Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRepublican Party Iowa
IN THE NEWS

Republican Party Iowa

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 19, 1995 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Leaders of the Iowa Republican Party are touting the presidential straw poll they host in the state today as the first real test of the 1996 presidential campaign. But, judging from the advance maneuvering, what is mainly being tested is sheer, unadulterated chutzpah.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 19, 1999 | GEORGE SKELTON
Collapsing into a soft recliner after having just towed a heavy boat down a rutted, crowded interstate, I clicked on the PBS "NewsHour." I am a political junkie, after all. And I was immediately reminded why there are so very few of us. There on my living room TV was Elizabeth Dole patting a pig. Why wasn't this former transportation secretary talking about fixing our federal highway system? Pat Buchanan then was shown petting a dog. And George W. Bush was flipping flapjacks.
Advertisement
NEWS
February 9, 1988 | DOUGLAS JEHL, Times Staff Writer
An ebullient Pat Robertson, whose strong second-place showing in the Iowa caucuses confounded conventional wisdom, proclaimed himself "the conservative candidate" Monday night and said his performance would "mobilize and crystallize" support in New Hampshire and around the country. "My campaign for the presidency has been given an enormous boost here in Iowa tonight . . . " Robertson said.
NEWS
August 15, 1999 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN and MARK Z. BARABAK, TIMES POLITICAL WRITERS
Texas Gov. George W. Bush won a fiercely contested Republican straw poll here Saturday night, a result that did more to reaffirm than reshape the GOP presidential race. No delegates were at stake in the mock election. But the symbolic contest became a closely watched test of early strength for the frenzied GOP field, drawing 23,685 voters who lined up seven deep to cast ballots in the Iowa State University basketball arena.
NEWS
February 9, 1988 | CATHLEEN DECKER, Times Staff Writer
A chastened Vice President George Bush said he was "disappointed but not down" after an embarrassing third-place finish in the Iowa caucuses, and he acknowledged that voters there had sent him a message. "Work harder in New Hampshire," he said with a wincing grin. While clearly anticipating a loss to Kansas Sen.
NEWS
February 9, 1988 | GEORGE SKELTON, Times Staff Writer
Kansas Sen. Bob Dole and former television evangelist Pat Robertson both capitalized on the disenchantment of Iowa Republicans with the nation's direction to deliver a stunning blow to Vice President George Bush in Monday night's caucuses, the Los Angeles Times Poll found. In addition, Dole and the Democratic winner--Missouri Rep. Richard A. Gephardt--both benefited from their emphasis on agriculture issues.
NEWS
January 18, 1988 | From a Times Staff Writer
Sen. Bob Dole of Kansas holds a commanding 15-point lead over Vice President George Bush in an independent newspaper poll of Iowans who say they intend to vote in the state's Feb. 8 Republican presidential preference caucuses. The Des Moines Register reported Sunday that a survey of 409 likely GOP voters in the last week found Dole the choice of 41% and Bush 26%. Former religion broadcaster Pat Robertson was favored by 11%, New York Rep. Jack Kemp 8%, former Delaware Gov. Pierre S.
NEWS
January 31, 1988 | From a Times Staff Writer
Kansas Sen. Bob Dole, who enjoys a 10- to 15-point lead over Vice President George Bush in most Iowa Republican presidential preference polls, said Saturday that the race here had tightened into a "dead heat." Campaigning at a veterans' convention, Dole even talked of having to "catch up" to Bush before the key Feb. 8 caucuses. Meanwhile, former Labor Secretary William E.
NEWS
January 15, 1988 | JOHN BALZAR, Times Political Writer
When an opponent does it, call it special-interest politics. When you find yourself doing it, style it coalition building. Usually, this is the word game that surrounds Democratic candidates for office. But here in Iowa, Jack Kemp, the New York congressman, has mapped out an elaborate plan in the Republican presidential campaign to reach--and convert--an array of select, chiefly conservative groups that have short fuses on hot issues.
NEWS
February 8, 1988 | ROBERT SHOGAN, Times Political Writer
As the Republican presidential campaign grinds to a climax here in Iowa, rival strategists are waging a two-front war. On one front they are rallying support for the first big candidate showdown of 1988 in today's precinct caucuses. On the other they are striving to shape the expectations, large and small, that will bear heavily on the future course of the campaign.
NEWS
October 8, 1996 | From Associated Press
Leaders of Iowa's 4-H clubs say a plank in the state Republican platform accusing the youth agricultural groups of veering toward socialism and promoting homosexuality is--well, a lot of bull. The plank, which was proposed by a former 4-H leader, is "doing the 4-H program a great deal of disservice," Joe Kurth, the state 4-H director, said Monday.
NEWS
January 21, 1996 | MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This gritty little city on the banks of the Mississippi--where modern riverboat gambling took its first breath and Cary Grant died--has a new claim to fame: After months of controversy and a contentious vote, this past Wednesday it became the only city in the nation to restrict abortion within its narrow boundaries. In the conservative Hawkeye State, access to abortion has dropped as the strength of religious conservatives has risen.
NEWS
January 13, 1996 | STEPHEN BRAUN and NANCY HOLTZMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The morning scream-fest over how to avoid being a "prisoner of love" was reaching a crescendo on the "Tempestt" syndicated talk show when a familiar, soothing face appeared in a commercial on WHO-TV here. It was Pastor John Palmer of the First Assembly of God Church with a 30-second appeal to those "stressed out over life" to join him in prayer with Iowa's largest congregation.
NEWS
August 19, 1995 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Leaders of the Iowa Republican Party are touting the presidential straw poll they host in the state today as the first real test of the 1996 presidential campaign. But, judging from the advance maneuvering, what is mainly being tested is sheer, unadulterated chutzpah.
NEWS
June 26, 1994 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
The Iowa Republican Party's 1996 presidential straw poll was something like a risque bachelor's party: Everybody acted a little embarrassed to be there but deep down they were having a great time. No one would admit to taking seriously a sounding of presidential preference 20 months before the 1996 nomination process begins with Iowa's precinct caucuses.
NEWS
February 9, 1988 | DOUGLAS JEHL, Times Staff Writer
An ebullient Pat Robertson, whose strong second-place showing in the Iowa caucuses confounded conventional wisdom, proclaimed himself "the conservative candidate" Monday night and said his performance would "mobilize and crystallize" support in New Hampshire and around the country. "My campaign for the presidency has been given an enormous boost here in Iowa tonight . . . " Robertson said.
NEWS
January 8, 1988 | JAMES RISEN and JOHN BALZAR, Times Staff Writers
Just one month before the Feb. 8 Iowa caucuses--the first real electoral battle of the 1988 presidential contest--the political landscape in Iowa appears confused and uncertain, clouded by the sudden return of a once-fallen prodigal candidate on the Democratic side and shrouded in mystery by the unknown power of a former evangelical preacher and the lingering after-effects of the Iran-Contra scandal among the Republicans.
NEWS
February 9, 1988 | BOB SECTER, Times Staff Writer
Bob Dole, it turned out, was right all along. He was, Iowans concluded, "one of us." That was the motto of his campaign for President here, and Republicans at Monday's caucuses apparently agreed wholeheartedly, handing the senator from nearby Kansas a first place victory so impressive that even Dole's strategists were stunned. "Euphoric," is the way Dole's Midwest director Floyd Brown described the mood in the senator's hotel suite late Monday. Dole himself was more low-key about the results.
NEWS
February 9, 1988 | CATHLEEN DECKER, Times Staff Writer
A chastened Vice President George Bush said he was "disappointed but not down" after an embarrassing third-place finish in the Iowa caucuses, and he acknowledged that voters there had sent him a message. "Work harder in New Hampshire," he said with a wincing grin. While clearly anticipating a loss to Kansas Sen.
NEWS
February 9, 1988 | GEORGE SKELTON, Times Staff Writer
Kansas Sen. Bob Dole and former television evangelist Pat Robertson both capitalized on the disenchantment of Iowa Republicans with the nation's direction to deliver a stunning blow to Vice President George Bush in Monday night's caucuses, the Los Angeles Times Poll found. In addition, Dole and the Democratic winner--Missouri Rep. Richard A. Gephardt--both benefited from their emphasis on agriculture issues.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|