Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRepublican Convention
IN THE NEWS

Republican Convention

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 27, 2012 | By Seema Mehta
TAMPA -- The last person many would expect to see at the Republican National Convention is the chairman of the Democrats' rival effort next week. But there was Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa on Sunday night, mixing and mingling with reporters and GOP strategists at a late-night dinner here. Villaraigosa, who will head up the Democratic National Convention next week in Charlotte, N.C., was spotted at the swanky Mise en Place supper club after dining with GOP strategist Ana Navarro.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
September 5, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
A Michigan State University professor has lost his teaching duties after telling his students in a video lecture that Republicans "raped this country," among other derogatory remarks. William Penn -- a professor in the university's creative writing program -- was featured in a YouTube video (see above) in which he told students "if you go to the Republican convention in Florida, you see all of the old Republicans with the dead skin cells washing off them. " "They are cheap.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 1988
Conrad's cartoon of Aug. 22, listing 12 Administration officials not mentioned at the Republican convention, should have been labeled "The Dirty Dozen." DOROTHY SCHULTZ San Gabriel
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2012 | By John Horn
Hollywood doesn't usually make sequels to flops, but Clint Eastwood doesn't typically follow convention. So less than two months after the actor-director's infamous “Empty Chair” speech at the Republican National Convention in Tampa, Eastwood is back supporting Gov. Mitt Romney in a new advertisement backed by the "super PAC"  American Crossroads. The new commercial, called “At Stake,” is part of a new $12.6-million ad blitz backed by conservative consultant Karl Rove's political action committee.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2012 | By Meg James
Nearly 33 million people in the U.S. watched former Mass. Gov. Mitt Romney accept his party's nomination for president on the final night of the Republican National Convention, according to ratings giant Nielsen. Among the highlights was the controversial "empty chair" presentation by actor Clint Eastwood. The numbers made Thursday the most-watched evening of the Republican convention this year. However, the audience was about 17% lower than it was four years ago when nearly 39 million viewers tuned in to see U.S. Sen. John McCain accept the Republican nomination.
NEWS
August 27, 2012 | By James Rainey
TAMPA, Fla. - Join us today for a Google + Hangout chat with Politics Now commentator James Rainey and Campaign 2012 editor Cathleen Decker at 11 a.m. PDT. As political aficionados no doubt know, what was to be the first day of the Republican National Convention - showcasing a renewed attempt by Mitt Romney to introduce himself to America - instead will be marked by a strangely abrupt opening-and-recessing ceremony at the convention arena...
NEWS
October 1, 2012 | By Patt Morrison
Republicans' current crop of "voter security" laws are Democrats' "voter suppression" laws. For several years now, Republican-led legislatures have been loud in their concerns about what amounts to a solution in search of a problem: massive, organized voter fraud in order to steal elections. Real verified instances of organized, deliberate voter fraud can likely be counted in the scores at best, and Republicans have been ardent about using the specter of the now-disbanded ACORN group to raise a national warning.
NEWS
September 28, 2012 | By Mark Z. Barabak
Beats there a Republican heart that doesn't thrill to the saga of the 1980 presidential campaign? And what a saga it is: Ronald Reagan, derided as a combination right-wing cowboy and washed-up movie actor, enters the one and only candidate debate a mere week before the election, facing all-but-certain doom against President Jimmy Carter. He then proceeds to wipe the floor of the Cleveland Convention Center with the hapless incumbent. "There you go again," he quipped, when Carter went after Reagan for alleged designs to slash Medicare.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2012 | By Geoff Boucher, Los Angeles Times
Mileage and misadventure leave their marks, but we don't always notice the damage right away. Last Monday, for instance, Clint Eastwood had a realization that stopped him in his tracks just outside his bungalow on the Warner Bros. lot. "Son of a gun," the 82-year-old muttered as he leaned over his beloved 1992 GMC Typhoon and dragged an index finger over the mysterious inch-long scratch marring the forest-green paint just above the grill. A little later, sitting among the brown-leather shadows of his office, Eastwood seemed considerably less concerned about any dents in his reputation after his eccentric, meandering speech at the Republican National Convention late last month.
NEWS
September 11, 2012 | By Lisa Mascaro
WASHINGTON - The Senate overwhelmingly advanced President Obama's Veterans Jobs Corps legislation, which would provide $1 billion over the next five years to hire post-Sept. 11, 2001-era veterans for public works jobs and give them preference for police and firefighter positions. Veterans from the 9/11 era have a consistently higher unemployment rate -   10.9% for August - than the national rate of 8.1%. Tuesday's vote to bring the bill to the Senate floor was 95-1. Democrats led the effort, which came on the 11th anniversary of the terrorist attacks.  Republicans agreed to begin debate, but it is unclear whether they will support final passage this week.
NEWS
September 10, 2012 | By David Lauter
“Don't get too worked up about the latest polling,” Mitt Romney's top pollster says in a memo   sent to reporters and the campaign's donors. “Some voters” may be experiencing a “sugar-high from the conventions,” pollster Neil Newhouse wrote. “The basic structure of the race has not changed significantly. The reality of the Obama economy will reassert itself as the ultimate downfall of the Obama Presidency.” Memos of that sort usually backfire - the fact that a campaign feels the need to publicly trumpet its lack of worry generally gets taken as evidence of the opposite.
OPINION
September 9, 2012
Like the Republican convention that preceded it, the Democratic National Convention was a combination of infomercial, revival meeting (with former President Clinton in the role of evangelist in chief) and audition for rising political stars. Also like the Republican gathering, it was predictably longer on general pronouncements than on precise policy prescriptions. Still, the convention in Charlotte, N.C., effectively dramatized important differences between the two parties and their candidates.
OPINION
September 9, 2012
Today, it is practically mandatory for the wife of a presidential candidate to address her party's political convention. But it wasn't always so. Eleanor Roosevelt was the first candidate's wife to address a political convention. That was in 1940, when her husband was running for his third term and she'd already been first lady for more than seven years. In her brief address, she never mentioned family. She spoke extemporaneously, referring to a single page of typed notes. Mamie Eisenhower was the next candidate's wife to appear at a convention, but she didn't address the delegates.
NEWS
September 8, 2012 | By James Rainey
Common sense might have told the Republicans not to send Clint Eastwood - probably about five decades past his last improv class - on stage last week at their national convention. With no script, no plan and an empty chair as his only animating principle, the Hollywoodicon made quite a muddle. It turns out at least one of the television networks warned organizers of the Republican convention that they were bucking tradition - and losing the chance to present a Mitt Romney biographical video - by devoting a precious chunk of prime time to Eastwood.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|