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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1995
Republicans comfort the comfortable and afflict the afflicted! APRIL ALLEN EWASKEY Long Beach
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 2014 | By Seema Mehta
Gubernatorial candidate Neel Kashkari, who is trailing badly in the polls, said Sunday that former President George W. Bush, 2012 presidential nominee Mitt Romney and other Republican leaders are aiding his campaign. "A lot of people nationally have been helping," he told reporters after speaking to a Republican women's convention in Orange. "[Former Florida Gov.] Jeb Bush has been helping, [former Indiana Gov.] Mitch Daniels has given a lot of advice on economy policy. "President Bush has been very helpful and made calls and opened doors," Kashkari said.
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NEWS
November 8, 2011 | By Michael A. Memoli
Phil Bryant will succeed Haley Barbour as governor of Mississippi, marking the first time in more than a century the state has replaced one Republican governor with another. Bryant, the lieutenant governor, led Democrat Johnny DuPree 60-40% with more than half of the precincts reporting. Republicans appeared set to claim all but one of the state's constitutional offices; Democrats failed to even mount candidates in three of them. Barbour, the former Republican National Committee chairman who flirted with a presidential bid, was term-limited.
NEWS
April 25, 2014 | Lisa Mascaro, Michael Memoli
WASHINGTON -- A Republican congressman is expected to face charges in a long-running federal investigation into campaign irregularities, but will continue serving in office, his lawyer said Friday. Rep. Michael R. Grimm, a combat Marine and former FBI agent who represents Staten Island and other parts of New York, has been under investigation for more than two years in what his attorney called a "politically motivated vendetta. " "The U.S. Attorney's office has disclosed its intent to file criminal charges against Congressman Grimm," attorney William J. McGinley said in a statement.
NEWS
August 8, 2011 | By Shane Goldmacher, Washington Bureau
Republicans immediately pounced on President Obama's speech Monday as insufficient after the nation's credit rating was downgraded for the first time in history last week. In his remarks, the president declared that America remains a "triple-A country" and that the downgrade by Standard & Poor's would hopefully “give us a renewed sense of urgency" to tackle the nation's fiscal troubles. But with the Dow Jones industrial average plunging more than 500 points after Obama's address, the head of the Republican National Committee said the markets had already spoken.
OPINION
October 1, 2013
Re "Phone call a shift in tone for U.S., Iran," Sept. 28 As the historic personal phone contact between our Nobel Peace Prize-winning president and the newly elected Iranian president reduces tensions between our two countries and offers a glimmer of hope for resolution of the nuclear issue (not to mention peace and understanding), Republican leaders like House Majority Leader Eric Cantor can do nothing but blast President Obama for what he didn't accomplish. This constant negativity is getting tiresome and raises the question of whether Republicans have the vision and capacity to be anything but an opposition party.
OPINION
December 1, 2012
Re "Obama takes fight to social media," Nov. 29 Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) once said that his most important job was to make Barack Obama a one-term president. He failed. Now, with the fiscal cliff ahead, perhaps he can accomplish something for the second most important thing to him: the American people. R. J. Cimiluca Los Angeles ALSO: Letters: A cop's reality Letters on letters: No room for the Nativity Letters: Pension reform without an election
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2014 | By Chris Megerian
SACRAMENTO - Gov. Jerry Brown has both Democrats and Republicans on board with the broad outlines of his plan for stockpiling some cash and paying off debt. But as the special legislative session Brown called on the issue opened Thursday, it was clear that, as lawmakers like to say, the devil could be in the details. Republicans, whose votes the Democratic governor needs to place his measure on the fall ballot, want tighter controls on the reserve fund than the governor has proposed.
NEWS
April 23, 2014 | By David Lauter
WASHINGTON - Three lessons jump out from the latest round of polling on key U.S. Senate races. First, just as Democrats have been saying, their endangered incumbent in Arkansas, Sen. Mark Pryor, is doing better than analysts in Washington had believed. By 47% to 38%, registered voters in Arkansas approved of Pryor's work in office, with only 14% unable or unwilling to give an opinion, according to a new poll by the New York Times and the Kaiser Family Foundation. By 46% to 36%, Pryor led his Republican opponent, Rep. Tom Cotton, a former Army captain who served in Iraq and Afghanistan and has been a rising conservative star since winning a seat in the House in 2012.
NATIONAL
April 21, 2014 | By Timothy M. Phelps
WASHINGTON - For decades the Republican Party prided itself for being tough on crime, often putting Democrats on the defensive by pushing for longer, mandatory sentences for convicts. In 1988, that hard-line stance helped sink the presidential dreams of then-Massachusetts Gov. Michael Dukakis, who was blamed in Republican TV ads for having released convicted killer Willie Horton as part of a weekend furlough program. (Horton failed to return after a furlough and went on to commit robbery and rape.)
OPINION
April 20, 2014
Re "Hate without end," Opinion, April 17 The groups named by Peter Gottschalk as being responsible for widespread hate in this century are "right-wing politicians, conservative donors and professional Islamophobes. " He does not have to come right out and say "Republicans" because people have been primed by the media to associate these words with the GOP. Gottschalk gives a history of the Ku Klux Klan. He omits the fact that the Republican Party since the time of Abraham Lincoln has championed civil rights, while the Democratic Party prior to the 1960s - when it was forced to accept civil rights - has a dismal history in comparison.
OPINION
April 15, 2014 | Doyle McManus
Is Jeb Bush's moment over? Not in his mind. The former governor of Florida says he's considering a campaign to become his family's third president, even though he dreads "getting back into the vortex of the mud fight. " But as enticing as it is for the Republican establishment to contemplate the prospect of an unexpected comeback, an epic series of primary battles and a cinematic rematch between the Clinton and Bush dynasties, it's not all that likely. The Republican Party has changed dramatically since 2002, the last year Jeb Bush ran for office, and not in ways that would aid his candidacy.
OPINION
April 15, 2014 | By Lanhee J. Chen
The recent defeat of an effort to reinstitute affirmative action in admissions to California's public colleges and universities demonstrates the political power of Asian American voters and challenges the conventional wisdom about their partisan loyalties. The defeat is a reminder that Asian Americans can have a decisive impact on political and policymaking processes. Perhaps more important, it suggests that if education is a key issue that drives Asian American voters, the Democratic Party may not be able to reliably count on their support in the future.
NEWS
April 10, 2014 | By Scott Martelle
So what can we read into a name? Republican members of Congress, in search of yet another way to honor the man who led them back from the wilderness after the Nixon White House debacle, are trying to rename a mountain after Ronald Reagan. In Nevada. Which, by definition, means out in the middle of a desert , though in this case it has a nice view of Las Vegas. And it's not even like they're trying to name a whole mountain after him. They have their eyes set on a peak that's part of Frenchman Mountain . Which means, technically speaking, Reagan will be secondary to a European.
NEWS
April 9, 2014 | By Lisa Mascaro, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
WASHINGTON - With sought-after women voters at stake, Senate Republicans blocked election-year legislation Wednesday aimed at ensuring that female workers receive equal pay for doing the same work as men. A high-profile campaign for the Paycheck Fairness Act, orchestrated by the Democratic-controlled Senate and the White House, did little to motivate Republicans in a mid-term election year when both parties are seeking women voters. Republican senators blocked the bill on a party-line filibuster, 53-44, with many waging a protest vote over party leaders' refusal to allow amendments.
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