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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 2010 | By Seema Mehta and Maeve Reston, Los Angeles Times
Sarah Palin, who has been an animating force in Republican races across the country, took to a stage in Orange County on Saturday to rally voters for the sprint to election day, separated by hundreds of miles from the top two members of California's GOP ticket. Gubernatorial nominee Meg Whitman and Senate hopeful Carly Fiorina campaigned at opposite ends of the state while Palin, immensely popular in some political quarters and reviled in others, rallied supporters at a raucous gathering in Anaheim.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 2010 | By Seema Mehta and Maeve Reston, Los Angeles Times
Sarah Palin, who has been an animating force in Republican races across the country, took to a stage in Orange County on Saturday to rally voters for the sprint to election day, separated by hundreds of miles from the top two members of California's GOP ticket. Gubernatorial nominee Meg Whitman and Senate hopeful Carly Fiorina campaigned at opposite ends of the state while Palin, immensely popular in some political quarters and reviled in others, rallied supporters at a raucous gathering in Anaheim.
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NEWS
December 6, 2001 | From a Times Staff Writer
Pat Robertson, the evangelical minister who catapulted his family values and television audience into a muscular political movement, announced Wednesday that he is retiring as president of the Christian Coalition. His departure is likely to further dim from the spotlight an organization that, in its heyday of the 1990s, delivered a newly empowered group of conservative Christian voters to the Republican base.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 2003 | Mark Z. Barabak, Times Staff Writer
At a time when California is deeply split, Arnold Schwarzenegger is a man trying to occupy the middle -- philosophically and symbolically. The center is where elections are won and lost in California, according to the accepted political wisdom. But in this unusual recall race, fired by the passion of angry Republicans and the bitterness of aggrieved Democrats, the middle ground may be the most precarious.
WORLD
November 19, 2005 | Peter Wallsten and Mark Magnier, Times Staff Writers
Thirty years ago, George W. Bush was a business student on vacation in Beijing. His father was the U.S. envoy there, forging ties to a nation still isolated from the West, and the younger Bush decided to see the city from behind the handlebars of a bicycle. "I can remember how odd people thought I looked," he told Asian journalists last week. "There wasn't much exposure to the West, and all of a sudden, an American starts riding a bike amongst them and it, frankly, surprised some people."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 2006 | Lee Drutman, Special to The Times
IN 2004, Republicans won a clean sweep of the national elections -- 232 House seats, 55 Senate seats, 28 governorships and, of course, the presidency, expanding on gains from 2000 and 2002. It's the kind of electoral dominance that could lead a pair of White House reporters to wonder: "[I]s the United States becoming a one-party country?"
OPINION
January 15, 2012 | Doyle McManus
Mitt Romney isn't a naturally eloquent man. His stump speeches are nearly content-free. They combine exaggerated denunciations of President Obama ("a pessimistic president," "the great complainer") and ardent professions of patriotism. "I love our country," Romney announces at every stop. "I love our national anthem.... I love it dearly. I love putting my hand over my heart. " He often closes speeches by reciting lines from "America the Beautiful. " When he claimed victory in Iowa on Jan. 3, his syntax crumbled into Sarah Palin-like fragments.
NATIONAL
July 13, 2012 | By Maeve Reston, Los Angeles Times
WILSON, Wyo. - On the campaign trail over the last year, there are two names that Mitt Romney almost never mentions: George W. Bush and Dick Cheney. That approach got tricky on Thursday as Romney brought his campaign to Cheney's home near Jackson Hole, where the former Massachusetts governor mingled with deep-pocketed donors at a country club with views of the towering Grand Tetons in the distance. The private reception for more than 200 donors was followed by a smaller, more intimate dinner at Cheney's house.
NEWS
December 30, 1998 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Maverick Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.), who endured 5 1/2 years of torture as a prisoner of war in Vietnam and hobbled home a hero, today will disclose his intention to seek the Republican nomination for president in 2000, aides said Tuesday. In keeping with his image as a politician who often defies convention, the former Navy bomber pilot will not deliver the obligatory grand political announcement.
NATIONAL
May 17, 2007 | Peter Wallsten, Times Staff Writer
A major divide has emerged among the leading Republican candidates for president over a central question of the 2008 campaign: Whether to follow the Bush administration's lead in pushing for aggressive treatment of detainees in fighting terrorism. Tuesday's GOP debate in South Carolina showcased those differences. Sen. John McCain of Arizona called for limits on interrogation techniques, whereas former New York Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani and onetime Massachusetts Gov.
NATIONAL
July 4, 2004 | Larry B. Stammer, Times Staff Writer
Declaring that caring for the environment is part of following Jesus, a group of 30 evangelical leaders has agreed to work for faith-based environmental activism among the nation's most conservative Christians. The decision to move ahead, made at the end of a two-day conference in Maryland, could begin to reshape environmental politics in the years ahead, those present said.
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