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NEWS
October 10, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
While Democrats at all levels fight to preserve a failing education system, Republican governors are taking bold steps to demand better results from students and teachers, Gov. Paul Cellucci of Massachusetts said. Cellucci, in the weekly GOP radio address, credited his fellow governors for bucking the status quo and using high-stakes tests to hold students and schools accountable.
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NEWS
December 28, 2000 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Far more than a gauge of which state is up and which is down, the decennial head count to be released today will redistribute power in two critical institutions of American democracy: the House of Representatives and the electoral college. In an ordinary year, the changes likely to emerge from the new census data would seem small.
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NEWS
October 10, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
While Democrats at all levels fight to preserve a failing education system, Republican governors are taking bold steps to demand better results from students and teachers, Gov. Paul Cellucci of Massachusetts said. Cellucci, in the weekly GOP radio address, credited his fellow governors for bucking the status quo and using high-stakes tests to hold students and schools accountable.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 1992 | ERIC BAILEY
At a time when the nation is yearning for strong political leadership at the top, the Democratic Party has produced second-tier presidential candidates while the Republican incumbent appears befuddled by his job, a panel of national journalists said Monday.
NEWS
November 18, 1994 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL and JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Call it the "Silence of the Dems." With incoming House Speaker Newt Gingrich of Georgia, Senate Republican leader Bob Dole of Kansas and a host of other GOP victors from last week's elections saturating the airwaves, the virtual soundlessness of the Democratic leadership on Capitol Hill has been deafening. To some extent, the silence reflects a conscious tactical decision by Democratic leaders on the Hill and at the White House, according to sources who requested anonymity.
NEWS
November 18, 1994 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A critical internal battle is shaping up between the cadre of militant Republicans who will control the House next year and their more moderate counterparts in the Senate over the appointment of a new director of the Congressional Budget Office. And the outcome of that struggle, one of the first to emerge since the Republican electoral avalanche on Nov. 8, could set the tone for the broader fight looming within the party for control of the GOP economic agenda in the new Congress.
NEWS
December 28, 2000 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Far more than a gauge of which state is up and which is down, the decennial head count to be released today will redistribute power in two critical institutions of American democracy: the House of Representatives and the electoral college. In an ordinary year, the changes likely to emerge from the new census data would seem small.
NEWS
September 30, 1995 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the morning of Jan. 26, 1993, Dorothy Garrison got the kind of telephone call that is the stuff of nightmares for every American with a parent in a nursing home. "Your mother has fallen," the nurse at Cogburn Health Center said. "She's bleeding pretty bad." The call was not entirely unexpected. Merle Davis, then 86, had been admitted to Cogburn nine months before for what was to have been a brief stay for physical therapy to help her walk.
NEWS
September 30, 1995 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the morning of Jan. 26, 1993, Dorothy Garrison got the kind of telephone call that is the stuff of nightmares for every American with a parent in a nursing home. "Your mother has fallen," the nurse at Cogburn Health Center said. "She's bleeding pretty bad." The call was not entirely unexpected. Merle Davis, then 86, had been admitted to Cogburn nine months before for what was to have been a brief stay for physical therapy to help her walk.
NEWS
November 18, 1994 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL and JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Call it the "Silence of the Dems." With incoming House Speaker Newt Gingrich of Georgia, Senate Republican leader Bob Dole of Kansas and a host of other GOP victors from last week's elections saturating the airwaves, the virtual soundlessness of the Democratic leadership on Capitol Hill has been deafening. To some extent, the silence reflects a conscious tactical decision by Democratic leaders on the Hill and at the White House, according to sources who requested anonymity.
NEWS
November 18, 1994 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A critical internal battle is shaping up between the cadre of militant Republicans who will control the House next year and their more moderate counterparts in the Senate over the appointment of a new director of the Congressional Budget Office. And the outcome of that struggle, one of the first to emerge since the Republican electoral avalanche on Nov. 8, could set the tone for the broader fight looming within the party for control of the GOP economic agenda in the new Congress.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 1992 | ERIC BAILEY
At a time when the nation is yearning for strong political leadership at the top, the Democratic Party has produced second-tier presidential candidates while the Republican incumbent appears befuddled by his job, a panel of national journalists said Monday.
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