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NEWS
January 25, 2014 | By Scott Martelle
Remember 2011-12, when the Republicans had a village of presidential candidates who went through what seemed like a basketball season's worth of debates and state contests before they finally settled on the guy they were going to settle on all along, Mitt Romney? Yeah. Some of us are still recovering. The Republican National Committee apparently learned a lesson from that, so it decided Friday to truncate the 2016 nominating schedule, with an eye toward holding the national convention in June or July instead of late August, as in the last cycle.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 29, 2014 | By Cathleen Decker
Like almost all of the State of the Union speeches before it, Tuesday's was visually dominated by men: The television screen filled most of the time with President Obama and Vice President Joe Biden in dark suits and medium-blue ties; next to Biden, Republican House Speaker John A. Boehner, in a dark suit and pale green tie. Occasionally, the camera would move to the audience, more mixed but still suffused with dark suits. Only during Nancy Pelosi's brief tenure as House speaker, when she was one of the big three dominating the screen, has it been any different.
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NATIONAL
March 18, 2013 | By Paul West, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - The Republican Party is smug. Uncaring. Rigid. An immovable collection of "stuffy old men. " The assessment did not come from Democrats still gleeful about November's victory - the fifth time Republicans have lost the popular vote in the last six presidential elections. It came from the Republican Party itself. An unflinching analysis commissioned by the Republican National Committee and released Monday said female, minority and younger voters have been alienated by what they see as the GOP's stale policies and image of intolerance.
NEWS
January 28, 2014 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON -- Republicans accused of waging a "war on women" attempted to send a message to the nation with the selection of Washington state Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers, the top woman in GOP leadership and a mother of three, to deliver the party's response Tuesday night to President Obama's State of the Union address. The House GOP, though, will send another message just hours before the president visits the House chamber -- voting on a bill called the No Taxpayer Funding for Abortions Act, which seeks to expand a prohibition on the use of federal dollars to pay for abortions.
NATIONAL
April 11, 2013 | By Seema Mehta and Maeve Reston, Los Angeles Times
Republican leaders on Thursday focused on one of the most pressing challenges the party faces as it strives to retake the White House in 2016 - its deep and persistent unpopularity among crucial voting groups, such as Latinos and single women. Speaker after speaker told members of the Republican National Committee, meeting in Hollywood, that the party and its candidates needed to be part of those communities not just when elections near, that they needed to highlight areas of shared interest and that they must promote minority and women candidates among their ranks.
NATIONAL
May 11, 2009 | Paul West
Michael S. Steele completed his first 100 days as Republican national chairman this weekend, but the party let the milestone pass without notice. Steele made history in January as the first African American to head the Republican National Committee. It's been largely downhill since, with Republicans in disarray and Steele under siege over a variety of problems, many self-inflicted.
NATIONAL
March 3, 2009 | Peter Nicholas
The Obama White House has begun advancing an aggressive political strategy: persuading the country that real power behind the Republican Party is not the GOP leaders in Congress or at the Republican National Committee, but rather provocative radio talk show king Rush Limbaugh. President Obama himself, along with top aides and outside Democratic allies, have been pushing the message in unison.
NATIONAL
October 24, 2006 | Peter Wallsten, Times Staff Writer
A new Republican Party television ad featuring a scantily clad white woman winking and inviting a black candidate to "call me" is drawing charges of race-baiting, with critics saying it contradicts a landmark GOP statement last year that the party was wrong in past decades to use racial appeals to win support from white voters.
NATIONAL
October 28, 2008 | Peter Wallsten, Wallsten is a Times staff writer.
The social conservatives and moderates who together boosted the Republican Party to dominance have begun a tense battle over the future of the GOP, with social conservatives already moving to seize control of the party's machinery and some vowing to limit John McCain's influence, even if he wins the presidency.
NEWS
May 7, 1994 | Reuters
Former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke said Friday that he would stop using the name "Conservative Republican National Committee" in his fund-raising efforts to avoid threatened legal action by the Republican National Committee. Republican National Committee Chairman Haley Barbour sent Duke a letter Tuesday threatening to sue him for violating consumer-protection laws and to prohibit him from using the name. Barbour said the name was misleading.
NEWS
January 25, 2014 | By Scott Martelle
Remember 2011-12, when the Republicans had a village of presidential candidates who went through what seemed like a basketball season's worth of debates and state contests before they finally settled on the guy they were going to settle on all along, Mitt Romney? Yeah. Some of us are still recovering. The Republican National Committee apparently learned a lesson from that, so it decided Friday to truncate the 2016 nominating schedule, with an eye toward holding the national convention in June or July instead of late August, as in the last cycle.
NEWS
January 16, 2014 | By Kathleen Hennessey
RALEIGH, N.C. -- Before President Obama unveiled a manufacturing initiative here Wednesday, he delivered his customary shout-out to local officials, including the Republican governor sitting in the front row, and thanked Democratic Sen. Kay Hagan "for the great work she's doing. " But Hagan wasn't there to hear his kudos, which Obama noted and which was already well-known by her Republican opponents. The senator, who is facing a tough battle for reelection, had been taking heat for days over whether she would attend, highlighting a quandary vulnerable Democrats will face until election day: how to welcome Air Force One to their state without carrying off its passenger's baggage.
OPINION
December 13, 2013
Re "Another key group eludes the GOP," Dec. 8 As the former chairman of the California Asian Pacific Islander Legislative Caucus, I was heartened by this article. Oftentimes our Asian and Pacific Islander American (APIA) communities are ignored or overlooked politically. The Times notes that we are the fastest-growing minority in the United States. Consequently, we are an important community for both Republicans and Democrats. Our attitudes toward government referenced in the article - supporting "tax hikes to reduce the federal deficit; more supportive of a large, activist government; friendlier toward immigrants in the country illegally; and more favorably disposed to Obamacare than voters overall" - are among the reasons APIA voters supported President Obama with 73% of their vote in 2012.
NEWS
October 7, 2013 | By Cathleen Decker
Six months after national Republicans issued a brutal self-assessment intended to cut their own path out of the wilderness, the limits of their progress were sharply apparent during the weekend state Republican convention. The report criticized Republicans for holding to the approaches advocated in the Ronald Reagan era without “figuring out what comes next”; the Anaheim convention featured the ritual genuflections to Reagan with rare mentions of successful politicians since.
NEWS
August 16, 2013 | By Morgan Little
WASHINGTON - The Republican National Committee voted Friday to boycott CNN and NBC if the networks produce films on Hillary Rodham Clinton, who is seen as the Democratic Party's strongest potential contender for the 2016 presidential election. Reince Priebus, the RNC chairman and a vocal opponent of the two films, said the party is “done putting up with this nonsense.” “There are plenty of other news outlets. We'll still reach voters, maybe more voters. CNN and NBC anchors will just have to watch on their competitors' networks,” he told RNC members during their summer meeting in Boston.
NATIONAL
April 12, 2013 | By Maeve Reston and Seema Mehta, Los Angeles Times
With an eye on the White House in 2016, Republicans spent this week in Hollywood mapping a path to a resurgence - determining how to streamline the primary process and close their deficit with Democrats among key voter blocs such as single women and Latinos. But members of the Republican National Committee largely tiptoed around the greater challenge facing their party: The GOP's stance on issues such as marriage, reproductive rights and President Obama's healthcare plan are diametrically at odds with some of the very voters the party is trying to win over.
NEWS
October 18, 2012 | By Joseph Tanfani
A man who was being paid to register voters by the Republican Party of Virginia was arrested Thursday after he was seen dumping eight registration forms into a dumpster. Colin Small, 31, was working as a supervisor as part of a registration operation in eight swing states financed by the Republican National Committee. Small, of Phoenixville, Pa., was first hired by Strategic Allied Consulting, a firm that was fired by the party after suspect voter forms surfaced in Florida and other states.
NEWS
March 3, 2000
Though states will continue to hold primaries into June, a Republican candidate could secure his party's nomination on March 14. * Source: Republican National Committee; researched by MASSIE RITSCH / Los Angeles Times
NATIONAL
April 11, 2013 | By Seema Mehta and Maeve Reston, Los Angeles Times
Republican leaders on Thursday focused on one of the most pressing challenges the party faces as it strives to retake the White House in 2016 - its deep and persistent unpopularity among crucial voting groups, such as Latinos and single women. Speaker after speaker told members of the Republican National Committee, meeting in Hollywood, that the party and its candidates needed to be part of those communities not just when elections near, that they needed to highlight areas of shared interest and that they must promote minority and women candidates among their ranks.
NATIONAL
April 9, 2013 | By Maeve Reston and Seema Mehta, Los Angeles Times
After the crushing presidential loss in November, national Republican leaders offered a blunt message in a postelection report: Unless the party appealed to women, minorities and voters with divergent views, there was little hope of reversing their national losing streak. The first test of the party's will to reshape its image comes Wednesday as the 168 members of the Republican National Committee - who represent some of the party's most conservative voices - meet in Hollywood for a three-day retreat to discuss their messaging problems and calendar changes that RNC Chairman Reince Priebus hopes will position them to win in 2016.
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