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Republican Guard Iraq

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NEWS
February 27, 1991 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By throwing the heaviest concentration of armor since World War II against Saddam Hussein's vaunted Republican Guard, trapping it between a lethal "hammer and anvil," allied forces have launched the climactic battle of the Persian Gulf War. The engagement is the centerpiece of Operation Desert Storm, the objective of a seven-month political and military campaign that began Aug. 6 when the United States dispatched the first squadron of fighter planes to Saudi Arabia, U.S. officials said Tuesday.
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NEWS
July 3, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
An exiled Iraqi dissident group said Thursday that disgruntled members of the Republican Guard had mounted a coup attempt earlier this week against President Saddam Hussein, but the reports were disputed by other exiled Iraqis and some U.S. officials. The incident was first reported by the Associated Press, which cited a fax it had received from the London-based Iraqi National Congress, a dissident organization. The group said that a mechanized brigade, commanded by Brig. Gen.
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NEWS
February 28, 1991 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The battle plan for vanquishing the Iraqi army mapped out by Gen. H. Norman Schwarzkopf was one of the most complex military campaigns ever devised, yet it rested upon a fundamental principle as old as human conflict--deception. From the opening minutes of the air war in the pre-dawn hours of Jan.
NEWS
March 31, 1991 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shocked by the savagery of Saddam Hussein's repression of the uprising against him in southern Iraq, American troops manning the Persian Gulf War's long cease-fire line say they would willingly fight their way north to Baghdad to topple the Iraqi dictator. This attitude was repeatedly evident to a reporter who spent several days touring the U.S.-occupied zone, an area embracing more than 15% of the country.
NEWS
February 28, 1991 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
American tank crews, on the attack in one of the biggest armored battles since World War II, were ordered today to halt offensive fire against badly mauled Republican Guard tank divisions in southeastern Iraq. The order to American troops came eight hours after as many as 800 tanks from the 1st and 3rd Armored divisions of the U.S. Army's VII Corps were reported battling two armored divisions of the Republican Guard about 50 miles west of the city of Basra.
NEWS
February 27, 1991 | MELISSA HEALY and EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein warned that it would be the "mother of all battles." Instead, it has become the "mother of all surrenders." After months of allied concern over Iraq's battle-hardened million-man army, thousands of tanks and artillery pieces, chemical weapons and fearsome defenses, the attack against Iraqi forces by the 28-country U.N. coalition appears to have turned into a full-fledged rout.
NEWS
February 10, 1991 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Allied commanders are discounting earlier fears that Saddam Hussein has adopted a rope-a-dope strategy--absorbing heavy blows in order to marshal his dug-in forces for the "real" war--and now believe Iraq is incapable of initiating and sustaining a major offensive. They do not discount the possibility that Iraq might launch a major human-wave attack on U.S.
NEWS
March 1, 1991 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Iraqi President Saddam Hussein maintained his tight veil of secrecy and control over a war-ravaged nation on Thursday, proclaiming that President Bush had ordered a halt in hostilities only after Iraq's Republican Guard had "broken the backbone" of the coalition in fierce combat near Basra.
NEWS
January 31, 1991 | MELISSA HEALY and JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Although the most intensive air campaign in history has won the U.S.-led coalition unchallenged mastery of the skies over Iraq and Kuwait, it remains unclear how much the more than 15,000 bombing runs have hurt Iraq's ground-fighting capability. Enemy troops "certainly have a lot of fight left in them," said Gen. H. Norman Schwarzkopf on Wednesday.
NEWS
February 20, 1991 | HARRY G. SUMMERS Jr.
Saddam Hussein thought he had it all figured out. As he had against the Iranian army, he would entrench his army in strong fortified positions, keeping his best and most mobile forces in reserve at the rear. When the enemy attacked, he would let the assault develop, even let the enemy make initial penetrations of his front lines, until it was clear which were feints and demonstrations, which were secondary attacks--and which was the "real" main attack.
NEWS
March 26, 1991 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saddam Hussein's troops have massacred Iraqi women and children and shelled civilian neighborhoods and are rounding up and executing males over age 15 in the wake of a failed rebellion in southern Iraq, terrified refugees said Monday. Thousands of ragged refugees flooded roads near here, 120 miles northwest of Iraq's border with Kuwait, and swamped U.S. military checkpoints, begging to be given political asylum or to be taken as prisoners of war to escape the wave of terror.
NEWS
March 11, 1991 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Widespread rebellion and unrest in Iraq chewed Sunday at President Saddam Hussein's reins of authority, threatening the major oil center of Kirkuk in the north and sending a postwar flood of refugees over the Iranian border in the south, according to rebel leaders in exile. Sheik Abu Maitham Saghir, an Islamic fundamentalist, claimed in Beirut on Sunday that the uprising against Hussein's rule now involved 29 major Iraqi cities and had spread over three-quarters of Iraqi territory.
NEWS
March 6, 1991 | KIM MURPHY and MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Thousands of refugees fled worsening violence in southern Iraq on Tuesday as Republican Guard tank and infantry brigades loyal to Iraqi President Saddam Hussein blasted their way into rebellious districts of Basra, the country's second-largest city. As the regime began its counterattack in the widespread, three-day-old popular revolt--sparked by its bitter defeat in Kuwait at the hands of the U.S.
NEWS
March 6, 1991 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
About 30 Western journalists have not been heard from, and concern rose Tuesday that they have been taken captive in troubled southeastern Iraq by members of the defeated Republican Guard, U.S. officials and news organizations said. Most of the reporters, including about 11 Americans, left Kuwait Sunday and Monday in a caravan in hopes of reaching some of the dozen-or-so towns in southern Iraq where anti-Saddam Hussein demonstrations are said to be growing.
NEWS
March 5, 1991 | BOB DROGIN and MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Rebelling civilians have emptied political prisons and executed loyalists of Iraqi President Saddam Hussein in a popular fundamentalist Islamic uprising that has spread anarchy across southern Iraq in the last four days, according to refugees who reached here Monday. Foes of the Iraqi president have taken control of seven major cities south of Baghdad in a growing threat to Iraq's dictatorial regime, the refugees said.
NEWS
March 1, 1991 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Iraqi President Saddam Hussein maintained his tight veil of secrecy and control over a war-ravaged nation on Thursday, proclaiming that President Bush had ordered a halt in hostilities only after Iraq's Republican Guard had "broken the backbone" of the coalition in fierce combat near Basra.
NEWS
February 26, 1991 | TRACY WILKINSON and NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Iraqi President Saddam Hussein's government ordered its forces to withdraw from Kuwait as allied troops pushed farther into Iraq and the occupied nation of Kuwait today in the third day of a massive ground offensive. But the White House turned a cold shoulder to the withdrawal announcement broadcast over Baghdad Radio. "We continue to prosecute the war. We have heard no reason to change that," President Bush's press secretary, Marlin Fitzwater, told reporters. Before the U.N.
NEWS
March 11, 1991 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Widespread rebellion and unrest in Iraq chewed Sunday at President Saddam Hussein's reins of authority, threatening the major oil center of Kirkuk in the north and sending a postwar flood of refugees over the Iranian border in the south, according to rebel leaders in exile. Sheik Abu Maitham Saghir, an Islamic fundamentalist, claimed in Beirut on Sunday that the uprising against Hussein's rule now involved 29 major Iraqi cities and had spread over three-quarters of Iraqi territory.
NEWS
March 1, 1991 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
During the 16-hour battle, the arid Iraqi desert floor was thick with fire and thunder as U.S. tanks, artillery, attack helicopters and fixed-wing aircraft threw everything they had at Saddam Hussein's Republican Guard. And when his vaunted troops finally began a desperate but surprisingly hasty retreat toward Basra--with their remaining tanks loaded onto giant flatbed trucks--U.S. forces pursued them with a vengeance, picking off so many tanks that one pilot later called it a turkey-shoot.
NEWS
March 1, 1991 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The bodies were found lying in trenches, buried in collapsed bunkers, incinerated in tanks and armored cars. In Kuwait and southern Iraq, tens of thousands of Iraqi soldiers--elite Republican Guards, as well as ordinary conscripts sent to the front to slow the allied march--were left where they were killed during six weeks of war.
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