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Republican Convention

NEWS
September 8, 2012 | By David Lauter
President Obama's post-convention “bounce” continued to grow Saturday, as new polls showed him widening a lead over Republican nominee Mitt Romney. Obama's lead over Romney among registered voters grew to 49%-45% in Gallup's tracking poll . The 49% for Obama was his highest point in the survey since late April. It represented an increase of 1 point since Friday and a 5-point swing from Romney's 47%-46% lead in the Gallup survey just before the Republican convention began.
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NEWS
September 8, 2012 | By James Rainey
Common sense might have told the Republicans not to send Clint Eastwood - probably about five decades past his last improv class - on stage last week at their national convention. With no script, no plan and an empty chair as his only animating principle, the Hollywoodicon made quite a muddle. It turns out at least one of the television networks warned organizers of the Republican convention that they were bucking tradition - and losing the chance to present a Mitt Romney biographical video - by devoting a precious chunk of prime time to Eastwood.
NEWS
September 7, 2012 | By David Lauter
The August jobs report, showing another month of slow growth, likely will dampen whatever bounce President Obama might have achieved from his party's convention. Unlike jobs reports earlier in the year, which may have had a stronger political punch, the current report probably will not have a major effect. The number of new jobs, 96,000 after the Bureau of Labor Statistics' usual seasonal adjustments, fell below the consensus expectations of economists but did not provide the sort of dramatic news -- good or bad -- that would be likely to change the way most voters see the current economy.
NEWS
September 7, 2012 | By Robin Abcarian
CHARLOTTE, N.C. -- After sequestering himself in Vermont while Democrats renominated Barack Obama here this week, Republican nominee Mitt Romney hit the campaign trail Friday and pronounced himself disappointed in the president's acceptance speech and in a lackluster August jobs report. Romney also battled back critiques  that the Republican convention in Tampa had slighted the military and failed to mention the war in Afghanistan.  “This is a very disappointing time for the American people,” he told Fox News while stumping in Iowa.
NEWS
September 7, 2012 | By Mitchell Landsberg
In the end, there was Cardinal Timothy Dolan, the Roman Catholic archbishop of New York whose benedictions closed out both the Republican and Democratic national conventions . His words to the two parties mostly covered the same ground, sometimes in identical language. But there were some rather striking differences, underlining the church's sharp disagreements with the Democratic Party over abortion and same-sex marriage, among other issues. Dolan, who has not been shy about expressing his unhappiness with the Obama administration, seemed to be chiding the Democrats over their support of same-sex marriage when he said: "Show us anew that happiness is found only in respecting the laws of nature and of nature's God.  Empower us with your grace so that we might resist the temptation to replace the moral law with idols of our own making, or to remake those institutions you have given us for the nurturing of life and community.
NATIONAL
September 7, 2012 | By Robin Abcarian, Los Angeles Times
CHARLOTTE, N.C. - Where but the women's caucus of the Democratic National Convention would someone compare Mitt Romney to an expensive but unwearable shoe? On Thursday morning, party activist Jehmu Greene told hundreds of delegates that she had packed all kinds of fancy high heels for Charlotte, but had worn only one pair of shoes: her comfortable tennies. The "pretty shoes" she never wore, she said, reminded her of the Republican presidential nominee. "In Tampa, they tried to put a nice little package on him, tried to make him seem so yummy, so desirable.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2012 | By Meredith Blake
After bringing down the house Tuesday night at the Democratic National Convention, First Lady Michelle Obama popped up Wednesday on “The Late Show” to deliver the Top 10 list, marking her fourth appearance on the show and her second time in just the past week. The list itself, “Top 10 reasons to watch the Democratic National Convention,” included a few good lines (No. 3: “It's got to be better than what you're watching now”) as well as some groaners (No. 10: Spoiler alert: The Democrats will nominate Barack Obama”)
NEWS
September 6, 2012 | By Mark Z. Barabak
CHARLOTTE, N.C. - President Obama will be the headliner at his own show Thursday night as the Democratic National Convention wraps up with a prime-time speech from the incumbent accepting his nomination for a second term. After three days of speeches from the president's wife, his Democratic predecessor and scores of party compatriots and other validators, a national TV audience will hear Obama say in his own words why he deserves another four years in the White House despite the economic difficulties the country continues to face.
NATIONAL
September 6, 2012 | By Matea Gold and Melanie Mason, Los Angeles Times
CHARLOTTE, N.C. - When Democratic Party leaders began planning the 2012 national convention, they vowed to put it on without the help of corporations, lobbyists and political action committees who have traditionally helped finance the multiday extravaganzas, relying instead on small donations to pay for a "people's convention. " But corporate money maintained a persistent presence here this week. "Thank you to all of our corporate sponsors," read a large white banner at the CarolinaFest street fair that kicked off the convention.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2012 | By Mary McNamara, Television Critic
In the days and hours leading up to Bill Clinton's address before the 2012 Democratic National Convention, many analysts opined that the former president was there to remind the faithful what it means to be a Democrat. Wednesday's convention made that task a little easier. It was a day ruled by in-house arguments over the inclusion of God and the designation of Jerusalem as the capital of Israel in the party platform, a day in which the warm-up speeches were given by an assortment of characters including activist nun Sister Simone Campbell, Rush Limbaugh slander victim Sandra Fluke and senatorial candidate Elizabeth Warren, the party's current plain-spoken darling.
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