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Republican Support

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 2012 | By Jean Merl, Los Angeles Times
If the spectacle of two career Democrats going at it over bragging rights to Republican support seems odd, blame it on California's new election system. The June primary sent the top two vote-getters to the November election, producing several same-party contests in which candidates are vying for voters outside their own party. The competition for that unusual support has reached ferocious proportions in the high-profile clash between seasoned Democratic Reps. Brad Sherman and Howard Berman.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2014 | By Patrick McGreevy and Melanie Mason
SACRAMENTO - The Democrats' loss of a legislative supermajority stifled their push to change California's campaign finance and affirmative action laws Monday, potentially foreshadowing a return to partisan battles over their other priorities, such as property taxes, water policy and a rainy-day fund. Monday's losses come less than two years after Democrats won a historic two-thirds control over both the state Senate and Assembly, eliminating the need for a single Republican vote on any bill.
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NATIONAL
September 16, 2009 | Janet Hook and Peter Nicholas
Senate Democrats' most concerted quest for a bipartisan compromise on healthcare collapsed Tuesday as finance committee Chairman Max Baucus (D-Mont.) announced he would move ahead with his long-delayed proposals without any guarantee of Republican support. Baucus also took a blow from his own party's left, as a senior Senate Democrat declared that too many concessions had been made and that he would not support the emerging bill because it did not include a public insurance option.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 2014 | By Patrick McGreevy and Melanie Mason
SACRAMENTO - An attempt by California lawmakers to curb anonymous political donations, sometimes hidden behind secretive out-of-state groups, will test Democrats' ability to have their way without a supermajority. Dark money, as such contributions are known, roiled California's 2012 election when a web of organizations tied to conservative billionaires Charles and David Koch poured $15 million into the state to fight Gov. Jerry Brown's tax hike and support an ultimately unsuccessful move to curtail unions' political power.
BUSINESS
March 12, 2010 | By Jim Puzzanghera
Congressional attempts to pass the most sweeping overhaul of financial regulations since the Great Depression suffered a potentially devastating blow Thursday as the lead senator working on the legislation vowed to move forward next week without Republican support. With the legislative clock ticking and bipartisan talks stalling, Senate Banking Committee Chairman Christopher J. Dodd (D-Conn.) said he needed to press ahead without the consensus legislation he has been seeking during weeks of intensive negotiations with Republicans.
NATIONAL
January 20, 2010 | By Noam N. Levey and Janet Hook
President Obama and congressional Democrats are rethinking their healthcare strategy in the wake of a Republican victory in the Massachusetts Senate race, giving serious consideration to abandoning the comprehensive approach in favor of incremental steps that might salvage key elements of the package. Now without a filibuster-proof Senate majority, which was lost in the GOP victory, some Democrats believe they could win Republican support for limited changes to the healthcare system, including restrictions on insurance companies and new initiatives to restrain costs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 2010 | By Jack Dolan
Legislative leaders Thursday unveiled a long-promised plan to overhaul state government, the linchpin of which is asking voters to allow a simple majority of lawmakers to pass a budget. Currently, a two-thirds vote is needed, which means some Republican support is required. The new proposal would let Democrats pass spending plans without a single Republican vote under the current makeup of the Legislature. The catch? They need a two-thirds vote -- including some Republicans in both houses -- to put the question to voters in November.
BUSINESS
February 6, 2010 | By Jim Puzzanghera
The Obama administration's attempts to enact the most sweeping overhaul of financial regulations hit another obstacle Friday as Senate Banking Committee Chairman Christopher J. Dodd (D-Conn.) said that talks to craft a bipartisan bill had stalled and that he would draft his own bill. "While I still hope that we will ultimately have a consensus package, it is time to move the process forward," Dodd said. He has been in negotiations with the top Republican on the committee, Sen. Richard Shelby of Alabama, in hopes of drawing GOP support for the overhaul.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 2010 | Patrick McGreevy, Reporting from Sacramento
Central Coast voters go to the polls in a special election Tuesday to fill a vacant seat in the state Senate, and the outcome could affect how difficult it will be for lawmakers to approve a budget this year. The budget crisis in Sacramento has added heat to the contest involving four candidates. Assemblyman Sam Blakeslee (R-San Luis Obispo) is trying to keep the 15th District seat in the hands of the GOP but faces a well-financed campaign by Democrat John Laird, a former assemblyman from Santa Cruz.
NEWS
May 1, 2012 | By Morgan Little
The increasing levels of disdain Americans hold toward government also extends to the Supreme Court, which  according to a new Pew Research Center survey  is at its lowest approval ratings in 25 years. Though a majority of Americans still have a favorable opinion of the Supreme Court, at 52% it's the lowest level of support the court has received since 2007 and 2005, when 57% of Americans favored it.  The latest poll was conducted in the wake of the contentious debate over the constitutionality of President Obama's healthcare revamp, which brings the assumption that the low marks are indicative of a significant drop in support from the left.
NEWS
November 4, 2013 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON -- A gay rights bill appears set to overcome a key Senate hurdle Monday, after a fifth Republican expressed support for the measure to prohibit workplace discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation or gender identity. Sen. Dean Heller (R-Nev.) said Monday that voting for the Employment Non-Discrimination Act "is the right thing to do" and that discrimination "must not be tolerated under any circumstance. " The Senate will hold a procedural vote Monday night on what will be the first major gay rights bill debated in Congress since the vote in 2010 to end the "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" policy barring gays from serving openly in the military.
NATIONAL
June 5, 2013 | By Lisa Mascaro and Brian Bennett, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - The Senate immigration bill is poised to undergo a decidedly rightward shift in an attempt to attract more Republican votes, but that threatens to erode bipartisan consensus. Democratic and Republican authors of the bill have expressed a willingness to make changes and toughen the border security provisions as the sweeping immigration overhaul heads to the floor next week. But a debate has emerged over how much is too much. Leading the effort to engage Republicans is Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.)
NATIONAL
April 10, 2013 | By David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - President Obama, who has seen court nominees run into Republican roadblocks, may have found a winning strategy for putting a judge on the powerful U.S. appeals court here: He chose a highly regarded corporate lawyer whose resume suggests he could have been a Republican nominee. Sri Srinivasan, 46, was a law clerk for two Republican-appointed judges after graduating from Stanford University, and he worked in the George W. Bush Justice Department for five years before joining the Obama team as deputy U.S. solicitor general.
NEWS
March 20, 2013 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON - Conservatives in the House could support an immigration reform plan in line with one proposed by Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.), a key House Republican said Wednesday. Rep. Raul Labrador (R-Idaho), a major player in efforts to develop legislation that could pass the GOP-controlled House, said there should be a pathway to legal status for illegal immigrants already in the country. “There has to be something in my opinion that does not lead to a special pathway to citizenship, but does allow the 11 million people that are here illegally to come out of the shadows and to become legal, and we shouldn't create a second-class group that can never become citizens,” Labrador said at a lunch gathering of House conservatives.
NATIONAL
January 31, 2013 | By Brian Bennett, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - The Democratic-led Senate, in a bid to win support from Republicans, plans a full-fledged debate on immigration reform, a decision that means it could be most of the year before any bill reaches President Obama, who has urged Congress to act in a "timely fashion. " Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) said Thursday the bill would go through the traditional committee process and told senators he would schedule "whatever time you need" on the floor. The move is in stark contrast to how the Senate handled the failed 2007 immigration bill, which was written behind closed doors, circumvented the Judiciary Committee and was rushed to a vote.
NATIONAL
December 21, 2012 | By Lisa Mascaro, Michael A. Memoli and Christi Parsons, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - House Speaker John A. Boehner abruptly canceled a vote on his Plan B tax proposal late Thursday after failing to find enough GOP support, a stunning political defeat that effectively turned resolution of the year-end budget crisis over to President Obama and the Democrats. The speaker had spent the last few weeks negotiating one-on-one with the president, establishing himself as the second-most powerful figure in Washington. But with his strategy imploding, Boehner conceded that he would play a lesser role.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 2011 | By Anthony York and Shane Goldmacher, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from San Francisco and Sacramento -- Gov. Jerry Brown said Thursday he was increasingly skeptical that a tax deal could be struck before the July 1 beginning of the new fiscal year, as Democrats and Republicans heatedly blamed each other for the impasse. Brown, who issued a historic veto of Democrats' budget plan a week ago, told a gathering of about 250 apartment owners and developers in San Francisco that he continues to seek GOP support for his budget plan, which includes a tax referendum in the fall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 2012 | By Jean Merl, Los Angeles Times
If the spectacle of two career Democrats going at it over bragging rights to Republican support seems odd, blame it on California's new election system. The June primary sent the top two vote-getters to the November election, producing several same-party contests in which candidates are vying for voters outside their own party. The competition for that unusual support has reached ferocious proportions in the high-profile clash between seasoned Democratic Reps. Brad Sherman and Howard Berman.
NEWS
May 1, 2012 | By Morgan Little
The increasing levels of disdain Americans hold toward government also extends to the Supreme Court, which  according to a new Pew Research Center survey  is at its lowest approval ratings in 25 years. Though a majority of Americans still have a favorable opinion of the Supreme Court, at 52% it's the lowest level of support the court has received since 2007 and 2005, when 57% of Americans favored it.  The latest poll was conducted in the wake of the contentious debate over the constitutionality of President Obama's healthcare revamp, which brings the assumption that the low marks are indicative of a significant drop in support from the left.
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