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Republican Debates

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NATIONAL
February 29, 2008 | Don Frederick
They've been the political equivalent of a long-running road show -- 20 debates, starting last spring, among the Democratic presidential candidates, and 16 featuring the Republican contenders. But the GOP players appear to have ended their engagements, and Tuesday's results in Ohio and Texas could bring down the curtain for the Democrats. Here's what we've learned: * Hillary Rodham Clinton and pre-cooked barbs are not a good match.
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NATIONAL
February 6, 2013 | By Brian Bennett, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Influential House Republicans, adopting a distinctly more conciliatory approach to immigration reform since the November election, are seriously considering ways to give legal status to illegal immigrants. The push by President Obama and a high-profile group of senators to create a pathway to citizenship has met stiff resistance from conservatives in the GOP-led House. And their intense opposition could undermine efforts to find a compromise that can pass the House. But party leaders have encouraged a secretive bipartisan group to work on a deal and have spoken openly about their support for reform.
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NATIONAL
October 20, 2007
The Republican presidential candidates will debate Sunday at the Rosen Shingle Creek resort in Orlando, Fla. Fox News will broadcast the 90-minute forum beginning at 5 p.m.
NATIONAL
January 23, 2012 | By Mark Z. Barabak and Seema Mehta, Los Angeles Times
Standing face to face, Mitt Romney and Newt Gingrich traded barbs over honesty and integrity in an acrimonious debate that opened a fierce fight ahead of Florida's crucial presidential primary. After days of hurling insults long-distance and over the airwaves, the two wasted little time engaging in person Monday night, turning the opening exchange into a testy back-and-forth over who was more electable. "They're not sending somebody to Washington to manage the decay," Gingrich said, reprising a line he has used before to belittle Romney as a passionless Mr. Fix-It.
NEWS
May 27, 1992 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Militant advocates on both sides of the abortion issue clashed Tuesday at Republican Party platform hearings here, with the prospective presidential candidacy of Ross Perot adding new complexity to the political factors that have shaped the decades-long controversy over constitutional rights and moral principles.
NEWS
May 4, 2011 | By Matea Gold, Washington Bureau
Organizers of the first GOP primary debate for the 2012 presidential race managed to qualify five candidates to participate in the forum Thursday night , though most of the Republicans considered top contenders for the presidential nomination will not be in attendance. The most prominent candidate who will take part in the debate, held at the Peace Center in Greenville, S.C., will be former Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty. He will be joined by former Sen. Rick Santorum of Pennsylvania, Rep. Ron Paul of Texas, restaurant executive Herman Cain and former New Mexico Gov. Gary Johnson.
NATIONAL
January 20, 2012 | By David Horsey
When Newt Gingrich tore into CNN's John King for kicking off Thursday night's presidential debate with a question about his embittered second ex-wife, it was reality TV at its finest. The long series of debates among the Republican candidates has been one of the most unexpectedly influential factors in the current campaign. If not for the debates, Gingrich -- who is so good at them - would be back to spouting his big thoughts on Fox. Rick Perry -- who is embarrassingly bad at them -- would be one of the final four candidates instead of the latest to drop out. The appeal of the debates to a surprisingly large audience has to do with far more than civic engagement.
NEWS
December 8, 1999 | From a Times Staff Writer
The Republican presidential debate on Monday night--the first televised forum in which the candidates questioned one another--drew slightly more viewers than any of the previous four debates in the 2000 campaign, according to industry estimates. About 2 million people watched the debate among the six major Republican presidential candidates, which was broadcast from Phoenix on CNN.
NATIONAL
April 30, 2009 | James Oliphant
Sen. Arlen Specter received a hero's welcome at the White House on Wednesday, while the Republican Party he left behind continued to grapple with the implications of his defection. Specter stunned his colleagues Tuesday by announcing he would run as a Democrat in next year's Pennsylvania Senate primary, further decimating the ranks of a party whose popularity has been waning in recent years.
NATIONAL
February 6, 2013 | By Brian Bennett, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Influential House Republicans, adopting a distinctly more conciliatory approach to immigration reform since the November election, are seriously considering ways to give legal status to illegal immigrants. The push by President Obama and a high-profile group of senators to create a pathway to citizenship has met stiff resistance from conservatives in the GOP-led House. And their intense opposition could undermine efforts to find a compromise that can pass the House. But party leaders have encouraged a secretive bipartisan group to work on a deal and have spoken openly about their support for reform.
NATIONAL
January 20, 2012 | By David Horsey
When Newt Gingrich tore into CNN's John King for kicking off Thursday night's presidential debate with a question about his embittered second ex-wife, it was reality TV at its finest. The long series of debates among the Republican candidates has been one of the most unexpectedly influential factors in the current campaign. If not for the debates, Gingrich -- who is so good at them - would be back to spouting his big thoughts on Fox. Rick Perry -- who is embarrassingly bad at them -- would be one of the final four candidates instead of the latest to drop out. The appeal of the debates to a surprisingly large audience has to do with far more than civic engagement.
NATIONAL
January 7, 2012 | By Paul West and Seema Mehta, Los Angeles Times
Moving to grab a clear lead in the Republican presidential contest, Mitt Romney remained above the fray in a televised debate as his opponents chose to badger one another, rather than take on the front-runner. With the New Hampshire primary three days away — and Romney holding a commanding lead there, as well as in next-up South Carolina — time is running out for someone to slow Romney's progress. But his rivals' decision to fight among themselves revived a pattern that has worked to Romney's advantage — assuming the role of unofficial nominee and focusing his attacks on President Obama.
NEWS
December 15, 2011 | By Michael A. Memoli
Tonight's presidential debate in Iowa -- the last such meeting before the first votes are cast in the GOP nominating race -- may be the best chance the candidates get to make a convincing closing argument to voters. After the event, broadcast on the Fox News Channel starting at 9 p.m. EST, there will be just two full weeks of retail campaigning sandwiched around an expected Christmas cease-fire. But given how the race has been heavily influenced by the dozen televised forums, this may be the last real opportunity for a narrative-changing moment to take hold.
NEWS
November 9, 2011 | By Michael A. Memoli
Answering a charge that's at the root of his campaign's inability to break out from the Republican field, Mitt Romney rejected the notion that he's a candidate without a core at the start of tonight's presidential debate. Romney was first asked to explain his view on the government's rescue plan for the auto industry so important to the economy of Michigan, the site of the ninth debate of the primary season. The son of the state's former governor said he cared about the auto industry unlike any other candidate on stage.
OPINION
October 25, 2011 | By Jorge G. Castañeda
The threat by six Republican presidential candidates to boycott a Florida debate speaks to a deep divide among Latinos in the United States. And it doesn't bode well for the future of immigration reform, either. The debate was being planned for late January by Univision, the largest Spanish-language television network in the United States (and the fourth-largest network overall in the country). But that was before a blowup between the network and U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.), a Cuban American and one of the country's few prominent Latino Republicans.
NATIONAL
October 19, 2011 | By Robin Abcarian, Los Angeles Times
If the Shoulder Touch on the Strip had occurred in a Las Vegas bar, it might have had a different, perhaps bloodier, outcome. But while Mitt Romney's reach-and-grab of Rick Perry sparked no fisticuffs, it served as a visual metaphor for an unusually feisty Republican presidential debate. It also had observers split Wednesday over what former Massachusetts Gov. Romney, whose wingspan is impressive, was really trying to communicate — both to his Texas rival and to the 5.5 million viewers who watched the CNN debate.
NATIONAL
September 13, 2011 | By Paul West, Washington Bureau
A 2007 executive order by Texas Gov. Rick Perry has become the latest post-debate headache for the Republican presidential front-runner, who was accused of "crony capitalism" Tuesday by Rep. Michele Bachmann. The fight over requiring vaccinations for young girls — which surfaced in Monday's Florida debate — involved government prerogatives and cancer. But it also had a strong moral subtext: Bachmann and other social conservatives objected to forcible inoculations against a disease spread by sexual activity, while Perry defended himself with the language of the antiabortion movement.
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