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Republican Party Platform

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1992
Re "Delegate Angry Gays Left Out of GOP Platform," Aug. 18: As a gay Democrat I have to say that I've never understood the concept of gay Republicans or the Log Cabin Federation. Being gay and a Republican seems to be embracing and supporting the very people who hate you. Something is wrong with Frank Ricchiazzi's thinking when he says "And the only way to make change is from the inside." This is like being Jewish and joining the Nazi party or being black and joining the KKK. The Democrats on the other hand have included lesbians and gay men. My suggestion to Ricchiazzi is to join the Democrats and work from within a party that accepts him as a complete human being worthy of equal rights and protection under the law. Lou Sheldon, Pat Robertson and Pat Buchanan are enemies of my community and the Republican Party not only embraces them and what they stand for, but holds them up as their leaders.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
April 9, 2013 | Jonah Goldberg
In 1975, when asked to explain why Margaret Thatcher was poised to take over the Tory Party, the irascible British satirist Malcolm Muggeridge replied that it was all due to television and the fact that the telegenic Thatcher had a "certain imbecile charm. " That was one of the nicer things said about an "imbecile" who earned a degree in chemistry from Oxford and passed the bar while studying law at home. The lesson here is that being underestimated is a great gift in politics.
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NEWS
August 20, 2012 | By Paul West
TAMPA, Fla. - It didn't take long for strains within the Republican Party to surface Monday as national delegates got down to work on a final draft of the party platform, one week before the nominating convention opens. Ron Paul delegates are making a diligent effort to wedge the defeated presidential candidate's libertarian ideas into the party document. Among them: curbing the power of the Federal Reserve, enhancing the constitutional rights of individuals and opposing the overseas role of U.S. military forces.
NATIONAL
August 22, 2012 | By Mark Z. Barabak, Los Angeles Times
Days before the launch of a convention vital to his election hopes, Mitt Romney and fellow Republicans were embroiled Tuesday in an effort to shove aside a U.S. Senate candidate who thrust the unwelcome issue of abortion to the fore of the political debate. In Tampa, Fla., where convention delegates were drafting the Republican Party platform, the controversy drew wide attention to a plank opposing abortion with no exception for victims of rape or incest. "Well done," said Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell, chairman of the platform committee, praising delegates for avoiding the sort of prolonged debate that threatened to fracture Republicans in previous party gatherings.
NATIONAL
August 26, 2004 | Nick Anderson, Times Staff Writer
The emerging Republican Party platform embraces a constitutional amendment to ban same-sex marriage -- despite an unusual open split on the matter between President Bush and Vice President Dick Cheney -- and declares that only heterosexual couples should receive legal recognition and related benefits. Republican platform drafters on Wednesday speedily and easily approved the unprecedented party policy statement on marriage.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 1994
In her letter of July 20, Brenda R. Martin chastises Gov. Wilson, accusing him of being a "closet liberal." She bases this charge solely on the fact that Wilson opposes an anti-abortion plank for the Republican Party platform. This is a perfect example of what is wrong with politics nowadays. We are more concerned with slapping labels on people based on one position, one vote, one speech, or one issue, than we are with honestly examining the whole package. I am still not supporting Pete Wilson, but it is certainly not due to his stance on abortion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1996
Re "Target the Parents, Not Party Platform," Commentary, Aug. 1: I am pleased to see Gov. Pete Wilson interjecting reason into the Republican end of the fevered abortion debate. A genuine concern for life must extend beyond the fetal period, and an opposition to abortion must not ignore simple social policies that could discourage unwanted pregnancies in the first place. It all seems so obvious, and yet our politicians have spent the greater part of this election year deliberately circumventing the obvious in misguided attempts to discredit one another's parties.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 1999
Bill Press, in "GOP Comes to Its Senses on Abortion" (Commentary, March 25), writes about taking out the pro-life plank from the Republican Party platform. Three points come to mind: The majority of Americans don't support Roe vs. Wade as written, which supports abortion on demand for any reason during all nine months of pregnancy, including partial-birth abortion. If the two parties are the same on life, why would Democrats who are against abortion cross over to a Republican candidate as they did for President Reagan?
NEWS
August 1, 2000
The Republican Party platform is expected to be approved today. Democrats will consider their platform when their convention begins Aug. 14 in Los Angeles. Brief summaries of some key proposals in both platforms: Proposed Platforms Abortion Republican: Support a constitutional amendment that would ban abortions. Appoint anti-abortion judges. Democratic: Support every woman's right to have an abortion, consistent with Roe vs. Wade and regardless of ability to pay.
OPINION
April 9, 2013 | Jonah Goldberg
In 1975, when asked to explain why Margaret Thatcher was poised to take over the Tory Party, the irascible British satirist Malcolm Muggeridge replied that it was all due to television and the fact that the telegenic Thatcher had a "certain imbecile charm. " That was one of the nicer things said about an "imbecile" who earned a degree in chemistry from Oxford and passed the bar while studying law at home. The lesson here is that being underestimated is a great gift in politics.
NEWS
August 20, 2012 | By Paul West
TAMPA, Fla. - It didn't take long for strains within the Republican Party to surface Monday as national delegates got down to work on a final draft of the party platform, one week before the nominating convention opens. Ron Paul delegates are making a diligent effort to wedge the defeated presidential candidate's libertarian ideas into the party document. Among them: curbing the power of the Federal Reserve, enhancing the constitutional rights of individuals and opposing the overseas role of U.S. military forces.
NATIONAL
August 26, 2004 | Nick Anderson, Times Staff Writer
The emerging Republican Party platform embraces a constitutional amendment to ban same-sex marriage -- despite an unusual open split on the matter between President Bush and Vice President Dick Cheney -- and declares that only heterosexual couples should receive legal recognition and related benefits. Republican platform drafters on Wednesday speedily and easily approved the unprecedented party policy statement on marriage.
NEWS
August 1, 2000
The Republican Party platform is expected to be approved today. Democrats will consider their platform when their convention begins Aug. 14 in Los Angeles. Brief summaries of some key proposals in both platforms: Proposed Platforms Abortion Republican: Support a constitutional amendment that would ban abortions. Appoint anti-abortion judges. Democratic: Support every woman's right to have an abortion, consistent with Roe vs. Wade and regardless of ability to pay.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 2000 | EILEEN E. PADBERG, Eileen E. Padberg is a Republican political consultant in Irvine
Much has been said about the gender gap and the Republican Party. As the election for president draws near, more and more pundits will be asking, "What is the gender gap and is it real?" The gender gap is a serious, well-thought-out and intelligent disagreement on substantive social issues.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 1999
Bill Press, in "GOP Comes to Its Senses on Abortion" (Commentary, March 25), writes about taking out the pro-life plank from the Republican Party platform. Three points come to mind: The majority of Americans don't support Roe vs. Wade as written, which supports abortion on demand for any reason during all nine months of pregnancy, including partial-birth abortion. If the two parties are the same on life, why would Democrats who are against abortion cross over to a Republican candidate as they did for President Reagan?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1996
Re "Target the Parents, Not Party Platform," Commentary, Aug. 1: I am pleased to see Gov. Pete Wilson interjecting reason into the Republican end of the fevered abortion debate. A genuine concern for life must extend beyond the fetal period, and an opposition to abortion must not ignore simple social policies that could discourage unwanted pregnancies in the first place. It all seems so obvious, and yet our politicians have spent the greater part of this election year deliberately circumventing the obvious in misguided attempts to discredit one another's parties.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 1994
In her letter of July 20, Brenda R. Martin chastises Gov. Wilson, accusing him of being a "closet liberal." She bases this charge solely on the fact that Wilson opposes an anti-abortion plank for the Republican Party platform. This is a perfect example of what is wrong with politics nowadays. We are more concerned with slapping labels on people based on one position, one vote, one speech, or one issue, than we are with honestly examining the whole package. I am still not supporting Pete Wilson, but it is certainly not due to his stance on abortion.
NEWS
May 23, 1993 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Suddenly there is new life in the Grand Old Party. Six months after the Democrats kicked the stuffing out of them and took away the White House, Republicans at every level are caught up in a burst of brainstorming. They are thrashing out disagreements over abortion and other old sore points and striving to draft fresh approaches to the conundrums of a new political age.
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