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February 9, 1992 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
A prominent California congressman called Saturday for a massive restructuring of the Department of Energy's major research laboratories, including the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Northern California. George E. Brown Jr. (D-Colton), chairman of the House Committee on Space, Science and Technology, said that all of Livermore's research on nuclear weaponry and the Strategic Defense Initiative should be transferred to the Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico.
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NEWS
February 9, 1992 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
A prominent California congressman called Saturday for a massive restructuring of the Department of Energy's major research laboratories, including the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Northern California. George E. Brown Jr. (D-Colton), chairman of the House Committee on Space, Science and Technology, said that all of Livermore's research on nuclear weaponry and the Strategic Defense Initiative should be transferred to the Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 1992 | ROBERT COOKE, Cooke is a science writer for Newsday in New York. A portion of this story was contributed by Donald J. Frederick, a reporter and writer for National Geographic News Service
Although statesman and technical tinkerer Benjamin Franklin usually gets credit as the nation's first real scientist, a new archeological dig on a sandy island off North Carolina has found a research laboratory dating to the 1580s, about 200 years before Franklin ever went out to fly his wet kite. "We've found the birthplace of American science," said Ivor Noel Hume, director of the dig at Roanoke Island's Ft. Raleigh National Historical Site.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 1992 | ROBERT COOKE, Cooke is a science writer for Newsday in New York. A portion of this story was contributed by Donald J. Frederick, a reporter and writer for National Geographic News Service
Although statesman and technical tinkerer Benjamin Franklin usually gets credit as the nation's first real scientist, a new archeological dig on a sandy island off North Carolina has found a research laboratory dating to the 1580s, about 200 years before Franklin ever went out to fly his wet kite. "We've found the birthplace of American science," said Ivor Noel Hume, director of the dig at Roanoke Island's Ft. Raleigh National Historical Site.
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