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NEWS
June 14, 2000 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of the most feared of a newly popular breed of secret political groups is launching its first public attack, going after a member of Congress from New York who switched parties last year and now is a Democrat. Beginning today, an unusual campaign funded by unknown sources will tell voters that they should vote against Michael P. Forbes because, in essence, he once was such a good Republican.
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NEWS
June 14, 2000 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of the most feared of a newly popular breed of secret political groups is launching its first public attack, going after a member of Congress from New York who switched parties last year and now is a Democrat. Beginning today, an unusual campaign funded by unknown sources will tell voters that they should vote against Michael P. Forbes because, in essence, he once was such a good Republican.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 2000
In the murky world of campaign finance, one loophole seems to lead to another. The latest tactic is to create political committees that exploit an intersection of the federal tax code and federal election law. The beauty of this lawyer's delight is that anyone can contribute thousands of dollars anonymously to the tax-exempt committees. This defies the most basic of all campaign finance principles: that the citizens deserve, at the least, to know who is financing powerful election organizations.
NEWS
May 28, 2000 | From Reuters
U.S. corporations and trade groups are using an obscure tax loophole to keep political contributions secret, Newsweek magazine reported Saturday. The magazine notes that by registering with the Internal Revenue Service under Section 527 of the tax code, an organization can set up a political committee that need not report its activities to the Federal Election Commission. The article, to appear in the issue of Newsweek on sale Monday, says "lawyers for the liberal Sierra Club stumbled on . . .
NEWS
June 9, 2000 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Senate, pushed by former Republican presidential candidate John McCain, approved a measure Thursday that would force stealth political committees to disclose their donors and expenditures.
NEWS
June 28, 2000 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House unexpectedly passed legislation early this morning to require the disclosure of secret donors and expenditures by tax-exempt political committees, clearing the way for Congress to pass substantive campaign finance reform for the first time in a quarter century. The surprising 385-to-39 approval of the reform measure capped weeks of negotiations and changes in the legislation by some House Republican leaders intended to derail it.
NEWS
February 17, 2002 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN and MEGAN GARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
For the 2000 elections, Vinod Gupta, a high-tech mogul from Omaha, donated more than $1.2 million to Democratic Party causes and candidates. As thanks, he had lunch with President Clinton and a few other big donors at Barbra Streisand's cliff-top Malibu estate. He hobnobbed with Brad Pitt and other movie stars at a steady stream of parties. Over the years, he has shared his opinions with presidents and with members of Congress.
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