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Republic Ship

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NEWS
June 15, 1987 | United Press International
A team of treasure hunters embarked Sunday on "the chance of a lifetime" to salvage what they believe are gold coins worth as much as $1.6 billion from the wreckage of a luxury liner that sank in 1909. "This is the one I've been after for years," said William Flower, leading a team of divers who will search the remains of the Republic on the floor of the Atlantic about 55 miles south of Nantucket, Mass. The Republic, a 585-foot luxury liner owned by banker J. P. Morgan's White Star Shipping Co.
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NEWS
June 15, 1987 | United Press International
A team of treasure hunters embarked Sunday on "the chance of a lifetime" to salvage what they believe are gold coins worth as much as $1.6 billion from the wreckage of a luxury liner that sank in 1909. "This is the one I've been after for years," said William Flower, leading a team of divers who will search the remains of the Republic on the floor of the Atlantic about 55 miles south of Nantucket, Mass. The Republic, a 585-foot luxury liner owned by banker J. P. Morgan's White Star Shipping Co.
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TRAVEL
August 28, 2005 | Jane Engle
GOLD coins, bottles and other artifacts recovered from the Republic, a ship that sank off Georgia during an 1865 storm, comprise the heart of the collection at a new museum in New Orleans. Odyssey's Shipwreck & Treasure Adventure, which was to have opened Saturday, presents about 200 items from the vessel. Odyssey Marine Exploration Inc. of Tampa, Fla.
NEWS
May 23, 1994 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Meet Bobouson Myrtil. He's 18 months old, about two feet tall, weighs perhaps 25 pounds, has enormous, entrancing dark eyes and, his mother says, "is going to die." Bobouson doesn't know why he chokes on mucus and goes to sleep each night crying from hunger or that his life is likely to get worse, and neither does his mother, Emilia Myrtil, a 35-year-old with three other children so malnourished and ill that, she says in a flat voice, "they will all die."
BUSINESS
January 21, 2009 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
For years, retailers could afford to be sloppy about running their businesses because customers kept buying. No more. Stung by the worry that shoppers -- who cut spending by the most dramatic amount in at least 39 years this holiday season -- may not start spending again for a long time, stores are making drastic changes.
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