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Research Institute For Housing America

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BUSINESS
November 18, 1998 | Associated Press
The Mortgage Bankers Assn. has established an independent research organization designed to improve access to home loans for minorities and low-income people. "It's not only good public policy, it's good business," Donald Lange, president of the bankers group, said. The new organization, called the Research Institute for Housing America, will work with academic experts, regulators, consumer and community groups and the mortgage banking industry to pursue research on fair lending.
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BUSINESS
November 18, 1998 | Associated Press
The Mortgage Bankers Assn. has established an independent research organization designed to improve access to home loans for minorities and low-income people. "It's not only good public policy, it's good business," Donald Lange, president of the bankers group, said. The new organization, called the Research Institute for Housing America, will work with academic experts, regulators, consumer and community groups and the mortgage banking industry to pursue research on fair lending.
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BUSINESS
January 1, 2012 | By Kenneth R. Harney
Where do you side in the great real estate buy-sell divide of 2012? If you're a homeowner considering selling sometime in the new year, are you apprehensive that you won't get the price you need or want, and therefore it's possible you won't even try to sell? If you're a buyer, do you agree that with 30-year fixed mortgage rates now below 4% and home prices near cyclical bottom in many areas, 2012 offers extraordinary opportunities, even if listings are fewer than you might prefer?
BUSINESS
January 6, 2011 | By Alejandro Lazo, Los Angeles Times
In the Inland Empire and other former home-building hot spots, the housing bust has created a new kind of declining city, different from the nation's traditional rusting centers of industry, that could languish for years. Although the causes of the decline in these metropolitan areas are distinct from the loss of employment from shrinking manufacturing and industry in some of the nation's old industrial powerhouses, these areas could experience fates similar to places such as Cleveland and Detroit, with neighborhoods experiencing high rates of vacancies for a very long time, according to a study to be released Thursday.
TRAVEL
June 22, 2008 | Christopher Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
The visionary in Fort Bragg, Calif., who ordered up a living room large enough to accommodate a rugby match. The risk taker in Idyllwild, Calif., who one day must have said, "Hey, what about a round house?" The fearless renovator in Santa Fe, N.M., who asked, "Why just one kitchen?" I've never met these people, but you could say that I've slept with them -- under their roofs, that is, in beds they bought. I know them, dear readers.
OPINION
January 28, 2007 | Joel Kotkin, Joel Kotkin, an Irvine fellow at the New America Foundation, is the author of "The City: A Global History" (Modern Library Paperback).
FOR THE LAST five years, speculators, big developers and homeowners have gorged on Los Angeles real estate. The huge run-up in prices -- more than 135% from 2001 to 2006 -- has greatly increased the spending power of property owners. Yet there has been a worrisome consequence: Working and middle-class families are moving out -- and failing to move in -- because they cannot afford a house here. Long term, that's not good for the local economy. As perverse as it sounds, what L.A.
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