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NEWS
May 18, 2003 | John Hendren, Times Staff Writer
The No. 10 most-wanted Iraqi official surrendered Saturday, as U.S. military officials launched half a dozen overnight raids and stationed soldiers at gas stations in a high-profile campaign to battle lawlessness on the streets. Gen. Kamal Mustafa Abdallah Sultan Tikriti, who as secretary-general was the top leader of the elite Republican Guard military units, surrendered to U.S. forces in Baghdad, defense officials said.
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WORLD
July 8, 2013 | By Jeffrey Fleishman
CAIRO -- The shooting started during morning prayers. Soldiers and security forces opened fire on an encampment of anti-military protesters outside the barricades at the Republican Guard headquarters. Witnesses said demonstrators fled through tear gas and shotgun pellets, the dead and wounded ferried away by motorcycles, ambulances and in the arms of relatives. "We were praying, and at 3:30 a.m. we were surprised by gun fire and tear gas all around us,” said Mahmoud Mohamed, a lawyer who was shot in the arm. "We had women and children with us. The shooting went on for a long time.
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NEWS
February 20, 1991 | HARRY G. SUMMERS Jr.
Saddam Hussein thought he had it all figured out. As he had against the Iranian army, he would entrench his army in strong fortified positions, keeping his best and most mobile forces in reserve at the rear. When the enemy attacked, he would let the assault develop, even let the enemy make initial penetrations of his front lines, until it was clear which were feints and demonstrations, which were secondary attacks--and which was the "real" main attack.
WORLD
July 8, 2013 | By Jeffrey Fleishman
CAIRO -- The political wing of the Muslim Brotherhood called for a national uprising in retaliation for an attack by Egyptian security forces Monday that killed at least 42 anti-military protesters during morning prayers. The Freedom and Justice Party “calls on the great Egyptian people to rise up against those who want to steal their revolution with tanks and armored vehicles, even over the dead bodies of the people," it said in a statement. The announcement was a chilling indication of how polarized and dangerous the nation has become in a power struggle between the armed forces and the supporters of former President Mohamed Morsi, a Brotherhood member who last week was deposed in a military coup.
NEWS
March 28, 2003 | Paul Richter and John Hendren, Times Staff Writers
U.S. forces are poised to begin the battle for Baghdad by pounding Republican Guard troops on the southern perimeter of the Iraqi capital, hoping that with a crushing blow they can demoralize the remaining forces and avoid a bloody urban battle of attrition. After a week of breakneck advance and skirmishing, about 75,000 U.S. troops are confronting about 35,000 Iraq soldiers arrayed in three Republican Guard divisions south of the city.
NEWS
March 6, 1991 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
About 30 Western journalists have not been heard from, and concern rose Tuesday that they have been taken captive in troubled southeastern Iraq by members of the defeated Republican Guard, U.S. officials and news organizations said. Most of the reporters, including about 11 Americans, left Kuwait Sunday and Monday in a caravan in hopes of reaching some of the dozen-or-so towns in southern Iraq where anti-Saddam Hussein demonstrations are said to be growing.
NEWS
March 6, 1991 | KIM MURPHY and MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Thousands of refugees fled worsening violence in southern Iraq on Tuesday as Republican Guard tank and infantry brigades loyal to Iraqi President Saddam Hussein blasted their way into rebellious districts of Basra, the country's second-largest city. As the regime began its counterattack in the widespread, three-day-old popular revolt--sparked by its bitter defeat in Kuwait at the hands of the U.S.
NEWS
February 27, 1991 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Coalition forces crushed resistance around Kuwait city and cut off the main body of Iraq's elite Republican Guard on Tuesday as Saddam Hussein's armies reeled and fled before a massive allied air and land offensive. "The Iraqi army is in full retreat, although there is some fighting going on," Lt. Gen. Thomas W. Kelly, chief of operations for the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said in Washington. "Tomorrow, when the sun comes up, the question in my mind is whether the enemy is going to be there."
NEWS
January 22, 1991 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the vast sands of nothingness to the north, they lay in wait, stropping their steel and thirsting for the blood of young Americans. Just mention of Saddam Hussein's Republican Guards sends a bolt of fear through the Persian Gulf. Each big war has its monster. This war's is Saddam Hussein. And each monster breathes his own kind of fire. Hussein's fire is his Republican Guard, 10 or maybe 11 divisions strong.
NEWS
February 27, 1991 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. Marines entered the capital of Kuwait, and coalition forces cut off the main body of Iraq's elite Republican Guard on Tuesday as Saddam Hussein's armies reeled and fled before a massive allied air and land offensive. "The Iraqi army is in full retreat, although there is some fighting going on," Lt. Gen. Thomas W. Kelly, chief of operations for the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said in Washington. "Tomorrow, when the sun comes up, the question in my mind is whether the enemy is going to be there."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 2012 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
Gen. H. Norman Schwarzkopf, who presided over the swift and devastating 1991 military assault on Iraq that transformed the Middle East and reminded America what it was like to win a war, died Thursday of complications from pneumonia. He was 78. The former four-star general, whose burly image towering in camouflage fatigues above his troops came to define both Operation Desert Storm and the nation's renewed sense of military pride, had been living in relatively quiet retirement in Tampa, Fla., eschewing the political battles that continued to broil over a part of the world he had left as a conqueror.
WORLD
July 7, 2012 | By Patrick J. McDonnell and Alexandra Sandels, Los Angeles Times
BEIRUT - They were close friends and shared a singular lineage: Both were blood royalty of the Syrian leadership caste, birthright beneficiaries of their fathers' stranglehold on the nation. But the conflict tearing Syrian apart also opened a deep rift between President Bashar Assad and Brig. Gen. Manaf Tlas, a brigade commander in the country's ultra-loyal Republican Guard. On Friday,France's foreign minister confirmed that Tlas had defected. Tlas' departure from the Assad administration is the highest-profile to date, and many read the move as a sign that even Assad's inner circle is losing faith after 16 months of fighting, a savaged economy and international opprobrium.
WORLD
May 3, 2004 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
Iraqi Maj. Gen. Jassim Mohammed Saleh consolidated his military role Sunday, even as Shiites, Kurds and the top U.S. general in Washington questioned whether he was the man to lead Iraqi troops in this predominantly Sunni city. As residents began to pour back to their homes, U.S. Marine and Iraqi brass said that the transfer of responsibility for providing security to this beleaguered city was going smoothly. "We are doing very well," Saleh said after his daily meeting with Marine officers.
WORLD
August 11, 2003 | David Zucchino, Times Staff Writer
Saddam Hussein and his son Qusai crippled the Iraqi military through a multitude of erratic orders and strategic miscalculations, while its fighting units barely communicated with one another and were paralyzed from lack of direction, according to detailed interviews with more than a dozen former Iraqi commanders and servicemen.
NEWS
May 18, 2003 | John Hendren, Times Staff Writer
The No. 10 most-wanted Iraqi official surrendered Saturday, as U.S. military officials launched half a dozen overnight raids and stationed soldiers at gas stations in a high-profile campaign to battle lawlessness on the streets. Gen. Kamal Mustafa Abdallah Sultan Tikriti, who as secretary-general was the top leader of the elite Republican Guard military units, surrendered to U.S. forces in Baghdad, defense officials said.
NEWS
April 25, 2003 | From a Times Staff Writer
Alerted by an Iraqi who said he had worked for Baath Party and Republican Guard officials, U.S. troops Thursday discovered thousands of documents describing war plans, computer security and military bonuses. The Iraqi led a U.S. special operations team to safes and a document-storage area in buildings once occupied by senior Iraqi military and government officials.
NEWS
February 26, 1991 | TRACY WILKINSON and NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Iraqi President Saddam Hussein's government ordered its forces to withdraw from Kuwait as allied troops pushed farther into Iraq and the occupied nation of Kuwait today in the third day of a massive ground offensive. The White House turned a cold shoulder to the withdrawal announcement broadcast over Baghdad Radio. "The war goes on," said President Bush's press secretary, Marlin Fitzwater. Fitzwater said the Iraqi government had made no "authoritative contact" with either the U.S.
NEWS
February 26, 1991 | TRACY WILKINSON and NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Iraqi President Saddam Hussein's government ordered its forces to withdraw from Kuwait as allied troops pushed farther into Iraq and the occupied nation of Kuwait today in the third day of a massive ground offensive. But the White House turned a cold shoulder to the withdrawal announcement broadcast over Baghdad Radio. "We continue to prosecute the war. We have heard no reason to change that," President Bush's press secretary, Marlin Fitzwater, told reporters. Before the U.N.
OPINION
April 22, 2003
"Soldiers Stumble on Outrageous Fortune," April 19: American soldiers uncovered an estimated $650 million believed to have been hoarded by senior members of the Baath Party and the Republican Guard. A U.S. Treasury official assured Iraq that "any assets belonging to Saddam Hussein and his cronies will be returned to the Iraqi people." For an economy in ruins, that money is a godsend. The recovered loot should just about cover the down payments to Bechtel and Halliburton for rebuilding infrastructure destroyed by American missiles.
NEWS
April 7, 2003 | David Zucchino, Times Staff Writer
Seated inside his command-post tent Sunday near the intersection of two Baghdad highways, Col. David Perkins spread the laminated map before him. With grease pencils, he and his top aides plotted the positions of American troops and enemy defenses. Baghdad was surrounded. Iraq's political and military power structures are growing weaker by the day. The regime of Saddam Hussein can no longer protect the capital. If U.S.
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