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July 26, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Rep. Rick Lazio (R-N.Y.), over the objections of some GOP leaders in New York, has confirmed he will seek the party's nomination for the U.S. Senate seat in which First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton could be the Democratic candidate. The Long Island congressman has been under pressure from some fellow Republicans to drop his interest in contesting a primary for the November 2000 election and pave the way for the expected candidacy of New York Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani.
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NEWS
May 31, 2000 | From Associated Press
His fresh face marred by a fat lip, Rep. Rick Lazio was nominated by the Republican Party on Tuesday to battle Hillary Rodham Clinton in the nation's most closely watched Senate race. To the cheers of more than 400 delegates and hundreds of other supporters, Lazio--a little-known Long Island congressman who entered the race after New York Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani withdrew because of prostate cancer--was declared the unanimous pick of the party's state convention.
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NEWS
May 31, 2000 | From Associated Press
His fresh face marred by a fat lip, Rep. Rick Lazio was nominated by the Republican Party on Tuesday to battle Hillary Rodham Clinton in the nation's most closely watched Senate race. To the cheers of more than 400 delegates and hundreds of other supporters, Lazio--a little-known Long Island congressman who entered the race after New York Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani withdrew because of prostate cancer--was declared the unanimous pick of the party's state convention.
NEWS
May 21, 2000 | From Associated Press
From the gym of his former high school on Long Island, relatively unknown Republican Rep. Rick Lazio catapulted himself Saturday into the nation's most-talked-about political campaign--the Senate race against Hillary Rodham Clinton. "You can tell from my accent that I am a lifelong New Yorker," Lazio said in an obvious swipe at the first lady. "I don't have to fake it. . . . I've never needed an exploratory committee to help me figure out where I wanted to live."
NEWS
May 20, 2000 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Republicans scramble to find a successor to Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani in the U.S. Senate race, all eyes are turning toward Rick Lazio, an up-and-coming but little-known Long Island congressman who appears to be the solid favorite of Gov. George Pataki and other GOP leaders to carry on the fight against Hillary Rodham Clinton.
NEWS
May 21, 2000 | From Associated Press
From the gym of his former high school on Long Island, relatively unknown Republican Rep. Rick Lazio catapulted himself Saturday into the nation's most-talked-about political campaign--the Senate race against Hillary Rodham Clinton. "You can tell from my accent that I am a lifelong New Yorker," Lazio said in an obvious swipe at the first lady. "I don't have to fake it. . . . I've never needed an exploratory committee to help me figure out where I wanted to live."
NEWS
November 28, 1995 | Associated Press
A federal judge on Monday said New York's Republican presidential primary violates the Constitution, and ordered changes to make it easier for candidates to qualify in areas with few GOP voters. In a complex oral ruling in Brooklyn, U.S. District Judge Edward R. Korman told Republican Party lawyers to draft a new set of rules in the next day or so.
NEWS
December 15, 1998 | EDWIN CHEN and MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
With a cliffhanger House impeachment vote looming, it is the independent-minded Republicans of New York state, more than any other congressional delegation, who are poised to cast the potential deciding votes on President Clinton's fate. The bulky delegations of California and Texas by and large already have declared their intentions--for the most part toeing the party line.
NEWS
May 20, 2000 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Republicans scramble to find a successor to Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani in the U.S. Senate race, all eyes are turning toward Rick Lazio, an up-and-coming but little-known Long Island congressman who appears to be the solid favorite of Gov. George Pataki and other GOP leaders to carry on the fight against Hillary Rodham Clinton.
NEWS
July 26, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Rep. Rick Lazio (R-N.Y.), over the objections of some GOP leaders in New York, has confirmed he will seek the party's nomination for the U.S. Senate seat in which First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton could be the Democratic candidate. The Long Island congressman has been under pressure from some fellow Republicans to drop his interest in contesting a primary for the November 2000 election and pave the way for the expected candidacy of New York Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani.
NEWS
December 15, 1998 | EDWIN CHEN and MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
With a cliffhanger House impeachment vote looming, it is the independent-minded Republicans of New York state, more than any other congressional delegation, who are poised to cast the potential deciding votes on President Clinton's fate. The bulky delegations of California and Texas by and large already have declared their intentions--for the most part toeing the party line.
NEWS
November 28, 1995 | Associated Press
A federal judge on Monday said New York's Republican presidential primary violates the Constitution, and ordered changes to make it easier for candidates to qualify in areas with few GOP voters. In a complex oral ruling in Brooklyn, U.S. District Judge Edward R. Korman told Republican Party lawyers to draft a new set of rules in the next day or so.
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