials for the first time in weeks, fueling hopes that a full-scale summit was still in the offing, said Salim Ahmed Salim, secretary general of the Organization of African Unity. Salim added that all the warring parties were at the meeting Saturday.
NEWS
March 15, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
President Laurent Kabila named a new government for Congo, appointing a former ally of late dictator Mobutu Sese Seko to a key Cabinet post. In the Cabinet announced on state television, former Mobutu associate and business tycoon Bemba Saolona, whose son heads a guerrilla movement fighting to topple Kabila, was named Minister for Economy and Industry. Meanwhile, rebels killed more than 100 villagers in southeastern Congo, the Italian Missionary Service News Agency reported.
NEWS
January 17, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Talks aimed at ending Congo's civil war broke up with sniping and acrimony among officials from 15 African nations. The discussions ended after dawn in Lusaka, the Zambian capital, after Congo accused its foes Rwanda and Uganda of refusing to observe a minute's silence for Congolese war victims.
NEWS
January 18, 2001 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The apparent assassination of Congolese President Laurent Kabila has created a dangerous power vacuum that could lead to an escalation of the troubled country's civil conflict as the warring sides jostle for control, analysts and diplomats said Wednesday. Any intensification of the fighting would plunge the vast Central African nation into another chaotic phase in its tumultuous history, they warned.
NEWS
January 18, 2001 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Day or night, sober or drunk, Laurent Desire Kabila wasn't shy about calling his chief U.S. contact at the height of his war against Zairian dictator Mobutu Sese Seko. "He frequently called me at my house, sometimes in the middle of the night," recalled Peter Whaley, a now-retired diplomat who served as political officer at the U.S. Embassy in the Rwandan capital, Kigali, at the time of the 1996-97 conflict. "Once he called me, drunk as a skunk, and he said: 'Mr.
NEWS
January 17, 2001 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Laurent Kabila of the Democratic Republic of Congo was shot in a 30-minute gun battle Tuesday at his residence, and some diplomats and sources in neighboring countries said he had been killed. Airports and borders were closed, and a curfew was imposed, but Congolese government officials in Kinshasa, the capital, did not confirm that the president was dead.
NEWS
September 16, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Congolese rebels said they had discovered the bodies of 51 civilians who appeared to have been shot at close range by government troops retreating from Dongo, a town on the Ubangui River near Congo's border with the Central African Republic. Jean-Pierre Bemba, leader of the Ugandan-backed Congolese Liberation Movement, which is fighting to oust President Laurent Kabila, said the 47 men and four women were killed Sept. 8 in Dongo, about 435 miles northeast of the capital, Kinshasa.
NEWS
August 10, 2000 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
War turned former taxi driver Justin Didier Kimbala into a gun-toting militiaman. Peace is making him an advocate of forgiveness and reconciliation. When fighting based on region and ethnicity erupted in June 1997 between Congolese militias, Kimbala, a southerner, found himself trapped among northerners. He was subsequently arrested, thrown in jail for a month and tortured. When he was released, his body was riddled with burns. He could hardly walk.
NEWS
June 20, 2000 | Associated Press
At least 518 people, including 319 Congolese civilians, died during the week that Rwandan and Ugandan troops battled over the Congolese city of Kisangani, the International Committee of the Red Cross said Monday. The agency said the toll could rise as aid workers clear the rubble of bombed-out houses and apartments. It said 120 soldiers also died in the June 5-10 fighting. Three rebel factions are battling to oust Congolese President Laurent Kabila, and five foreign armies are also involved.
NEWS
September 1, 1999 | From Times Wire Services
Rival rebel leaders agreed Tuesday to put aside internal squabbles and sign a cease-fire to end Congo's yearlong civil war, a morass that has spilled over into neighboring countries and raged on despite months of negotiations. "The signing of the cease-fire agreement on the Congo is a demonstration that Africa is beginning to assume responsibility for solving its own problems," said Zambian President Frederick Chiluba, a key mediator in the peace process.
NEWS
August 24, 1998 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Angolan troops intervening to help stop an armed revolt in Congo dealt the rebels a severe setback Sunday by recapturing a key military airport for President Laurent Kabila. The airport at Kitona, near Congo's Atlantic coast, had been the rebels' main base for a lightning advance toward this tense capital, about 200 miles inland. Their loss of the base, after a cross-border tank assault from Angola, dimmed their chances of reaching Kinshasa and ousting Kabila's government.
NEWS
June 9, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
An estimated 1.7 million people have died as a direct or indirect result of fighting in eastern Congo over the past 22 months, a U.S.-based refugee organization reported. Calculations based on mortality surveys showed that more than 2.3 million people died in five eastern provinces between August 1998 and May of this year, the International Rescue Committee said. According to U.S.
NEWS
May 5, 2000 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As U.N. Security Council envoys arrived in Africa on Thursday to assess prospects for deploying peacekeepers in the Democratic Republic of Congo, analysts expressed doubt about the success of such a force in the wake of an attack this week against U.N. troops elsewhere on the continent.
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