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Republican Response

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NEWS
January 19, 2012 | By Michael A. Memoli
Indiana Gov. Mitch Daniels will deliver the Republican response to President Obama's State of the Union address Tuesday, congressional Republicans have announced. Daniels is beginning the final year of his two-term governorship of a state Obama narrowly carried in the 2008 campaign. A former budget director to President George W. Bush, he has been a critic of Obama's fiscal stewardship of the nation. "Mitch Daniels is a fierce advocate for smaller, less costly and more accountable government, and has the record to prove it," House Speaker John Boehner said in a statement.
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NATIONAL
February 14, 2013 | By David Horsey
It is no wonder Florida Sen. Marco Rubio needed to grab a bottle of water in the middle of delivering the Republican response to President Obama's State of the Union address. The speech he was given to recite was like a hunk of stale, dry sourdough and it surely caught in his throat.  For 30 years, Republican aspirants to the presidency have been giving variations of the same speech. It sounded fresh and bold when Ronald Reagan first spoke the words as a candidate in 1980. At that point, the liberal era that began with Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1932 had pretty much run out of gas. Democrats had grown too comfortable with their seemingly permanent lock on the House of Representatives, while their ideas about the creative use of government had devolved into a system of doling out federal dollars to clamoring interest groups.
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NEWS
January 24, 2012 | By Michael A. Memoli
President Obama will vow to "fight obstruction with action" in his State of the Union address tonight, signaling the extent to which he will use an unpopular Congress as foil as he campaigns for a new term this year. "As long as I'm president, I will work with anyone in this chamber to build on this momentum. But I intend to fight obstruction with action, and I will oppose any effort to return to the very same policies that brought on this economic crisis in the first place," Obama is expected to say this evening, according to advance excerpts of the address provided by the White House.
NATIONAL
February 13, 2013 | By David Horsey
What appears to be the fiery finale to Christopher Dorner's violent rampage across Southern California nearly upstaged President Obama's State of the Union address. As the seconds ticked down to the start of the speech, it seemed as though Anderson Cooper and the folks at CNN were awfully reluctant to break away from the burning cabin near Big Bear where the disgruntled, unhinged ex-cop from the Los Angeles Police Department appeared to be holed up.  Nevertheless, the cable news organizations did their duty and switched from the sensational to the substantial.
NATIONAL
February 13, 2013 | By David Horsey
What appears to be the fiery finale to Christopher Dorner's violent rampage across Southern California nearly upstaged President Obama's State of the Union address. As the seconds ticked down to the start of the speech, it seemed as though Anderson Cooper and the folks at CNN were awfully reluctant to break away from the burning cabin near Big Bear where the disgruntled, unhinged ex-cop from the Los Angeles Police Department appeared to be holed up.  Nevertheless, the cable news organizations did their duty and switched from the sensational to the substantial.
NATIONAL
February 14, 2013 | By David Horsey
It is no wonder Florida Sen. Marco Rubio needed to grab a bottle of water in the middle of delivering the Republican response to President Obama's State of the Union address. The speech he was given to recite was like a hunk of stale, dry sourdough and it surely caught in his throat.  For 30 years, Republican aspirants to the presidency have been giving variations of the same speech. It sounded fresh and bold when Ronald Reagan first spoke the words as a candidate in 1980. At that point, the liberal era that began with Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1932 had pretty much run out of gas. Democrats had grown too comfortable with their seemingly permanent lock on the House of Representatives, while their ideas about the creative use of government had devolved into a system of doling out federal dollars to clamoring interest groups.
OPINION
November 11, 2005
Re "GOP Leaders Urge Prison Leak Inquiry," Nov. 9 A week after the news of our secret "gulag" prisons came out, Republican leaders in Congress are calling for a leak investigation. These are the same people who have stalled for more than a year an investigation into whether President Bush lied us into a war. And, of course, the White House also stonewalled the Rove-Libby investigation. How do you spell hypocrite? ALEX MAGDALENO Camarillo How interesting to hear Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist (R-Tenn.
NEWS
March 10, 1996 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton on Saturday took a tough line in the budget battle with congressional Republicans, saying "there should be no threat of another government shutdown." The president brushed aside GOP proposals to offer some additional funds for domestic programs Clinton favors as part of a budget-balancing package that would include GOP-backed changes in Medicare.
NEWS
November 28, 1995 | JOHN M. BRODER and ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Clinton sought to rally a leery nation Monday behind his pledge to commit 20,000 troops to defend a brittle peace in Bosnia-Herzegovina, asserting that America's values and interests "require that we do so." In a solemn Oval Office address, the President said that leading an international peacekeeping force in the bloody Balkans is the United States' moral burden and geopolitical duty. But even with those imperatives, Clinton acknowledged the limits of U.S.
NATIONAL
April 29, 2012 | By Matea Gold and Melanie Mason, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Ten months into his term as Massachusetts governor, Mitt Romney was abruptly confronted with an emotionally charged issue: The state's highest court ruled that gays had the legal right to marry, thrusting the state into the forefront of the same-sex marriage debate. Romney, now the presumptive Republican presidential nominee, faced one of the biggest challenges of his four years in office. His response would alienate constituencies on both sides and contribute to criticisms that he shifted positions for political gain, a charge renewed in his two bids for the White House.
NATIONAL
April 29, 2012 | By Matea Gold and Melanie Mason, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Ten months into his term as Massachusetts governor, Mitt Romney was abruptly confronted with an emotionally charged issue: The state's highest court ruled that gays had the legal right to marry, thrusting the state into the forefront of the same-sex marriage debate. Romney, now the presumptive Republican presidential nominee, faced one of the biggest challenges of his four years in office. His response would alienate constituencies on both sides and contribute to criticisms that he shifted positions for political gain, a charge renewed in his two bids for the White House.
NEWS
January 24, 2012 | By Michael A. Memoli
President Obama will vow to "fight obstruction with action" in his State of the Union address tonight, signaling the extent to which he will use an unpopular Congress as foil as he campaigns for a new term this year. "As long as I'm president, I will work with anyone in this chamber to build on this momentum. But I intend to fight obstruction with action, and I will oppose any effort to return to the very same policies that brought on this economic crisis in the first place," Obama is expected to say this evening, according to advance excerpts of the address provided by the White House.
NEWS
January 19, 2012 | By Michael A. Memoli
Indiana Gov. Mitch Daniels will deliver the Republican response to President Obama's State of the Union address Tuesday, congressional Republicans have announced. Daniels is beginning the final year of his two-term governorship of a state Obama narrowly carried in the 2008 campaign. A former budget director to President George W. Bush, he has been a critic of Obama's fiscal stewardship of the nation. "Mitch Daniels is a fierce advocate for smaller, less costly and more accountable government, and has the record to prove it," House Speaker John Boehner said in a statement.
NEWS
January 25, 2011 | By James Oliphant, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON -- Senate Democrats on Tuesday launched a preemptive strike on Rep. Paul Ryan, who will deliver the official Republican response to President Obama's State of the Union address. Ryan, who turns 41 later this week, is viewed as a rising star of the party, a budget hawk who hasn't been afraid to spark conversations about taking on entitlement programs such as Medicaid and Social Security. For months, Democrats have tried to tie Ryan's past proposals to reshape both programs to the rest of the GOP. Since Ryan has taken the helm of the House Budget Committee, the Wisconsinite has been more circumspect in his words.
OPINION
November 11, 2005
Re "GOP Leaders Urge Prison Leak Inquiry," Nov. 9 A week after the news of our secret "gulag" prisons came out, Republican leaders in Congress are calling for a leak investigation. These are the same people who have stalled for more than a year an investigation into whether President Bush lied us into a war. And, of course, the White House also stonewalled the Rove-Libby investigation. How do you spell hypocrite? ALEX MAGDALENO Camarillo How interesting to hear Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist (R-Tenn.
NEWS
March 10, 1996 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton on Saturday took a tough line in the budget battle with congressional Republicans, saying "there should be no threat of another government shutdown." The president brushed aside GOP proposals to offer some additional funds for domestic programs Clinton favors as part of a budget-balancing package that would include GOP-backed changes in Medicare.
NEWS
January 25, 2011 | By James Oliphant, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON -- Senate Democrats on Tuesday launched a preemptive strike on Rep. Paul Ryan, who will deliver the official Republican response to President Obama's State of the Union address. Ryan, who turns 41 later this week, is viewed as a rising star of the party, a budget hawk who hasn't been afraid to spark conversations about taking on entitlement programs such as Medicaid and Social Security. For months, Democrats have tried to tie Ryan's past proposals to reshape both programs to the rest of the GOP. Since Ryan has taken the helm of the House Budget Committee, the Wisconsinite has been more circumspect in his words.
NATIONAL
January 24, 2012 | By David Lauter, Washington Bureau
By using his State of the Union speech to draw sharp contrasts with Republicans on such high-profile issues as taxes and the housing market, President Obama opened an election-year debate on the role of government that could be more intense than any in decades. Warning Congress that "I intend to fight obstruction with action," he painted a confrontational picture that stands in sharp contrast with the conciliatory approach taken by the last Democrat to seek a second term, Bill Clinton.
NEWS
November 28, 1995 | JOHN M. BRODER and ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Clinton sought to rally a leery nation Monday behind his pledge to commit 20,000 troops to defend a brittle peace in Bosnia-Herzegovina, asserting that America's values and interests "require that we do so." In a solemn Oval Office address, the President said that leading an international peacekeeping force in the bloody Balkans is the United States' moral burden and geopolitical duty. But even with those imperatives, Clinton acknowledged the limits of U.S.
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