Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRepublican National Convention
IN THE NEWS

Republican National Convention

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 26, 2012 | By Seema Mehta
ST. PETE BEACH, Fla. - Professor Newt is heading to Tampa to school the delegates at the Republican National Convention. Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich, a onetime college professor, plans to lead daily two-hour seminars called “Newt U” every day of the convention on rotating campuses in the region, the RNC announced Sunday. It's a reprise of the role - an academic and historian - that Gingrich relished playing on the campaign trail during his unsuccessful GOP primary bid. Each two-hour seminar is linked to that day's convention theme and features speakers, including Wisc.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 3, 2014 | By Mark Z. Barabak
There was - if not exactly dancing in the streets - a small frisson of excitement surging through half a dozen of America's great cities Wednesday as word emerged that six finalists had been chosen as the possible site of the 2016 Republican National Convention. They are, in impartially alphabetic order: Cincinnati, Cleveland, Dallas, Denver, Kansas City and Las Vegas. Two cities were eliminated from consideration by the party's site selection committee: Columbus, Ohio, and Phoenix, the latter, doubtless, to the dismay of sun worshippers who savored nothing more than the prospect of baking in the Sonoran Desert's 120-degree summer heat.
Advertisement
NATIONAL
August 29, 2012
Until Ann Romney and New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie stepped into the prime-time spotlight Tuesday night, the stage at the Republican National Convention was dominated by a parade of racial and ethnic minorities. The same could not be said about the delegates in the hall. As the United States has become an increasingly more diverse country, the Republican Party has maintained a distinctly pale hue. Still, the party can boast a number of black and Latino elected officials -- and a bunch of them were put in front of the TV cameras on the opening night of the Tampa confab.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2013 | By Gary Goldstein
Is he an aggressive, paranoid, pathological liar or an American hero? That's the complex question director Jamie Meltzer explores - if never quite answers - regarding left-wing radical-turned-FBI mole Brandon Darby in the compelling, well-crafted documentary "Informant. " With seemingly full cooperation from Darby (strangely, he even "acts" in dramatic re-creations of key events), Meltzer lays out the disparate facts of Darby's recent past, starting in 2005 when the Texas native drove to New Orleans to help rescue a friend, former Black Panther Robert King Wilkerson, from the ravages of Hurricane Katrina.
NATIONAL
August 29, 2012 | By Melanie Mason
TAMPA, Fla. - A little more than a year ago, Frank VanderSloot contributed $1million to a "super PAC" supporting Mitt Romney. Now, the Idaho-based health products executive is a sought-after donor at the Republican National Convention as he makes the rounds of independent groups backing the GOP ticket. On Monday, VanderSloot and his wife met privately for an hour and a half with Karl Rove, the former top advisor to President George W. Bush and the strategist for the GOP heavyweight group American Crossroads.
NEWS
August 19, 1988 | Associated Press
Television ratings for the Republican National Convention dropped again on Wednesday night, while ABC easily outdistanced its two rivals for the largest share of the dwindling audience. The A. C. Nielsen Co. reported that ABC had an average rating of 8.7 on the night Vice President George Bush won the party's nomination for the presidency. NBC and CBS tied with ratings of 6.7. The three-network total of 16.7 was down from 19.9 on Monday and 17.6 on Tuesday.
NEWS
August 17, 1988 | GEORGE SKELTON, Times Sacramento Bureau Chief
California Gov. George Deukmejian's big moment at the 1988 Republican National Convention turned out to be not his acceptance of the vice presidential nomination--just as he had long insisted--but a five-minute prime-time speech Tuesday night about law and order. Deukmejian had the personal misfortune, however, of speaking only a few hours after Vice President George Bush had announced the selection of Indiana Sen. Dan Quayle as his running mate.
NEWS
August 18, 1988 | GEORGE SKELTON, Times Staff Writer
George Bush now needs to throw away the canned speeches he has used as vice president "and go back and speak from the heart," as he did while running against Ronald Reagan in 1980, Sen. Arlen Specter of Pennsylvania said Wednesday.
NEWS
August 17, 1988 | DAVID LAUTER, Times Staff Writer
Once upon a time, an idealistic group of Americans thought they could ban big-money givers from presidential politics. Being congressmen, they even passed a law about it. So much for laws. Earlier this summer, Democratic money chief Robert Farmer announced that he planned to raise $50 million from private donors to help elect presidential nominee Michael S. Dukakis. GOP leaders cried foul. This week, they announced their response: They will try to raise $98 million.
NEWS
August 17, 1988 | From a Times Staff Writer
The last bastion of spontaneity is falling. As political conventions over the last generation evolved from decision-making conclaves to elaborate television shows, and opportunities for delegates to act on their own one by one sloughed off, one bit of individualism stubbornly clung on like a vestigial tail: the roll call. Lines like "Guam, where America's day begins" and "Florida, the Sunshine State," became fixtures of American politics.
NATIONAL
June 19, 2013 | By Marina Villeneuve, Washington Bureau, This post has been updated, as indicated below.
WASHINGTON - Fourteen-year-old April Greene traveled from Murfreesboro, Tenn., with her family to watch Congress dedicate a statue of her ancestor - abolitionist leader Frederick Douglass, born a slave in 1818. "I'm his great-great-great-granddaughter," she said, counting the "greats" on her fingers. "It's an honor. " On Wednesday, other descendants and national and local officials gathered in the U.S. Capitol Visitor Center for the ceremony. Douglass' statue is the fourth honoring an African American in the Capitol, after statues of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., Rosa Parks and Sojourner Truth.
BUSINESS
October 25, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
If you're a Democrat, you're likely to be a fan of Google, Amazon.com and PBS, while Republicans bestow favor on Fox News Channel, Chick-fil-A and Johnson & Johnson. At least those are the findings of the consumer research firm YouGov in its annual report on the brands that people of different political persuasions like. Although Democrats and Republicans differ a great deal in their favorite brands, there is middle ground - members of both political groups enjoy Cheerios, Clorox and Craftsman.
NEWS
September 7, 2012 | By Michael A. Memoli
CHARLOTTE , N.C. - Is it the Bill Clinton bounce? President Obama appears to be getting a lift from the Democratic National Convention, with his job approval rating hitting a 16-month high, according to the latest Gallup survey. The three-day tracking poll, in the field each of the days of the Democrats' convention in Charlotte, shows 52% now approve of Obama's performance, a one-day change of three percentage points, and up nine points since the end of the Republican National Convention.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 2012 | By Meredith Blake
Given the state of contemporary political discourse, "The Daily Show" rarely has to look very hard to find someone (or something) worthy of ridicule. Occasionally, though, a moment comes along that's impervious to Jon Stewart's satirical gaze, like Bill Clinton's deeply wonky yet riveting speech at the Democratic National Convention on Wednesday night. On Thursday's "Daily Show," Stewart began with a few obligatory jokes about the length of Clinton's remarks. A Giants fan, he grumbled that "this was not the event from last night I wanted to go into overtime," but from there it was all praise for Bubba.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 2012 | By Meg James
An estimated 35.7 million people watched President Obama accept his party's nomination Thursday night in Charlotte, N.C., according to Nielsen. The audience for the prime-time coverage of the final night of the Democratic National Convention eclipsed the 30.3 million who tuned in last week to see Mitt Romney speak at the Republican National Convention in Tampa, Fla.  However, four years ago, an estimated 38.3 million viewers watched then-Sen....
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2012 | By Meg James
It was a clash of titans, and Bill Clinton won. Wednesday night's prime-time coverage of the Democratic National Convention, which featured a fiery and finger-pointing address by former President Bill Clinton, attracted 25.1 million viewers, according to ratings giant Nielsen. The Democrats out-muscled the season opener of NFL football on NBC, which drew 23.9 million viewers. The Dallas Cowboys defeated the New York Giants on the field. The second night of the Democratic convention in Charlotte, N.C., was off slightly from the opening night of the event, which faced significantly less competition on TV.  On Tuesday night, the convention showcased Michelle Obama and drew 26.2 million viewers.  The Democratic convention continues to draw a larger audience than last week's Republican National Convention in Tampa, Fla. The second night of coverage of the Republican National Convention, which featured Rep. Paul Ryan of Wisconsin, the GOP nominee for vice president, drew 21.94 million viewers.
NEWS
August 17, 1988 | From a Times Staff Writer
As Vice President George Bush bade President Reagan farewell Tuesday at Belle Chasse Naval Air Station, he introduced the children of his son and Mexico-born daughter-in-law. "That's Jebby's kids from Florida," Bush told the President. "The little brown ones." When a reporter asked what the vice president had meant by the remark, son Jeb Bush's younger brother, Marvin Bush, pointed a finger angrily and said: "My father's proud of all 10 of his grandchildren, and don't you forget that!
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1988 | MARK I. PINSKY, Times Staff Writer
Since arriving in Southern California from the Midwest in an old car more than 30 years ago, the Rev. Robert H. Schuller, the silver-haired Garden Grove minister with the mellifluous voice and the megawatt smile, has risen steadily. From an itinerant preacher--holding forth on the roof of a drive-in movie refreshment stand--Schuller grew to become the pastor of the spectacular, glass-walled Crystal Cathedral and a nationwide television pulpit, together worth an estimated $75 million.
NATIONAL
September 6, 2012 | By Hector Becerra, Los Angeles Times
CHARLOTTE, N.C. - Pausing briefly during his speech to the Republican National Convention in Tampa, Fla., Craig Romney told the delegates that it was his "privilege" to say a few words in Spanish. " Mi padre, Mitt Romney, es un hombre de familia ," he said. ("My father is a family man. ") In fluent if slightly halting Spanish, the 31-year-old said his father valued that the United States is a country of immigrants. " El ama a nuestra nacion ," he said. ("He loves our country.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2012 | By Meg James
An estimated 26.2 million people tuned in to watch the Democratic National Convention on Tuesday night, according to Nielsen -- 17.7% more than watched the Republican convention last week. First Lady Michelle Obama was the headlining speaker for the opening night of the convention in Charlotte, N.C. A week ago Tuesday, the first night of coverage of the Republican National Convention in Tampa, Fla., 22.3 million people watched Ann Romney and New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie. Last Thursday, the final night of the Tampa convention, 33 million people watched Clint Eastwood and Republican nominee Mitt Romney.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|