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NEWS
November 4, 1994 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The man who may be only days away from becoming Virginia's next senator lopes onto the train station platform, one hand protectively cradling a foam coffee cup while the other reaches out in greeting to 100 or so well-wishers waiting in the chilly morning air to meet him. "Good mornin', folks," he says, flashing the well-known gap-toothed smile that makes him look like he is still in the process of shedding his baby teeth. "I'm Oliver North and I'd sure appreciate your vote." "You got it, Ollie!"
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NEWS
March 8, 2014 | By Daniel Rothberg
OXON HILL, Md. - For an event remembered by its big statements - rabble-rousing speeches and students clad in American-flag shorts - this year's Conservative Political Action Conference was nearly silent on same-sex marriage and other such issues. But the low-key treatment spoke loudly about a growing tension between conservatives who want to raise the issue - most of them opposed to gay rights - and those who want to focus on other issues. In a bit of irony, a subject once effectively used by some Republicans against Democrats has now become something of a wedge issue within the Republican Party.
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OPINION
February 20, 2009
California's economic problems are deeper today than they would have been had a balanced budget been adopted last year. But perhaps today should be reserved for expressions of relief. Although California's Republican lawmakers appeared bent on self-destruction -- and actually removed state Sen. Dave Cogdill of Modesto as caucus chair to punish him for brokering a deal to save the state -- Sen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 2014 | By Seema Mehta
Ron Nehring, former chairman of the California Republican Party, said Tuesday that he is running for lieutenant governor. "It's a key leadership position in state government, and the lieutenant governor's office is what the holder chooses to make of it," Nehring said in an interview. Current Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom, a Democrat, "treats it like a taxpayer-funded gubernatorial exploratory committee for 2018," Nehring said. "The office should be used as a platform to develop the type of bold reform plans that the state needs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1997 | DEBRA CANO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The chairmen of the state Democratic and Republican parties made a friendly joint appearance at the Richard Nixon Library's '98 California Issues Forum but clearly differed on a variety of issues. Democratic Party Chairman Art Torres declared that the Democratic Party was better able to deal with the issues that most concern Californians these days--the economy, crime and education. "More people have more confidence in us to handle those programs than the Republicans," Torres said.
NEWS
October 12, 1990
Strange bread-fellows: At his $500-a-plate Century Plaza fund-raiser last week, Democratic state attorney general candidate Arlo Smith broke bread with some interesting dining mates. Smith, who supported the sweeping Proposition 115 anti-crime initiative approved by voters in June, was introduced by Robert D. Raven. Raven, a former president of the American Bar Assn., is the Raven of Raven vs. Deukmejian, a lawsuit challenging the constitutionality of Proposition 115.
NEWS
November 10, 1994 | From the Times Washington Bureau
WHO KNEW?--The magnitude of the Republican sweep Tuesday took a lot of people by surprise. Were pre-election polls wrong? Actually, no. But media reporting about the results did pull punches. Most polls found that Republicans were poised to take a majority of the congressional vote for the first time since the Dwight D. Eisenhower Administration--and stories on those polls generally noted that such a finding could well point to a GOP majority in Congress.
OPINION
February 27, 2013
Re “ Neither side blinks in budget standoff ,” Feb. 24, and “ White House turns up the volume ,” Feb. 26 From day one of President Obama's first term, the Republicans put into effect a political strategy of cheerleading for the failure of his governing, regardless of the harm their self-serving politics caused the country and the silent majority of its citizens. The evidence of this is overwhelming. It started with the “just say no” obstructionism in the Senate, and it evolved into a mantra of “no compromise” preached by extremist House Republicans who endorsed the blackmailing of the White House into the budget cuts compromise.
NEWS
September 3, 2012 | By Hector Becerra
CHARLOTTE, N.C. - They may be the fastest-growing and best-educated racial group, boasting the highest average income in the country, but when it comes to politics, Asian Americans have historically spent little time in the political spotlight of either the Democrats or Republicans . But on Monday, a group of leaders at the Asian American and Pacific Islander caucus meeting at the Democratic National Convention said they see signs of...
NEWS
November 29, 1995 | PETER M. WARREN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Former Assembly Speaker Doris Allen, targeted by her GOP colleagues for thwarting their drive to control the Legislature's lower house, was overwhelmingly recalled Tuesday by voters who replaced her with an ardent conservative backed by the Orange County Republican Party. Allen (R-Cypress), who in June became the Assembly's first woman Speaker but held the post only slightly more than three months, lost by nearly a 2-1 ratio. Turnout was about 25%.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 2013 | By David Colker
When attorney and Republican Party activist John J. Lynch ran for Los Angeles County tax assessor in 1986, he was shocked at the result - he won. "It was a surprise," said Lynch, and he wasn't the only one taken aback. Lynch, who had never run for elective office, was up against 11 other candidates, including two former state Assembly members - Gordon Hahn and Jim Keysor. Lynch spent only a few thousand dollars on the campaign, whereas Hahn spent $100,000 and Keysor $185,000. "I can't figure where John Lynch came from," Keysor said.
NATIONAL
September 22, 2013 | By Lisa Mascaro
WASHINGTON - With one week left before a possible government shutdown, congressional debate has exposed deep divisions within the Republican Party, pitting tea-party-backed conservatives against their colleagues. Budget moves orchestrated by tea party leader Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas have encountered outright hostility from fellow Republican senators who say his strategy does not appear to have an endgame. "I didn't go to Harvard or Princeton, but I can count," Sen. Bob Corker (R-Tenn.)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 2013 | By Irene Lacher
Meghan McCain, the outspoken daughter of Sen. John McCain, stars in "Raising McCain," billed as a new "docu-talk" series on Participant Media's new TV network, Pivot. Cameras follow the 28-year-old pundit on interviews exploring a variety of issues of concern to the so-called millennial generation. How did your show come about? I met with my production company, Go Go Luckey, and we had this idea to do a talk show - style show, but more filmed like a documentary or a reality show, just because I personally don't watch daytime talk-show television, and I don't think the average teenager or twentysomething does either.
NATIONAL
July 27, 2013 | By Richard Simon
WASHINGTON - Reps. Jeff Denham and Dana Rohrabacher are California GOP colleagues usually on the same side of issues - except immigration. Denham, who represents District 10 in the Central Valley, supports legislation that would grant millions of immigrants legal status and says an overhaul of immigration laws is important to the state's economy and the Republican Party's future. The issue is personal, too. He is married to the daughter of a legal Mexican immigrant. His sister married an immigrant who entered the country illegally but now has legal status.
NATIONAL
June 8, 2013 | By Maeve Reston, Los Angeles Times
PARK CITY, Utah - After women, young voters and Latinos fled from the Republican Party in droves in 2012, some GOP leaders thought they had a chance to turn things around. They embarked on a "listening tour" and put out a report acknowledging that many voters viewed the party as intransigent and suffused with old white men. But change has come slowly. While some Republican senators are working in Washington on a bipartisan immigration package that they hope will improve the party's image, the debate over social issues and gay marriage continues to dominate, and relations between conservative tea party factions and more moderate party elements seem as fractious as ever.
OPINION
June 2, 2013 | Doyle McManus
The "tea party" is back and is brewing trouble for the Republican establishment. After the GOP debacle in the 2012 election, when Republicans not only failed to win the presidency but blew a chance to take over the Senate, party leaders paused to consider what had gone wrong. The Republican National Committee issued a scathing report warning that the party was in "an ideological cul-de-sac" and resolved to act friendlier toward women, minorities and low-income voters. Strategist Karl Rove said the lesson was to nominate more moderate candidates and set about raising money to do just that.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2003 | Kevin Crust, Times Staff Writer
In the political documentary "The Party's Over," actor Philip Seymour Hoffman serves as a guide crisscrossing the country, scrutinizing the political process during the presidential election of 2000. Directed by Donovan Leitch and Rebecca Chaiklin, it's something of a sequel to 1993's "The Last Party," a similar endeavor that chronicled the events leading to the election of Bill Clinton.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 1999 | ROSS K. BAKER, Ross K. Baker is a professor of political science at Rutgers University
It is probably inevitable in a time in which the two major American parties offer serious, earnest, experienced hopefuls, that a kind of antic spirit infects the political world and makes people susceptible to the lure of improbable movements and impossible candidates. That is the current noisy spectacle surrounding Pat Buchanan's threatened defection from the Republican Party and possible embrace of a party whose members are split over whether they want him as their standard bearer.
OPINION
April 17, 2013
Re "GOP aims to alter tone, not positions," April 13 I consider myself a moderate Republican, but after holding my nose and voting twice for George W. Bush and then for John McCain, I voted last November for Barack Obama. As summarized by the Bobby Jindal soundbite, I was tired of casting my lot with "the stupid party. " My vote for McCain, which could have made Sarah Palin vice president, was especially regrettable. The oft-repeated mantra by Republicans after their defeat last November is that there's a perception that the party is out of touch.
NATIONAL
April 9, 2013 | By David Horsey, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
Reince Priebus, chairman of the Republican National Committee, says his party needs to be retooled. Republicans, he says, need to reach out to minorities, show a willingness to work with those who do not agree with them 100% and find a way to convince young people that the GOP does not stand for Goofy Old Paranoids.  He is not the only Republican leader to worry about the future of the party. If a course correction is not made, they fear, there are many more lost elections to come.
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