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NATIONAL
March 5, 2014 | Molly Hennessy-Fiske
Republican incumbents threatened by tea party challengers emerged triumphant in Tuesday's Texas primary, with longtime U.S. Sen. John Cornyn and U.S. Rep. Pete Sessions coasting to victory. The primary also marked the electoral debut of the fourth generation of the Bush dynasty with George P. Bush's candidacy. The son of former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, nephew and grandson of the former presidents and great-grandson of a U.S. senator, the 37-year-old won the Republican nomination for Texas land commissioner, a little-known but powerful post that has served as a launching pad for state politics.
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OPINION
April 25, 2014 | By Paul Thornton
How Lincolnesque is the Party of Lincoln? Depends on who you ask. According to reader Joan Smith of Northridge, the Republican Party that freed the slaves in the 19th century and stood in opposition to civil rights-averse Southern Democrats in the 1960s doesn't deserve a bad rap. In a letter to the editor published Sunday, Smith wrote: “The Republican Party since the time of Abraham Lincoln has championed civil rights, while the Democratic Party...
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NEWS
June 13, 1995 | MELISSA HEALY and PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Republican critics of affirmative action hailed Monday's Supreme Court decision as a mandate for even more sweeping action by Congress and vowed to press home their attack on federal programs of racial preference.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2014 | George Skelton, Capitol Journal
SACRAMENTO - It has come to this: California politics have become so one-sided that the only half-way intriguing statewide races this spring are for two largely ministerial jobs. One is secretary of state. The other is state controller. Both are pretty mundane. The secretary of state oversees elections and maintains public databases on campaign contributions and lobbyists' spending. The office also processes a lot of business-related stuff. Sounds simple. But under termed-out Democrat Debra Bowen, few things seemingly have been simple.
MAGAZINE
September 4, 1994 | Joe Morgenstern, Joe Morgenstern is a journalist and screenwriter who lives in Santa Monica. His last piece for this magazine was a profile of Matt Groening, cartoonist and creator of "The Simpsons."
One Saturday last spring, the same day that marked the kickoff of West Hollywood's annual Gay and Lesbian Pride Celebration, a small group of conservative Republican activists got together for an alfresco fund-raising brunch in a Hollywood Hills home. The setting seemed like heaven--ripe oranges and lemons on curving branches, mockingbirds burbling arias beneath an azure sky--and the dozen or so guests seemed perfectly cast for their roles as Grand Old Party stalwarts.
NEWS
September 25, 1999 | MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Campaign season has just begun in the most electorally lopsided county in the state, where "two-party politics" means Democrat and, well, Democrat, and the Republican Central Committee recently met to make its big quadrennial decision: which Democrat to endorse for mayor. Hard on the heels of the Pledge of Allegiance, addressed to the kind of miniature flag that sticks out of graves on Memorial Day, the committee launched into fight No.
OPINION
September 1, 2012
Re "Romney says he'll do what Obama couldn't," Aug. 31 Unheard of in modern political history and downright Orwellian is how the Republicans at their convention ignored their own most recent two-term president, George W. Bush. In their collective group-think mode, do they believe that this will erase his eight-year tenure from our memories and rewrite the history of their time in office? No. I remember Bush and his terms in office. I also remember how America used to honor the position, if not the person.
NATIONAL
March 7, 2013 | By Paul West and Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON -- A sudden debate over the potential use of unmanned drones against terrorist suspects in the United States touched off a power struggle within the Republican Party on Thursday, even as the Senate confirmed President Obama's CIA nominee after a highly publicized delay. The fast-moving developments represented a victory for Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky, a first-term senator from the GOP's tea party wing, who had delayed John Brennan's nomination as CIA director Wednesday with an old-style filibuster that lasted into the wee hours.
NATIONAL
April 9, 2013 | By David Horsey, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
Reince Priebus, chairman of the Republican National Committee, says his party needs to be retooled. Republicans, he says, need to reach out to minorities, show a willingness to work with those who do not agree with them 100% and find a way to convince young people that the GOP does not stand for Goofy Old Paranoids.  He is not the only Republican leader to worry about the future of the party. If a course correction is not made, they fear, there are many more lost elections to come.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 1998
Mark Barabak (The Washington Connection, Nov. 24) indicated that to win, the GOP needs to be more "moderate." Wrong. To win, the GOP and Democrats, also, need to be liberal on civil liberties and conservative on economics. Polls show this. Jesse Ventura's Minnesota win illustrates this. This position is known as libertarian. DEVON SHOWLEY Cypress
OPINION
April 20, 2014
Re "Hate without end," Opinion, April 17 The groups named by Peter Gottschalk as being responsible for widespread hate in this century are "right-wing politicians, conservative donors and professional Islamophobes. " He does not have to come right out and say "Republicans" because people have been primed by the media to associate these words with the GOP. Gottschalk gives a history of the Ku Klux Klan. He omits the fact that the Republican Party since the time of Abraham Lincoln has championed civil rights, while the Democratic Party prior to the 1960s - when it was forced to accept civil rights - has a dismal history in comparison.
OPINION
April 15, 2014 | Doyle McManus
Is Jeb Bush's moment over? Not in his mind. The former governor of Florida says he's considering a campaign to become his family's third president, even though he dreads "getting back into the vortex of the mud fight. " But as enticing as it is for the Republican establishment to contemplate the prospect of an unexpected comeback, an epic series of primary battles and a cinematic rematch between the Clinton and Bush dynasties, it's not all that likely. The Republican Party has changed dramatically since 2002, the last year Jeb Bush ran for office, and not in ways that would aid his candidacy.
NATIONAL
March 29, 2014 | By Maeve Reston
LAS VEGAS - Long before voters begin paying attention to the 2016 presidential contest, the quiet race for the Republican Party's most elite donors was well under way in recent days as potential candidates made a pilgrimage west to court prolific spender Sheldon Adelson and other members of the Republican Jewish Coalition. During speeches Saturday, Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker, Ohio Gov. John Kasich and New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie all addressed the key concerns of Adelson and many group members - the threat of a nuclear Iran, their desire to strengthen U.S. ties with Israel, and what they view as the waning prestige of the U.S. abroad.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2014 | Jean Merl
At a recent reception in their honor, four of California's Democratic freshman House members posed for photos and beamed at well-wishers. But signs of the battles they face were hard to miss. Asked by a fellow politician how his reelection campaign was going, Rep. Scott Peters of San Diego replied, "Hanging in. Got a tough race. " The same answer could have come from any of the honorees. Although the rest of their first-term colleagues occupy seats in strongly Democratic districts, for these four, California's deep blue hue looks more like pale violet.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 2014 | Michael Finnegan and Seema Mehta
The two leading candidates to challenge Gov. Jerry Brown's reelection bid put their clashing brands of conservatism on display Saturday at a state Republican convention where party loyalists conceded their election prospects were bleak this year in California. At a painfully low point for the state party, Republican gubernatorial rivals Neel Kashkari and Tim Donnelly each tried to convince hundreds of wary activists that he could oust the popular Democratic incumbent. Kashkari, a former Goldman Sachs investment banker preferred by the party establishment, stressed jobs, education and his heritage as the son of Indian immigrants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 2014 | By Michael Finnegan and Seema Mehta
BURLINGAME, Calif. -- The audience reaction told the story: For Neel Kashkari, polite applause; for his GOP gubernatorial rival, Tim Donnelly, a prolonged roar of cheers. With that, hundreds of Republicans wrapped up the state GOP convention near the San Francisco Airport on Sunday with a resounding - and unofficial - endorsement of Donnelly's candidacy for governor on a tea party platform that has left some moderates squirming. Kashkari, a Laguna Beach newcomer to California politics, has been collecting big-dollar donations from fellow investment bankers and other wealthy GOP donors to run a TV and mail campaign that he hopes will overcome Donnelly's apparent grassroots support.
NATIONAL
February 21, 2010 | By Christi Parsons
Talk show host Glenn Beck poked and prodded the Republican hierarchy Saturday night in a raucous address to fellow conservatives, comparing the party to an alcoholic who hasn't hit bottom and to golfer Tiger Woods before his public repentance. Calling himself a recovering alcoholic in that context, Beck said he believes in the concept of redemption but that he doesn't think the GOP has taken the first step toward achieving it. "I have not yet heard people in the Republican Party admit they have a problem," Beck told a packed ballroom in Washington.
NEWS
March 11, 2014 | By Daniel Rothberg
WASHINGTON -- The chairman of the Republican Party's congressional campaign wing said Tuesday that a hotly contested special election in Florida is serving as a laboratory for testing messages and tactics for the 2014 midterm races. During a news conference, Rep. Greg Walden (R-Ore.) said the National Republican Congressional Committee is working to improve the breadth and depth of its voter database, and that the committee will keep tabs on how its digital strategy plays out in Florida.
NEWS
March 8, 2014 | By Daniel Rothberg
OXON HILL, Md. - For an event remembered by its big statements - rabble-rousing speeches and students clad in American-flag shorts - this year's Conservative Political Action Conference was nearly silent on same-sex marriage and other such issues. But the low-key treatment spoke loudly about a growing tension between conservatives who want to raise the issue - most of them opposed to gay rights - and those who want to focus on other issues. In a bit of irony, a subject once effectively used by some Republicans against Democrats has now become something of a wedge issue within the Republican Party.
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