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NATIONAL
March 5, 2012 | By David Horsey
George Will, one of the last lions of the right wing whose conservatism is a philosophy rather than a pathology, has heaped scorn on Republican leaders for their cowardly obeisance to Rush Limbaugh. Sunday morning on ABC's "This Week," Will said straight out that "Republican leaders are afraid of Rush Limbaugh. " Last week, Limbaugh infamously characterized Sandra Fluke, a 30-year-old Georgetown University law student, as a "slut" and a "prostitute" who should provide the world with videos of herself having sex because she supports birth control coverage in employee insurance plans.
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NATIONAL
March 29, 2014 | By Maeve Reston
LAS VEGAS - Long before voters begin paying attention to the 2016 presidential contest, the quiet race for the Republican Party's most elite donors was well under way in recent days as potential candidates made a pilgrimage west to court prolific spender Sheldon Adelson and other members of the Republican Jewish Coalition. During speeches Saturday, Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker, Ohio Gov. John Kasich and New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie all addressed the key concerns of Adelson and many group members - the threat of a nuclear Iran, their desire to strengthen U.S. ties with Israel, and what they view as the waning prestige of the U.S. abroad.
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NATIONAL
September 26, 2012 | By David Horsey
AMSTERDAM -- On an early morning flight coming out of the clouds above the North Sea, the first objects that come into view as the coast of the Netherlands approaches are the windmills. No, not the quaint, creaking, wooden windmills that, along with wooden shoes and the little boy with his finger in the dike, are the cliches of Dutch culture; these windmills are sleek and modern and so huge they dwarf the container ships passing by.  There are phalanxes of them just off the Dutch coast, and on land there are many, many more planted like daffodils along the wet rural stretches of this low-lying country that looks as if it could, at any moment, be inundated by the sea. In fact, the Dutch could be swamped as sea levels rise due to global climate change.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2014 | Jean Merl
At a recent reception in their honor, four of California's Democratic freshman House members posed for photos and beamed at well-wishers. But signs of the battles they face were hard to miss. Asked by a fellow politician how his reelection campaign was going, Rep. Scott Peters of San Diego replied, "Hanging in. Got a tough race. " The same answer could have come from any of the honorees. Although the rest of their first-term colleagues occupy seats in strongly Democratic districts, for these four, California's deep blue hue looks more like pale violet.
NATIONAL
February 1, 2013 | By David Horsey
A glimpse of political oblivion has suddenly inspired at least some Republicans to push for comprehensive immigration reform. But this does not guarantee that, six months from now, an immigration bill will be sent to the president or that, even if it is, Republicans will be saved from approaching demographic doom.  Latinos gave President Obama 71% of their votes in the 2012 election and helped add the electoral votes of Colorado, Florida and...
NATIONAL
August 22, 2012 | By David Horsey
Missouri congressman Todd Akin's outrageously weird assertion that a woman cannot get pregnant from “forcible rape" exposes three predicaments facing the Republican Party. First, Akin has made himself so toxic that he may lose his race against Missouri's Democratic Sen. Claire McCaskill and thereby kill any chance Republicans have of taking control of the U.S. Senate . Second, Akin's sudden notoriety is bringing to public attention the fact that his absolutist stance on abortion is fully shared by a guy named Paul Ryan, the chap who will be nominated for the vice presidency at the Republican convention next week.
NATIONAL
March 5, 2014 | Molly Hennessy-Fiske
Republican incumbents threatened by tea party challengers emerged triumphant in Tuesday's Texas primary, with longtime U.S. Sen. John Cornyn and U.S. Rep. Pete Sessions coasting to victory. The primary also marked the electoral debut of the fourth generation of the Bush dynasty with George P. Bush's candidacy. The son of former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, nephew and grandson of the former presidents and great-grandson of a U.S. senator, the 37-year-old won the Republican nomination for Texas land commissioner, a little-known but powerful post that has served as a launching pad for state politics.
NEWS
June 13, 1995 | MELISSA HEALY and PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Republican critics of affirmative action hailed Monday's Supreme Court decision as a mandate for even more sweeping action by Congress and vowed to press home their attack on federal programs of racial preference.
MAGAZINE
September 4, 1994 | Joe Morgenstern, Joe Morgenstern is a journalist and screenwriter who lives in Santa Monica. His last piece for this magazine was a profile of Matt Groening, cartoonist and creator of "The Simpsons."
One Saturday last spring, the same day that marked the kickoff of West Hollywood's annual Gay and Lesbian Pride Celebration, a small group of conservative Republican activists got together for an alfresco fund-raising brunch in a Hollywood Hills home. The setting seemed like heaven--ripe oranges and lemons on curving branches, mockingbirds burbling arias beneath an azure sky--and the dozen or so guests seemed perfectly cast for their roles as Grand Old Party stalwarts.
NEWS
September 25, 1999 | MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Campaign season has just begun in the most electorally lopsided county in the state, where "two-party politics" means Democrat and, well, Democrat, and the Republican Central Committee recently met to make its big quadrennial decision: which Democrat to endorse for mayor. Hard on the heels of the Pledge of Allegiance, addressed to the kind of miniature flag that sticks out of graves on Memorial Day, the committee launched into fight No.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 2014 | Michael Finnegan and Seema Mehta
The two leading candidates to challenge Gov. Jerry Brown's reelection bid put their clashing brands of conservatism on display Saturday at a state Republican convention where party loyalists conceded their election prospects were bleak this year in California. At a painfully low point for the state party, Republican gubernatorial rivals Neel Kashkari and Tim Donnelly each tried to convince hundreds of wary activists that he could oust the popular Democratic incumbent. Kashkari, a former Goldman Sachs investment banker preferred by the party establishment, stressed jobs, education and his heritage as the son of Indian immigrants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 2014 | By Michael Finnegan and Seema Mehta
BURLINGAME, Calif. -- The audience reaction told the story: For Neel Kashkari, polite applause; for his GOP gubernatorial rival, Tim Donnelly, a prolonged roar of cheers. With that, hundreds of Republicans wrapped up the state GOP convention near the San Francisco Airport on Sunday with a resounding - and unofficial - endorsement of Donnelly's candidacy for governor on a tea party platform that has left some moderates squirming. Kashkari, a Laguna Beach newcomer to California politics, has been collecting big-dollar donations from fellow investment bankers and other wealthy GOP donors to run a TV and mail campaign that he hopes will overcome Donnelly's apparent grassroots support.
NEWS
March 11, 2014 | By Daniel Rothberg
WASHINGTON -- The chairman of the Republican Party's congressional campaign wing said Tuesday that a hotly contested special election in Florida is serving as a laboratory for testing messages and tactics for the 2014 midterm races. During a news conference, Rep. Greg Walden (R-Ore.) said the National Republican Congressional Committee is working to improve the breadth and depth of its voter database, and that the committee will keep tabs on how its digital strategy plays out in Florida.
NEWS
March 8, 2014 | By Daniel Rothberg
OXON HILL, Md. - For an event remembered by its big statements - rabble-rousing speeches and students clad in American-flag shorts - this year's Conservative Political Action Conference was nearly silent on same-sex marriage and other such issues. But the low-key treatment spoke loudly about a growing tension between conservatives who want to raise the issue - most of them opposed to gay rights - and those who want to focus on other issues. In a bit of irony, a subject once effectively used by some Republicans against Democrats has now become something of a wedge issue within the Republican Party.
NATIONAL
March 7, 2014 | By Mark Z. Barabak
DES MOINES - For more than 40 years, Iowa voters have played a vital role in picking the nation's president, culling the field of hopefuls and helping launch a fortunate handful all the way to the White House. For about 35 of those years, Iowa has been the target of jealousy and scorn, mainly from outsiders who say the state, the first to vote in the presidential contest, is too white and too rural; that its caucuses, precinct-level meetings of party faithful, are too quirky and too exclusionary to play such a key role in the nominating process.
NATIONAL
March 5, 2014 | Molly Hennessy-Fiske
Republican incumbents threatened by tea party challengers emerged triumphant in Tuesday's Texas primary, with longtime U.S. Sen. John Cornyn and U.S. Rep. Pete Sessions coasting to victory. The primary also marked the electoral debut of the fourth generation of the Bush dynasty with George P. Bush's candidacy. The son of former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, nephew and grandson of the former presidents and great-grandson of a U.S. senator, the 37-year-old won the Republican nomination for Texas land commissioner, a little-known but powerful post that has served as a launching pad for state politics.
OPINION
September 1, 2012
Re "Romney says he'll do what Obama couldn't," Aug. 31 Unheard of in modern political history and downright Orwellian is how the Republicans at their convention ignored their own most recent two-term president, George W. Bush. In their collective group-think mode, do they believe that this will erase his eight-year tenure from our memories and rewrite the history of their time in office? No. I remember Bush and his terms in office. I also remember how America used to honor the position, if not the person.
NEWS
March 4, 2014 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
HOUSTON - Republican Sen. John Cornyn of Texas fended off a tea party challenge in Tuesday's primary, easily outdistancing U.S. Rep. Steve Stockman and other GOP candidates to capture his party's nomination. The Associated Press declared Cornyn the winner as early votes showed the incumbent winning more than 6 in 10 votes. Stockman, a Houston-area congressman, drew national attention for walking out on President Obama's last State of the Union address and calling for his impeachment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 2014 | By Seema Mehta
Gubernatorial candidate Tim Donnelly received the imprimatur Sunday of a conservative group once deemed the "conscience" of the state GOP by Ronald Reagan. "I want my state back. I want my freedom back," Donnelly told hundreds of delegates and supporters at a California Republican Assembly convention in Buena Park. "You are going to be the key, because … you are the foot soldiers of freedom. " Shortly afterward, the group unanimously endorsed him. The nod, not unexpected, could be a boost for Donnelly, a second-term assemblyman from San Bernardino County and a Tea Party favorite.
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