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Republican Party Louisiana

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NEWS
February 3, 1996 | JESSE KATZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first votes of the 1996 presidential race will be cast Tuesday in this tiny Cajun-tinged hamlet, an unlikely site for such a momentous occasion, especially because not a single candidate has visited or bothered to post a sign. Then again, it wasn't political activism but ironic gimmickry that inspired the Louisiana Republican Party to convene its first-in-the-nation caucuses here 30 minutes before they start elsewhere in the state.
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NEWS
September 6, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
David Duke, the former Ku Klux Klan leader who made unsuccessful runs for the U.S. Senate and governor, has been elected chairman of the Republican Executive Committee in a Louisiana parish. The 19-member committee in St. Tammany Parish is responsible for setting Republican policy at the local level. "I consider the St. Tammany a renegade group," said Jeff Crouere, executive director of the Louisiana Republican Party.
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NEWS
January 20, 1996 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Chafing over his failure to break out of the pack in the Republican presidential race, Patrick J. Buchanan is plunging headlong into next month's Louisiana caucuses against heavily favored Sen. Phil Gramm of Texas--a bid that represents the biggest gamble of his political career. Success would gain increased attention and respect for Buchanan's message of economic discontent--the theme around which his campaign is focused.
NEWS
February 3, 1996 | JESSE KATZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first votes of the 1996 presidential race will be cast Tuesday in this tiny Cajun-tinged hamlet, an unlikely site for such a momentous occasion, especially because not a single candidate has visited or bothered to post a sign. Then again, it wasn't political activism but ironic gimmickry that inspired the Louisiana Republican Party to convene its first-in-the-nation caucuses here 30 minutes before they start elsewhere in the state.
NEWS
October 7, 1992 | GARY BOULARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As George Bush struggles to hold together the "Solid South" that helped seal recent Republican presidential victories, his campaign finds itself facing an especially vexing problem in Louisiana--weaving its way through one of the nation's most intricate and volatile intraparty feuds. "Historically, the case in Louisiana has always been that the Democratic Party is divided and the Republicans are unified," said Edward F.
NEWS
June 16, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Rep. Clyde C. Holloway won the Louisiana Republican Party's gubernatorial endorsement. Two other GOP candidates, Gov. Buddy Roemer and state Rep. David Duke, a former Ku Klux Klan leader, were not eligible for endorsement because they had refused to sign a pledge to drop out of the race if the party's backing went to someone else. National Republican officials had said they would support Roemer, who is in his first term, no matter what happened at the state convention in Lafayette.
NEWS
September 24, 1989 | From Associated Press
The state's Republican Committee on Saturday declined to censure state Rep. David Duke for his past as a leader of the Ku Klux Klan. The committee has no authority to kick Duke out of the party, but two committee members who worked on the censure said they had done so because of Duke's past of "promoting racial violence, his anti-Semitism and his neo-Nazi philosophies." Neil Curran and Elizabeth Rickey, both of New Orleans, tried to introduce the resolution at the party's quarterly meeting.
NEWS
July 26, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
State Rep. David Duke, the president of the National Assn. for the Advancement of White People and a former national Ku Klux Klan leader, qualified as a Republican candidate for the U.S. Senate. Duke paid a $900 qualifying fee and filed papers with the secretary of state in Baton Rouge, La., about 20 minutes after state Sen. Ben Bagert of New Orleans, the official GOP candidate. The two candidates are challenging Sen. J. Bennett Johnston, a Democrat who is seeking his fourth term in the Senate.
NEWS
October 7, 1990 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
In an election seen across the nation as a test of race relations, Democratic Sen. J. Bennett Johnston narrowly won reelection Saturday, turning aside a surprisingly stubborn challenge from state Rep. David Duke, a former grand wizard of the Ku Klux Klan. But Duke refused to concede defeat Saturday night, and his powerful showing immediately sparked predictions that he would bid for another high office as soon as next year.
NEWS
February 20, 1989 | ROBERT SHOGAN, Times Political Writer
The election of David Duke, former Ku Klux Klan leader and recent convert to Republicanism, to the Louisiana Legislature on Saturday could hardly have come at a worse time for the GOP--just as its high command was launching a much heralded effort to broaden the party by reaching out to blacks and other minorities.
NEWS
January 20, 1996 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Chafing over his failure to break out of the pack in the Republican presidential race, Patrick J. Buchanan is plunging headlong into next month's Louisiana caucuses against heavily favored Sen. Phil Gramm of Texas--a bid that represents the biggest gamble of his political career. Success would gain increased attention and respect for Buchanan's message of economic discontent--the theme around which his campaign is focused.
NEWS
November 19, 1995 | From Associated Press
Republican Mike Foster won the race for Louisiana governor Saturday, easily defeating the man trying to be the first black person elected to the office. With 99% of the vote reported, Foster had 64%, or 972,882 votes. Democratic Rep. Cleo Fields had 36%, or 554,993.
NEWS
January 8, 1995 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was virtually a private party Saturday for Sen. Phil Gramm of Texas as Louisiana Republicans gave him a resounding victory here in the first test of strength between the likely contenders for the 1996 GOP presidential nomination. Gramm wooed the delegates to the state Republican convention with military efficiency, filled the hall with newly minted "Gramm" placards, delivered a rousing speech Saturday morning and was rewarded with a head-turning 72% of the 1,248 votes cast.
NEWS
October 7, 1992 | GARY BOULARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As George Bush struggles to hold together the "Solid South" that helped seal recent Republican presidential victories, his campaign finds itself facing an especially vexing problem in Louisiana--weaving its way through one of the nation's most intricate and volatile intraparty feuds. "Historically, the case in Louisiana has always been that the Democratic Party is divided and the Republicans are unified," said Edward F.
NEWS
October 20, 1991 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
With a strong showing in Saturday's Louisiana gubernatorial primary, former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke gained a chance to compete in a runoff against former Democratic Gov. Edwin W. Edwards. Incumbent Republican Gov. Buddy Roemer finished third. Edwards led the field of 12, including U.S. Rep. Clyde C. Holloway, the endorsed choice of the state Republican Party.
NEWS
June 16, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Rep. Clyde C. Holloway won the Louisiana Republican Party's gubernatorial endorsement. Two other GOP candidates, Gov. Buddy Roemer and state Rep. David Duke, a former Ku Klux Klan leader, were not eligible for endorsement because they had refused to sign a pledge to drop out of the race if the party's backing went to someone else. National Republican officials had said they would support Roemer, who is in his first term, no matter what happened at the state convention in Lafayette.
NEWS
January 8, 1995 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was virtually a private party Saturday for Sen. Phil Gramm of Texas as Louisiana Republicans gave him a resounding victory here in the first test of strength between the likely contenders for the 1996 GOP presidential nomination. Gramm wooed the delegates to the state Republican convention with military efficiency, filled the hall with newly minted "Gramm" placards, delivered a rousing speech Saturday morning and was rewarded with a head-turning 72% of the 1,248 votes cast.
NEWS
June 14, 1991 | PATRICK THOMAS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Louisiana Republican Party is expected to defy the national party leadership Saturday by nominating U.S. Rep. Clyde C. Holloway for governor, shunning incumbent Gov. Buddy Roemer, who switched from the Democratic to Republican Party in March. The nomination of Holloway, a little-known conservative with strong ties to the state's anti-abortion movement, will further splinter a crowded field in the fall election.
NEWS
March 12, 1991 | GARRY BOULARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Buddy Roemer, the maverick governor of Louisiana who has built much of his political career around doing things unconventionally, Monday outdid himself by announcing he was leaving the Democratic Party of his heritage to become a Republican. In an elaborate, sun-baked ceremony on the steps of the governor's mansion, the 47-year-old Harvard graduate, flanked by Louisiana Republican Party officials, said: "It was time to stop the debate about the party to which I belong. I am a Republican. . . .
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