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BUSINESS
March 27, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
GM Sets Up R&D Institute: General Motors Corp. announced that it has established an automotive research and development institute at Beijing's Qinghuza University, the top engineering school in China. GM is contributing $118,900 to set up the program, the Delphi Automotive Systems Technology Institute, which will assist with product development as well as train Chinese students in auto technology.
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BUSINESS
March 27, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
GM Sets Up R&D Institute: General Motors Corp. announced that it has established an automotive research and development institute at Beijing's Qinghuza University, the top engineering school in China. GM is contributing $118,900 to set up the program, the Delphi Automotive Systems Technology Institute, which will assist with product development as well as train Chinese students in auto technology.
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BUSINESS
February 12, 2006 | Evelyn Iritani, Times Staff Writer
President Bush's recent call for more visas for skilled foreign workers increases the likelihood that relief is on the way for U.S. technology firms that say they are struggling to fill key positions. In a Feb. 2 speech at the Minnesota headquarters of 3M, the president said it was a "mistake not to encourage more really bright folks who can fill the jobs that are having trouble being filled here in America."
NEWS
August 29, 2000 | CHING-CHING NI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Night falls. Headlights blaze. Hundreds of Tibetan antelopes, many of them pregnant, gallop toward the deathtrap. Shots echo. Animals shriek. Dust turns pink. The poachers drive off. A skinned antelope wakes up dripping blood, scurries a few steps, collapses. Next day. Baby antelopes cling to life, nursing on the cold breasts of mothers killed for their fur. This is the ritual that fuels the lucrative trade in shahtoosh shawls and scarves sold illegally in the West. This is the memory that turns a ragtag army of husky Tibetan men into weeping storytellers.
NEWS
August 29, 2000 | CHING-CHING NI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Night falls. Headlights blaze. Hundreds of Tibetan antelopes, many of them pregnant, gallop toward the deathtrap. Shots echo. Animals shriek. Dust turns pink. The poachers drive off. A skinned antelope wakes up dripping blood, scurries a few steps, collapses. Next day. Baby antelopes cling to life, nursing on the cold breasts of mothers killed for their fur. This is the ritual that fuels the lucrative trade in shahtoosh shawls and scarves sold illegally in the West.
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