Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsResearch California
IN THE NEWS

Research California

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 22, 1990 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Determined to avoid the problems that robbed California of other major scientific projects in recent years, scientists throughout the state have united in an effort to win the chance to design the world's most powerful fusion reactor and demonstrate the viability of harnessing the fuel that powers the sun. The scientists, who will present their proposal in Washington this week, are involved in a joint effort by the United States, Japan, the Soviet Union and Europe.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 1999 | AMY PYLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A third of California's Latinas--and up to 39% in Los Angeles County--lack health insurance, leading fewer of them to seek preventive health care and contributing to sometimes lethal consequences, according to a state study released Wednesday. The report by the Latino Coalition for a Healthy California also found that among ethnic groups of women, Latinas were by far the least likely to have insurance. In all, nearly 1.5 million lack either public or private coverage.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 1999 | AMY PYLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A third of California's Latinas--and up to 39% in Los Angeles County--lack health insurance, leading fewer of them to seek preventive health care and contributing to sometimes lethal consequences, according to a state study released Wednesday. The report by the Latino Coalition for a Healthy California also found that among ethnic groups of women, Latinas were by far the least likely to have insurance. In all, nearly 1.5 million lack either public or private coverage.
NEWS
September 15, 1997 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sounding an alarm about heavy immigration, a new study warns that an increasingly skill-based California economy cannot continue to absorb large flows of poorly educated immigrants--who in turn pose a growing strain on public services while driving U.S.-born workers out of the state. The study by Rand Corp., the Santa Monica-based think tank, provides a sweeping analysis of immigration into California during the past 30 years and offers several provocative recommendations.
NEWS
September 15, 1997 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sounding an alarm about heavy immigration, a new study warns that an increasingly skill-based California economy cannot continue to absorb large flows of poorly educated immigrants--who in turn pose a growing strain on public services while driving U.S.-born workers out of the state. The study by Rand Corp., the Santa Monica-based think tank, provides a sweeping analysis of immigration into California during the past 30 years and offers several provocative recommendations.
NEWS
January 11, 1998 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four children whose fabulously wealthy father allegedly picked their teenage mothers up in Pacific Rim honky-tonks will inherit as much as 60% of his estate--valued at $400 million to $600 million--under an agreement recently approved by a Saipan court. A key part of the bitter international legal brawl over the fortune of Larry Lee Hillblom, founder of the DHL Corp. courier service, ended quietly in a Seattle laboratory, where genetic testing revealed that the children had the same father.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2008 | Myron Levin, Times Staff Writer
As California joins five other states in requiring drivers to use hands-free devices when talking on cellphones, an increasing body of research suggests the legislation will accomplish little. The risk doesn't stem from whether one or both hands are on the wheel, the research suggests. It's whether the driver's mind is somewhere else. The biggest danger is "cognitive capture" -- or being blind to driving cues because one is absorbed in conversations, especially emotional ones.
NEWS
January 21, 1993
Members of the Beverly Hills Firemen's Assn. will present $6,200 to the Alisa Ann Ruch Burn Foundation, which provides programs for burn victims, burn prevention education and burn care research throughout California. The presentation will be today at 10 a.m. at Fire Department Headquarters, 445 N. Rexford Drive. The firefighters collected the funds during their annual holiday drive .
NEWS
September 2, 1989 | Clipboard researched by Dallas M. Jackson and Rick VanderKnyff / Los Angeles Times, Graphics by Doris Shields / Los Angeles Times
Union Percentage Civilian Percentage Year Members Change Labor Force Change 1987 149,800 6.8 1,319,000 -0.7 1985 140,200 12.2 1,328,600 8.0 1983 125,000 -5.5 1,230,000 13.3 1981 132,300 19.6 1,085,800 5.4 1979 110,600 -- 1,030,500 -- Source: California Department of Industrial Relations, Division of Labor Research & Statistics; California Employment Development Department
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1996
Charlene Ohlrich of Port Hueneme received a program officer appointment to the California Endowment, a new foundation for health-care philanthropy. Ohlrich, a registered nurse with an extensive background in health care, was one of 10 regional program officers selected. Ohlrich will assume responsibility for the counties of San Joaquin, Stanislaus, Tuolumne, Mono, Mariposa, Merced, Madera, Fresno, Kings, Tulare and Inyo.
NEWS
August 22, 1990 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Determined to avoid the problems that robbed California of other major scientific projects in recent years, scientists throughout the state have united in an effort to win the chance to design the world's most powerful fusion reactor and demonstrate the viability of harnessing the fuel that powers the sun. The scientists, who will present their proposal in Washington this week, are involved in a joint effort by the United States, Japan, the Soviet Union and Europe.
OPINION
December 30, 1990
During the 1980's, the numbers of students in California public schools who speak and write little English more than doubled. Three-fourths of these students speak Spanish. The growth of students needing help because of their English skills may slow over the next 10 years, but the critical shortage of trained bilingual teachers is likely to persist. Source: Compiled from Assembly Office of Research and California Department of Education data.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|