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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 2007 | Duke Helfand and Steve Hymon, Times Staff Writers
Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa spoke publicly for the first time Monday about the breakup of his 20-year marriage, saying he was responsible for the split even as he refused to talk about what caused it. In a somber meeting with reporters at City Hall, Villaraigosa declined to answer questions about whether the break with his wife, Corina, was triggered by another romantic relationship.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2014 | By Seema Mehta
As Republicans seek to improve their standing among Latinos and women, fresh controversies in California could further damage the party with both groups. On Monday, a GOP gubernatorial candidate's inflammatory rhetoric likening illegal immigration to war came to light. The previous day, a conservative website on California politics was launched, featuring a raunchy photo-shopped image of House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi - a depiction that prompted the most powerful Republican congressman from California to remove his column from the site.
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NATIONAL
April 5, 2014 | By Lisa Mascaro
PEARL, Miss. - Sen. Thad Cochran is a portrait of the genteel Southern politician, known for three-piece suits, a shock of white hair and shoveling billions of government dollars back to his impoverished home state to repair levees, construct research facilities at Ole Miss and bolster catfish farms. That spending prowess once reaped rewards for the Mississippi senator, with buildings bearing his name, easy reelection campaigns and so much public affection that he's known here simply as "Thad.
OPINION
April 7, 2014 | Jonah Goldberg
For years, Republicans benefited from economic growth. So did pretty much everyone else, of course. But I have something specific in mind. Politically, when the economy is booming - or merely improving at a satisfactory clip - the distinction between being pro-business and pro-market is blurry. The distinction is also fuzzy when the economy is shrinking or imploding. But when the economy is simply limping along - not good, not disastrous - like it is now, the line is easier to see. And GOP politicians typically don't want to admit they see it. Just to clarify, the difference between being pro-business and pro-market is categorical.
NEWS
November 7, 2012 | By Lisa Mascaro
WASHINGTON - With the concession of the Republican in the North Dakota Senate race, Democrat Heidi Heitkamp becomes the uncontested winner,  and the 20 th woman to join the upper chamber in the new Congress, setting a  record. Republican Rep. Rick Berg conceded the race Wednesday in Fargo during a luncheon meeting of party members, declining to seek a recount for the race that was decided by fewer than 3,000 votes. “We see no reason to believe that the result of this election will change over the course of the official certification process,” Berg said in a statement.
NEWS
February 2, 2012 | By Michael A. Memoli
The number of states with a clear Republican advantage doubled in 2011, part of a larger trend of states shifting into the GOP column, according to new Gallup data. Since 2008, the number of states classified as "solid Democratic" dropped from 30 to 12; 10 states are now "solid Republican," up from four. The designations are based on interviews with more than 350,000 adults in all 50 states over the course of the year. Respondents are asked whether they identify with or lean toward one party or another; states called "solidly" Democratic or Republican are those in which one party has an advantage of 10 percentage points or greater.
NEWS
September 19, 2012 | By Danielle Ryan
WASHINGTON -- The House on Wednesday afternoon passed by voice vote the Republican version of the Buffett Rule. The bill, which probably won't be picked up by the Senate until after the November elections, would allow Americans to check a box on their tax forms and voluntarily donate money, in addition to their normal tax liabilities, to pay down the national debt. The original Buffett Rule, supported by President Obama, failed in the Senate in April. That bill would have required those making $1 million or more annually to pay at least 30% in taxes.
NEWS
February 13, 2012 | By David Lauter
President Obama for the first time has opened a sizable lead over his most likely Republican opponents, thanks to growing support among independent voters, according to a new Pew Research Center poll . The poll, released Monday, showed Rick Santorum in a virtual tie with Mitt Romney in the Republican presidential race. Santorum, the former Pennsylvania senator, has moved up as a result of his backing from tea party Republicans and white evangelicals. He led Romney, the former Massachusetts governor, 30% to 28% among Republican and Republican-leaning registered voters in the survey, which was conducted Feb. 8-12 and had a margin of error of 5 percentage points.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2014 | By Tony Perry
SAN DIEGO -- With more than half the votes counted Tuesday night, Councilman Kevin Faulconer had a sizable lead over Councilman David Alvarez in the special election to replace former Mayor Bob Filner. Faulconer, 47, a Republican, was leading Alvarez, 33, a Democrat, by 57% to 43% among the 166,599 ballots that were mailed in or brought to the elections' department before Tuesday's balloting. Assuming that the overall turnout is in the range of 40%, as many political pros expect, those 166,599 ballots would account for about 60% of the overall vote.
NATIONAL
February 8, 2012 | Mark Z. Barabak
The road to the Republican presidential nomination just got longer, steeper and less predictable. Mitt Romney is still the prohibitive front-runner as the race heads now to Arizona and Michigan. He alone has the financial and organizational wherewithal to stay in the race and fight in every contest through the last big day of balloting, on June 5. But by losing three out of three Tuesday contests to Rick Santorum - two of them in blowouts - Romney underlined several of the weaknesses of his candidacy, starting with his failure to connect with the GOP's most conservative voters.
NATIONAL
April 5, 2014 | By Lisa Mascaro
PEARL, Miss. - Sen. Thad Cochran is a portrait of the genteel Southern politician, known for three-piece suits, a shock of white hair and shoveling billions of government dollars back to his impoverished home state to repair levees, construct research facilities at Ole Miss and bolster catfish farms. That spending prowess once reaped rewards for the Mississippi senator, with buildings bearing his name, easy reelection campaigns and so much public affection that he's known here simply as "Thad.
NATIONAL
April 3, 2014 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON - Democrats struggling to combat a flood of outside money pouring in to defeat their candidates have found at least a temporary solution: If you can't beat them, brand them. The latest strategy of Democratic messaging is tying Republican candidates and policies to the party's most prominent - and at times vilified - financial patrons, billionaire industrialists Charles and David Koch. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) initiated the strategy last month when he decried the brothers - whose last name is pronounced "coke" - from the Senate floor as "shadowy billionaires" and "un-American.
NATIONAL
April 2, 2014 | By Christi Parsons and Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON - President Obama said Wednesday that Republicans were "not necessarily coldhearted" in their policies but then devoted much of his speech at the University of Michigan to lampooning GOP opposition to his views on economic issues, including his proposal to raise the federal minimum wage. As Congress gears up for a debate on his proposal to raise the minimum wage to $10.10 an hour, Obama said lawmakers would have to decide between sticking with him or sticking it to working Americans.
NATIONAL
March 29, 2014 | By Maeve Reston
LAS VEGAS - Long before voters begin paying attention to the 2016 presidential contest, the quiet race for the Republican Party's most elite donors was well under way in recent days as potential candidates made a pilgrimage west to court prolific spender Sheldon Adelson and other members of the Republican Jewish Coalition. During speeches Saturday, Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker, Ohio Gov. John Kasich and New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie all addressed the key concerns of Adelson and many group members - the threat of a nuclear Iran, their desire to strengthen U.S. ties with Israel, and what they view as the waning prestige of the U.S. abroad.
OPINION
March 27, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Maybe it was too good to be true. A rare bipartisan healthcare reform proposal backed by leaders of three major House and Senate committees is foundering because Republicans and Democrats can't agree on how to pay for it. The irony is that the measure, which would change the way Medicare reimburses doctors, would slow the growth of healthcare spending and taxpayers' costs. Lawmakers should stop the partisan bickering and start working in good faith to find a way to enact the long-overdue and much-needed reform.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 2014 | By Patrick McGreevy and Seema Mehta
SACRAMENTO - Gov. Jerry Brown has built a war chest of $19.7 million to fund his bid for an unprecedented fourth term, easily eclipsing the money raised by his challengers, according to new campaign reports filed with the state. Brown has raised nearly $3 million this year and spent nearly $95,000, his report shows. Top contributors include several labor unions, Netflix Inc. co-founder Reed Hastings, Napster co-founder Sean Parker and several descendants of the founders of the Gap Inc., the clothing company where Brown's wife, Anne Gust Brown, was once an executive.
OPINION
April 28, 2012 | Patt Morrison
A computer programmed to design a promising young Republican politician would probably spit out Nathan Fletcher. Marine; Iraq combat veteran in Iraq; smart; athletic; married to a well-situated Republican; two little boys, adopted; two dogs, ditto. Perfect - except now there's no "R" after his name. Fletcher was elected to the state Assembly from San Diego County in 2008, and he is running for San Diego mayor in a nonpartisan race that is nonetheless drawing partisan lightning. Since Fletcher changed his party registration to "decline to state," which got national coverage, polls have him second in the June 5 primary, just behind openly gay Republican council member Carl DeMaio, who won the GOP endorsement over Fletcher.
NATIONAL
October 18, 2013 | By Brian Bennett and Christi Parsons
WASHINGTON - When Jeh Johnson, President Obama's pick to run the Department of Homeland Security, moved to Washington to be the top lawyer at the Pentagon in 2009, he launched a charm offensive. He began to hold regular dinners with former George W. Bush administration lawyers and Republican congressional staff. Some were held at an expensive organic restaurant called Nora in downtown D.C., recalls John B. Bellinger III, who served as legal adviser for the State Department and the National Security Council during the Bush administration.
OPINION
March 23, 2014 | Doyle McManus
Here's what the United States has done so far in an attempt to deter further Russian incursions into Ukraine: applied two rounds of economic sanctions and asked Congress to approve $1 billion in loan guarantees for Kiev. Here's what President Obama says he won't do: "We are not going to be getting into a military excursion in Ukraine," he told a television station in San Diego last week. PHOTOS: A peek inside 5 doomed dictators' opulent lifestyles The president's careful response and unwillingness to consider military intervention has met with general support from other Democrats.
NATIONAL
March 20, 2014 | By Maeve Reston
For Republicans roaring into the midterm election, the last few weeks have brought a wave of good news. President Obama's poll numbers continue to hover in the 40s. Democrats' hopes of holding the Senate look slimmer by the day. And the GOP heralded last week's win in Florida's special congressional election as evidence that their anti-Obamacare strategy is working. But some Republican strategists and donors fear that buoyant mood spells trouble for the party down the road - by masking the long-term problems that were so evident after the 2012 election.
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