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NEWS
May 14, 2000 | PETER G. GOSSELIN and PAUL JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
When the history of the just-dawning genetic revolution is finally written, a clunky-looking machine the size of a sidewalk trash can will play a starring role. The automated DNA sequencer is letting researchers quickly crack the biochemical code of life, an achievement that could one day turn incurable diseases into treatable ones. But the machine is at the vortex of a struggle over wealth, fame and, quite possibly, control of the genetic code itself.
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NEWS
May 14, 2000 | PETER G. GOSSELIN and PAUL JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
When the history of the just-dawning genetic revolution is finally written, a clunky-looking machine the size of a sidewalk trash can will play a starring role. The automated DNA sequencer is letting researchers quickly crack the biochemical code of life, an achievement that could one day turn incurable diseases into treatable ones. But the machine is at the vortex of a struggle over wealth, fame and, quite possibly, control of the genetic code itself.
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NEWS
October 31, 1992 | From Associated Press
Federal officials have agreed to boost reimbursement for Stanford University's research costs despite a relationship that soured when the university was accused of overcharging the government, officials said. University President Gerhard Casper said the government has agreed to a provisional reimbursement rate of 60.3% of costs, up from 55.5%. "It's no reason to be jubilant, but it's progress," Casper said at a faculty meeting Thursday.
NEWS
May 15, 1999 | TERENCE MONMANEY, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
U.S. officials, who on Monday halted clinical research at the Duke University Medical Center, lifted the suspension Friday in response to the prestigious teaching hospital's extensive new plans to strengthen safeguards for people in studies. The action, which reinstates the medical center's license to do federally funded studies on people, allows Duke researchers to go back to work on most of the 2,000 projects that the abrupt ban threw into turmoil.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1988
The research and treatment-coordination efforts of the only full-range sickle-cell treatment center in the Los Angeles area are being sharply reduced by a federal decision to cut off funding, the center's director said Monday. "There will be a marked cutback," Dr. L. Julian Haywood said. "Some of our people are already starting to look for other jobs."
NEWS
August 9, 1989
Health and Human Services Secretary Louis W. Sullivan announced new federal rules for handling reports of scientific fraud, saying that medical treatment cannot be jeopardized by shortcuts. Under regulations published in the Federal Register, all colleges, universities and other institutions receiving Public Health Service money for biomedical or behavioral research must develop policies to deal with allegations of scientific fraud and misconduct.
NEWS
July 28, 1989
The Senate agreed to release the first federal construction funds for a $4.4-billion atom smasher, which Texans are counting on to bring jobs and revenues and which scientists hope will solve a few mysteries of the universe. The spending bill containing the funds provides $135 million to begin construction of the superconducting super collider in Waxahachie, Tex., and $90 million for research and development.
NEWS
September 24, 1987
The City of Hope National Medical Center in Duarte received a $2-million grant from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases as part of a $10-million federal grant package to spur AIDS research around the country. The federal Department of Health and Human Services said the money will fund 11 new research groups under a program that began last year. Funding of all groups is expected to reach $68 million between 1987 and 1992.
NEWS
February 5, 1991 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Stanford University has released a voluminous report attempting to rebut allegations that the school overcharged the federal government as much as $50 million in research-related funds to support campus libraries. The Stanford defense is the latest step in a spending controversy in which the government may challenge as much as $200 million in federal payments to the prestigious university over the past decade.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 1998 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vice President Gore will announce at the White House today that USC and UCLA will join seven other research centers in receiving federal grants to study environmental health threats facing children, administration officials said. The Centers of Excellence in Children's Environmental Health Research will address two primary areas--the causes of asthma and the effects of pesticide exposure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 1998 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vice President Gore will announce at the White House today that USC and UCLA will join seven other research centers in receiving federal grants to study environmental health threats facing children, administration officials said. The Centers of Excellence in Children's Environmental Health Research will address two primary areas--the causes of asthma and the effects of pesticide exposure.
NEWS
February 2, 1995 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the nation's largest nuclear weapons laboratory with more than 8,000 employees, should get out of the business of designing warheads, a national commission said Wednesday. The panel, chaired by former Motorola Chairman Robert Galvin, recommended consolidating design work for future nuclear weapons at a single location: Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico, the nation's other major weapons lab.
NEWS
October 21, 1993 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ and LIANNE HART, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In the beginning, the superconducting super collider was a 4 1/2-pound blue book that cost $60 million to produce. For physicists, that 712-page proposal was a riveting text that envisioned a machine to reveal the origin of matter. Among the small-town politicians and congressmen who saw in its dry technical specifications a more earthly promise of 15,000 local jobs, it became an instant bestseller.
NEWS
October 31, 1992 | From Associated Press
Federal officials have agreed to boost reimbursement for Stanford University's research costs despite a relationship that soured when the university was accused of overcharging the government, officials said. University President Gerhard Casper said the government has agreed to a provisional reimbursement rate of 60.3% of costs, up from 55.5%. "It's no reason to be jubilant, but it's progress," Casper said at a faculty meeting Thursday.
NEWS
February 5, 1991 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Stanford University has released a voluminous report attempting to rebut allegations that the school overcharged the federal government as much as $50 million in research-related funds to support campus libraries. The Stanford defense is the latest step in a spending controversy in which the government may challenge as much as $200 million in federal payments to the prestigious university over the past decade.
NEWS
August 9, 1989
Health and Human Services Secretary Louis W. Sullivan announced new federal rules for handling reports of scientific fraud, saying that medical treatment cannot be jeopardized by shortcuts. Under regulations published in the Federal Register, all colleges, universities and other institutions receiving Public Health Service money for biomedical or behavioral research must develop policies to deal with allegations of scientific fraud and misconduct.
NEWS
February 2, 1995 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the nation's largest nuclear weapons laboratory with more than 8,000 employees, should get out of the business of designing warheads, a national commission said Wednesday. The panel, chaired by former Motorola Chairman Robert Galvin, recommended consolidating design work for future nuclear weapons at a single location: Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico, the nation's other major weapons lab.
NEWS
July 28, 1989
The Senate agreed to release the first federal construction funds for a $4.4-billion atom smasher, which Texans are counting on to bring jobs and revenues and which scientists hope will solve a few mysteries of the universe. The spending bill containing the funds provides $135 million to begin construction of the superconducting super collider in Waxahachie, Tex., and $90 million for research and development.
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