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NEWS
February 2, 2012 | By Michael A. Memoli
The number of states with a clear Republican advantage doubled in 2011, part of a larger trend of states shifting into the GOP column, according to new Gallup data. Since 2008, the number of states classified as "solid Democratic" dropped from 30 to 12; 10 states are now "solid Republican," up from four. The designations are based on interviews with more than 350,000 adults in all 50 states over the course of the year. Respondents are asked whether they identify with or lean toward one party or another; states called "solidly" Democratic or Republican are those in which one party has an advantage of 10 percentage points or greater.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 2014 | By Seema Mehta
Gubernatorial candidate Neel Kashkari, who is trailing badly in the polls, said Sunday that former President George W. Bush, 2012 presidential nominee Mitt Romney and other Republican leaders are aiding his campaign. "A lot of people nationally have been helping," he told reporters after speaking to a Republican women's convention in Orange. "[Former Florida Gov.] Jeb Bush has been helping, [former Indiana Gov.] Mitch Daniels has given a lot of advice on economy policy. "President Bush has been very helpful and made calls and opened doors," Kashkari said.
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NEWS
November 7, 2012 | By Lisa Mascaro
WASHINGTON - With the concession of the Republican in the North Dakota Senate race, Democrat Heidi Heitkamp becomes the uncontested winner,  and the 20 th woman to join the upper chamber in the new Congress, setting a  record. Republican Rep. Rick Berg conceded the race Wednesday in Fargo during a luncheon meeting of party members, declining to seek a recount for the race that was decided by fewer than 3,000 votes. “We see no reason to believe that the result of this election will change over the course of the official certification process,” Berg said in a statement.
NEWS
April 25, 2014 | Lisa Mascaro, Michael Memoli
WASHINGTON -- A Republican congressman is expected to face charges in a long-running federal investigation into campaign irregularities, but will continue serving in office, his lawyer said Friday. Rep. Michael R. Grimm, a combat Marine and former FBI agent who represents Staten Island and other parts of New York, has been under investigation for more than two years in what his attorney called a "politically motivated vendetta. " "The U.S. Attorney's office has disclosed its intent to file criminal charges against Congressman Grimm," attorney William J. McGinley said in a statement.
NEWS
September 19, 2012 | By Danielle Ryan
WASHINGTON -- The House on Wednesday afternoon passed by voice vote the Republican version of the Buffett Rule. The bill, which probably won't be picked up by the Senate until after the November elections, would allow Americans to check a box on their tax forms and voluntarily donate money, in addition to their normal tax liabilities, to pay down the national debt. The original Buffett Rule, supported by President Obama, failed in the Senate in April. That bill would have required those making $1 million or more annually to pay at least 30% in taxes.
NEWS
February 13, 2012 | By David Lauter
President Obama for the first time has opened a sizable lead over his most likely Republican opponents, thanks to growing support among independent voters, according to a new Pew Research Center poll . The poll, released Monday, showed Rick Santorum in a virtual tie with Mitt Romney in the Republican presidential race. Santorum, the former Pennsylvania senator, has moved up as a result of his backing from tea party Republicans and white evangelicals. He led Romney, the former Massachusetts governor, 30% to 28% among Republican and Republican-leaning registered voters in the survey, which was conducted Feb. 8-12 and had a margin of error of 5 percentage points.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2014 | By Tony Perry
SAN DIEGO -- With more than half the votes counted Tuesday night, Councilman Kevin Faulconer had a sizable lead over Councilman David Alvarez in the special election to replace former Mayor Bob Filner. Faulconer, 47, a Republican, was leading Alvarez, 33, a Democrat, by 57% to 43% among the 166,599 ballots that were mailed in or brought to the elections' department before Tuesday's balloting. Assuming that the overall turnout is in the range of 40%, as many political pros expect, those 166,599 ballots would account for about 60% of the overall vote.
NATIONAL
February 8, 2012 | Mark Z. Barabak
The road to the Republican presidential nomination just got longer, steeper and less predictable. Mitt Romney is still the prohibitive front-runner as the race heads now to Arizona and Michigan. He alone has the financial and organizational wherewithal to stay in the race and fight in every contest through the last big day of balloting, on June 5. But by losing three out of three Tuesday contests to Rick Santorum - two of them in blowouts - Romney underlined several of the weaknesses of his candidacy, starting with his failure to connect with the GOP's most conservative voters.
OPINION
April 28, 2012 | Patt Morrison
A computer programmed to design a promising young Republican politician would probably spit out Nathan Fletcher. Marine; Iraq combat veteran in Iraq; smart; athletic; married to a well-situated Republican; two little boys, adopted; two dogs, ditto. Perfect - except now there's no "R" after his name. Fletcher was elected to the state Assembly from San Diego County in 2008, and he is running for San Diego mayor in a nonpartisan race that is nonetheless drawing partisan lightning. Since Fletcher changed his party registration to "decline to state," which got national coverage, polls have him second in the June 5 primary, just behind openly gay Republican council member Carl DeMaio, who won the GOP endorsement over Fletcher.
NATIONAL
October 18, 2013 | By Brian Bennett and Christi Parsons
WASHINGTON - When Jeh Johnson, President Obama's pick to run the Department of Homeland Security, moved to Washington to be the top lawyer at the Pentagon in 2009, he launched a charm offensive. He began to hold regular dinners with former George W. Bush administration lawyers and Republican congressional staff. Some were held at an expensive organic restaurant called Nora in downtown D.C., recalls John B. Bellinger III, who served as legal adviser for the State Department and the National Security Council during the Bush administration.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2014 | By Chris Megerian
SACRAMENTO - Gov. Jerry Brown has both Democrats and Republicans on board with the broad outlines of his plan for stockpiling some cash and paying off debt. But as the special legislative session Brown called on the issue opened Thursday, it was clear that, as lawmakers like to say, the devil could be in the details. Republicans, whose votes the Democratic governor needs to place his measure on the fall ballot, want tighter controls on the reserve fund than the governor has proposed.
NATIONAL
April 21, 2014 | By Timothy M. Phelps
WASHINGTON - For decades the Republican Party prided itself for being tough on crime, often putting Democrats on the defensive by pushing for longer, mandatory sentences for convicts. In 1988, that hard-line stance helped sink the presidential dreams of then-Massachusetts Gov. Michael Dukakis, who was blamed in Republican TV ads for having released convicted killer Willie Horton as part of a weekend furlough program. (Horton failed to return after a furlough and went on to commit robbery and rape.)
OPINION
April 20, 2014
Re "Hate without end," Opinion, April 17 The groups named by Peter Gottschalk as being responsible for widespread hate in this century are "right-wing politicians, conservative donors and professional Islamophobes. " He does not have to come right out and say "Republicans" because people have been primed by the media to associate these words with the GOP. Gottschalk gives a history of the Ku Klux Klan. He omits the fact that the Republican Party since the time of Abraham Lincoln has championed civil rights, while the Democratic Party prior to the 1960s - when it was forced to accept civil rights - has a dismal history in comparison.
OPINION
April 15, 2014 | Doyle McManus
Is Jeb Bush's moment over? Not in his mind. The former governor of Florida says he's considering a campaign to become his family's third president, even though he dreads "getting back into the vortex of the mud fight. " But as enticing as it is for the Republican establishment to contemplate the prospect of an unexpected comeback, an epic series of primary battles and a cinematic rematch between the Clinton and Bush dynasties, it's not all that likely. The Republican Party has changed dramatically since 2002, the last year Jeb Bush ran for office, and not in ways that would aid his candidacy.
OPINION
April 15, 2014 | By Lanhee J. Chen
The recent defeat of an effort to reinstitute affirmative action in admissions to California's public colleges and universities demonstrates the political power of Asian American voters and challenges the conventional wisdom about their partisan loyalties. The defeat is a reminder that Asian Americans can have a decisive impact on political and policymaking processes. Perhaps more important, it suggests that if education is a key issue that drives Asian American voters, the Democratic Party may not be able to reliably count on their support in the future.
NEWS
April 10, 2014 | By Scott Martelle
So what can we read into a name? Republican members of Congress, in search of yet another way to honor the man who led them back from the wilderness after the Nixon White House debacle, are trying to rename a mountain after Ronald Reagan. In Nevada. Which, by definition, means out in the middle of a desert , though in this case it has a nice view of Las Vegas. And it's not even like they're trying to name a whole mountain after him. They have their eyes set on a peak that's part of Frenchman Mountain . Which means, technically speaking, Reagan will be secondary to a European.
BUSINESS
March 30, 2012 | David Lazarus
One of the most striking take-aways from this week's U.S. Supreme Court hearings on the healthcare reform law was the steadfast insistence on the part of Republicans to deny affordable and accessible medical treatment to as many people as possible. The party is determined to maintain the status quo of healthcare being a privilege and not a right - putting us at odds with just about every other developed nation on the planet and, not coincidentally, resulting in about 50 million people being uninsured.
NEWS
November 17, 2009 | Dan Schnur, Dan Schnur, the director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics at USC, was communications director for then-Gov. Pete Wilson.
Almost three years ago, in the glow of a decisive reelection victory, Arnold Schwarzenegger proclaimed himself a "post-partisan" leader who would not be limited by the dogma of the two major parties. Ever since, conservative Republicans in California have quietly smoldered, avoiding open revolt against their party's nominal leader but counting the days until one of their own could replace Schwarzenegger in the governor's office. But as the field of candidates for the 2010 election begins to take shape, it is increasingly likely that the eventual Republican nominee will strongly resemble the current governor in almost everything other than the depth of his accent and the size of his biceps.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2014 | By Chris Megerian
SACRAMENTO -- Charles Munger Jr., one of California Republicans' biggest donors, is chipping in some of his wealth to ensure his party has candidates on the ballot in more Assembly districts. Several Republican candidates received Munger contributions ranging from $1,000 to $3,000, and some of them said the money helped cover the cost of filing to run in this year's election. The donations were dispersed right around the filing deadline March 7 and went to candidates in blue districts where most are facing off with Democratic incumbents.
NEWS
April 9, 2014 | By Lisa Mascaro, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
WASHINGTON - With sought-after women voters at stake, Senate Republicans blocked election-year legislation Wednesday aimed at ensuring that female workers receive equal pay for doing the same work as men. A high-profile campaign for the Paycheck Fairness Act, orchestrated by the Democratic-controlled Senate and the White House, did little to motivate Republicans in a mid-term election year when both parties are seeking women voters. Republican senators blocked the bill on a party-line filibuster, 53-44, with many waging a protest vote over party leaders' refusal to allow amendments.
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