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Republican Revolution

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 1995
I have only one word of caution for Newt Gingrich: Robespierre. HENRY C. OSTERMILLER Costa Mesa
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NATIONAL
April 11, 2010 | By Andrew Malcolm and Johanna Neuman
Massachusetts Democratic Rep. Barney Frank traces the hyper-partisan atmosphere of the nation today to -- wait for it -- the rise of Republican Speaker Newt Gingrich in 1994. Gingrich was a driving force behind that year's so-called Republican Revolution that seized control of both houses of Congress with the "Contract With America" after the first two years of President Clinton's first term. Some Republicans hope for a repeat of that experience in this November's first midterm election for the Obama administration.
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NATIONAL
April 11, 2010 | By Andrew Malcolm and Johanna Neuman
Massachusetts Democratic Rep. Barney Frank traces the hyper-partisan atmosphere of the nation today to -- wait for it -- the rise of Republican Speaker Newt Gingrich in 1994. Gingrich was a driving force behind that year's so-called Republican Revolution that seized control of both houses of Congress with the "Contract With America" after the first two years of President Clinton's first term. Some Republicans hope for a repeat of that experience in this November's first midterm election for the Obama administration.
OPINION
March 3, 2010 | By Matthew Continetti
As you read this, conservatives, "tea partyers" and Republicans are wildly confident and enthusiastic. They feel the wind at their backs. At the recent Conservative Political Action Conference, the guest speakers all foretold major Republican gains, with Dick Cheney confidently asserting that "Barack Obama is going to be a one-term president" and Newt Gingrich telling attendees the GOP would capture Congress in November. It's understandable that politicians would want to rally the base with bold predictions of future success.
MAGAZINE
January 28, 1996 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN and DAN BALZ, Adapted from "Storming the Gates: Protest Politics and the Republican Revival," by national political correspondents Ronald Brownstein of The Times and Dan Balz of the Washington Post; published this month by Little, Brown & Co
Steven Spielberg at Spago's on Oscar night would not have generated more of a stir than Newt Gingrich did when he slipped through the door into Grover Norquist's crowded Capitol Hill townhouse precisely at 11 o'clock on the evening of April 7, 1995.
NEWS
January 2, 2000 | Steve Padilla
Times reporters and editors predict what lies ahead in their areas in the coming year: Politics * The White House and Beyond * More is at stake than the presidency in the elections of 2000. Republicans hold just a five-vote majority in the House of Representatives, and Democrats hope they can reclaim the body they lost to the Republican Revolution led by Newt Gingrich in the 1994. Retaking the Senate is a much more difficult prospect for Democrats, with Republicans holding a 55-to-45 majority.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 1995
Richard N. Goodwin's "Economic Justice Dies a Slow Death" (Commentary, Oct. 18) says it all. The so-called Republican revolution beginning with Ronald Reagan's policies has had one effect: Our country resembles a Third World nation more than ever before. Look at the streets; look at the public infrastructure; look at health statistics. Do the Republicans realize they are presiding over the "Latin Americanization" of the U.S.? The widening gap between the rich and the poor, the growing disregard for working-class people, the declining educational systems, complacency about conditions in the workplace, exorbitant greed at the corporate level and government totally in bed with the high and the mighty are qualities we have come to expect in the world's undemocratic regimes.
OPINION
January 2, 2009
Re "GOP leader holds on to hope in a gloomy year," Dec. 29 The California Republican Party is not dead. The conservative Republican Party of Mike Spence is dying because it's been poorly managed and has no plan that deals with updating the state's social and economic model based on current reality. It continues to live in the past. The new Republican Party will be successful when it gets new leadership that represents all the segments of our population, has a plan that realistically addresses the state's dysfunctional government and infrastructure, and can clearly communicate both the negative financial and social services effects of what's currently going on -- and the necessary steps to correct the mess we're in. Robert M. Green San Dimas :: It is unfortunate that Spence believes following on the trail of Proposition 8 will spark a Republican revolution.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 1996 | BARRY GOLDWATER, Barry Goldwater represented Arizona in the U.S. Senate from 1953 to 1965 and from 1969 to 1987. He was the GOP presidential candidate in 1964
Just two years ago, we celebrated the historic Republican takeover of Congress. Now a few right-wing fanatics are trying to wreck the revolution. The Republican majority was elected to balance the budget and right the wrongs of 40 years of Democratic rule. This revolution was about creating hope and opportunity for our children and grandchildren. True conservatives have tried to stay the course and remain focused on these popular American ideals. Unfortunately, there are detractors in our ranks.
NEWS
February 8, 1996 | GEORGE SKELTON
When the American revolutionaries won their decisive battle at Yorktown in 1781, bands struck up the prophetic notes of "The World Turned Upside Down." After Assembly Republicans firmly established their legislative dominance last week, they brought out a boombox and played the Beatles' "Revolution." Not that we should be identifying "the Republican revolution" with the founding of our republic--or associating GOP Speaker Curt Pringle with Gen.
NATIONAL
December 27, 2009 | By Andrew Malcolm and Johanna Neuman
President Obama recently signed a disaster declaration for the state of Alabama. But that involved damage from last month's Tropical Storm Ida and had nothing to do with Tuesday's defection of a representative from his Democratic Party over to the Republicans. Parker Griffith, a radiation oncologist in real life, was just elected to the House last year from northern Alabama's 5th District after the retirement of nine-term Democratic incumbent Bud Cramer. Griffith won by only some 9,000 votes.
OPINION
January 2, 2009
Re "GOP leader holds on to hope in a gloomy year," Dec. 29 The California Republican Party is not dead. The conservative Republican Party of Mike Spence is dying because it's been poorly managed and has no plan that deals with updating the state's social and economic model based on current reality. It continues to live in the past. The new Republican Party will be successful when it gets new leadership that represents all the segments of our population, has a plan that realistically addresses the state's dysfunctional government and infrastructure, and can clearly communicate both the negative financial and social services effects of what's currently going on -- and the necessary steps to correct the mess we're in. Robert M. Green San Dimas :: It is unfortunate that Spence believes following on the trail of Proposition 8 will spark a Republican revolution.
NEWS
January 2, 2000 | Steve Padilla
Times reporters and editors predict what lies ahead in their areas in the coming year: Politics * The White House and Beyond * More is at stake than the presidency in the elections of 2000. Republicans hold just a five-vote majority in the House of Representatives, and Democrats hope they can reclaim the body they lost to the Republican Revolution led by Newt Gingrich in the 1994. Retaking the Senate is a much more difficult prospect for Democrats, with Republicans holding a 55-to-45 majority.
OPINION
March 16, 1997 | DAN SCHNUR, Dan Schnur, a Republican commentator and analyst, is a visiting instructor at UC Berkeley's Institute of Government Studies
Whatever happened to Newt Gingrich? Only two years ago, Gingrich was the unquestioned leader of the Republican revolution. He was more than merely speaker of the House; he was a teacher for a generation of conservative activists eager to assume their new majority status. But now, two government shutdowns, a shrunken majority and a bitter ethics battle later, the teacher no longer teaches. The leader no longer leads. The speaker hardly even speaks.
NEWS
March 8, 1997 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
When Republicans retained control of Congress last fall, the party's leaders thought that they had dodged a bullet and kept alive their conservative revolution. But major legislative setbacks have followed quickly and this week came the crowning blow: House Speaker Newt Gingrich postponed the revolution for four more years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 1996 | BARRY GOLDWATER, Barry Goldwater represented Arizona in the U.S. Senate from 1953 to 1965 and from 1969 to 1987. He was the GOP presidential candidate in 1964
Just two years ago, we celebrated the historic Republican takeover of Congress. Now a few right-wing fanatics are trying to wreck the revolution. The Republican majority was elected to balance the budget and right the wrongs of 40 years of Democratic rule. This revolution was about creating hope and opportunity for our children and grandchildren. True conservatives have tried to stay the course and remain focused on these popular American ideals. Unfortunately, there are detractors in our ranks.
OPINION
March 3, 2010 | By Matthew Continetti
As you read this, conservatives, "tea partyers" and Republicans are wildly confident and enthusiastic. They feel the wind at their backs. At the recent Conservative Political Action Conference, the guest speakers all foretold major Republican gains, with Dick Cheney confidently asserting that "Barack Obama is going to be a one-term president" and Newt Gingrich telling attendees the GOP would capture Congress in November. It's understandable that politicians would want to rally the base with bold predictions of future success.
NATIONAL
December 27, 2009 | By Andrew Malcolm and Johanna Neuman
President Obama recently signed a disaster declaration for the state of Alabama. But that involved damage from last month's Tropical Storm Ida and had nothing to do with Tuesday's defection of a representative from his Democratic Party over to the Republicans. Parker Griffith, a radiation oncologist in real life, was just elected to the House last year from northern Alabama's 5th District after the retirement of nine-term Democratic incumbent Bud Cramer. Griffith won by only some 9,000 votes.
NEWS
February 8, 1996 | GEORGE SKELTON
When the American revolutionaries won their decisive battle at Yorktown in 1781, bands struck up the prophetic notes of "The World Turned Upside Down." After Assembly Republicans firmly established their legislative dominance last week, they brought out a boombox and played the Beatles' "Revolution." Not that we should be identifying "the Republican revolution" with the founding of our republic--or associating GOP Speaker Curt Pringle with Gen.
MAGAZINE
January 28, 1996 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN and DAN BALZ, Adapted from "Storming the Gates: Protest Politics and the Republican Revival," by national political correspondents Ronald Brownstein of The Times and Dan Balz of the Washington Post; published this month by Little, Brown & Co
Steven Spielberg at Spago's on Oscar night would not have generated more of a stir than Newt Gingrich did when he slipped through the door into Grover Norquist's crowded Capitol Hill townhouse precisely at 11 o'clock on the evening of April 7, 1995.
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