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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 2000 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles City Council on Tuesday imposed restrictions on funding cityhood studies for the San Fernando Valley and Harbor areas, sparking calls by secessionist leaders to reject the city's money. Richard Close, chairman of Valley VOTE, said his secession group will ask the Local Agency Formation Commission to reject the city's $265,000 as long as the conditions stand. The city would contribute 10% of the study's cost.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 2000 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles City Council on Tuesday imposed restrictions on funding cityhood studies for the San Fernando Valley and Harbor areas, sparking calls by secessionist leaders to reject the city's money. Richard Close, chairman of Valley VOTE, said his secession group will ask the Local Agency Formation Commission to reject the city's $265,000 as long as the conditions stand. The city would contribute 10% of the study's cost.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 1997 | JEAN O. PASCO
The county is poised to join the state Water Resources Board and the Coastal Commission for a two-year, $500,000 study of the Newport Bay watershed. County supervisors are expected to approve the second of two grants today, with most of the money coming from the state water board.
BUSINESS
August 24, 1999 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
An investment group led by Warren Lichtenstein acquired a 9.7% stake in Sync Research Inc. and said it may decide to propose a sale of all or a portion of the Irvine network-software company if its shares remain undervalued. The investors spent $710,437 to buy 339,822 shares of Sync from July 19 to Aug. 19, according to a report filed this month with the Securities and Exchange Commission. The group paid $2 to $2.28 a share, the filing said. Lichtenstein could not be reached for comment Monday.
NEWS
October 13, 1995 | HUGH POPE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There, far below, are the tightly packed, flat-roofed houses. Swoop down and an entrance can be found--a hole pierced through the ceiling of one home. Clamber down a ladder and, suddenly, a room comes into view. Along the walls, there are benches lined with cattle horns. The columns are decorated with bulls' heads. In a central spot, positioned like a shrine, rests a molded relief that may represent the bosomy Anatolian "Mother Goddess."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 1999
Reaching across the city, council members backing cityhood studies for the San Fernando Valley and the harbor area joined forces Tuesday to formally request that the city identify funds to help pay for the work. Councilmen Joel Wachs of Studio City and Rudy Svorinich Jr. of San Pedro moved that city officials report on the cost of potential studies of secession for the Valley, harbor, Eastside and Westside, and report on potential funding sources.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1999 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to help the city, county and state pay for a study of San Fernando Valley secession, U.S. Reps. Brad Sherman and Howard "Buck" McKeon on Thursday asked Congress to commit $2 million toward the analysis. In a letter to the House Subcommittee on Veterans Affairs, the Department of Housing and Urban Development and Independent Agencies, Sherman (D-Sherman Oaks) and McKeon (R-Santa Clarita) argued that a study on the ramifications of breaking up Los Angeles could benefit the entire nation.
NEWS
June 8, 1993 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
In a perfect scientific world, Joan Sabate never would have limited his work to walnuts. The 38-year-old Loma Linda University researcher had a hypothesis: that a diet high in nuts but low in other fats could cut cholesterol. But to prove it, he would need money. He contemplated applying for a grant with the National Institutes of Health, but figured he would be turned down. And he did not want to wait for the lumbering federal bureaucracy to make a decision. So he shopped his idea around.
BUSINESS
August 24, 1999 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
An investment group led by Warren Lichtenstein acquired a 9.7% stake in Sync Research Inc. and said it may decide to propose a sale of all or a portion of the Irvine network-software company if its shares remain undervalued. The investors spent $710,437 to buy 339,822 shares of Sync from July 19 to Aug. 19, according to a report filed this month with the Securities and Exchange Commission. The group paid $2 to $2.28 a share, the filing said. Lichtenstein could not be reached for comment Monday.
NEWS
February 12, 1993 | BETTY GOODWIN
The Scene: The Los Angeles premiere Wednesday of Miramax's "Strictly Ballroom," the Australian dance/romance comedy, at the Hollywood Galaxy Theater followed by a retro disco at the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel. The event, co-hosted by Detour magazine, benefited American Foundation for AIDS Research. Finances: Tickets were free ("Invitations just arrive on my desk all the time," noted a callow William Morris agent), but it was pay-your-way popcorn and parking. Donations were voluntary.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1999 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to help the city, county and state pay for a study of San Fernando Valley secession, U.S. Reps. Brad Sherman and Howard "Buck" McKeon on Thursday asked Congress to commit $2 million toward the analysis. In a letter to the House Subcommittee on Veterans Affairs, the Department of Housing and Urban Development and Independent Agencies, Sherman (D-Sherman Oaks) and McKeon (R-Santa Clarita) argued that a study on the ramifications of breaking up Los Angeles could benefit the entire nation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 1999
Reaching across the city, council members backing cityhood studies for the San Fernando Valley and the harbor area joined forces Tuesday to formally request that the city identify funds to help pay for the work. Councilmen Joel Wachs of Studio City and Rudy Svorinich Jr. of San Pedro moved that city officials report on the cost of potential studies of secession for the Valley, harbor, Eastside and Westside, and report on potential funding sources.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 1997 | JEAN O. PASCO
The county is poised to join the state Water Resources Board and the Coastal Commission for a two-year, $500,000 study of the Newport Bay watershed. County supervisors are expected to approve the second of two grants today, with most of the money coming from the state water board.
NEWS
October 13, 1995 | HUGH POPE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There, far below, are the tightly packed, flat-roofed houses. Swoop down and an entrance can be found--a hole pierced through the ceiling of one home. Clamber down a ladder and, suddenly, a room comes into view. Along the walls, there are benches lined with cattle horns. The columns are decorated with bulls' heads. In a central spot, positioned like a shrine, rests a molded relief that may represent the bosomy Anatolian "Mother Goddess."
NEWS
June 8, 1993 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
In a perfect scientific world, Joan Sabate never would have limited his work to walnuts. The 38-year-old Loma Linda University researcher had a hypothesis: that a diet high in nuts but low in other fats could cut cholesterol. But to prove it, he would need money. He contemplated applying for a grant with the National Institutes of Health, but figured he would be turned down. And he did not want to wait for the lumbering federal bureaucracy to make a decision. So he shopped his idea around.
NEWS
May 28, 1994 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
The big brown building, a short walk off a country road in this scenic college town, looks more like a barn than a high-tech university laboratory. Inside, a rare and curious contraption is engaged in a habit that the surgeon general warns is bad for your health. This is Kent Pinkerton's creation: the UC Davis smoking machine. As an associate professor of anatomy at Davis, Pinkerton is interested in how the lungs work. His specialty has landed him at the crossroads of politics and medicine.
BUSINESS
November 1, 1999 | THOMAS S. MULLIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Can the kind of out-of-the-box thinking that spawned the Internet one day help our spies do better snooping? Betting that it can, the CIA has founded a venture-capital firm to seek out and nurture entrepreneurs whose ideas might lead to breakthroughs in intelligence gathering--and perhaps some nifty commercial products along the way. The new firm--a private, nonprofit corporation called In-Q-It--has been operating for a month in Washington and plans to open an office in Silicon Valley.
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