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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 1996 | From Times staff and wire reports
Dark matter, the mysterious stuff that scientists think makes up most of the universe but which has never been seen, comes in different shapes and sizes, according to Japanese astronomers. Yasushi Ikebe of the University of Tokyo and colleagues reported in Nature that they used Japan's Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics to measure X-ray emissions from gases in the Formax cluster of galaxies, relatively near to the Earth.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SCIENCE
October 5, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
Reaching a long-sought milestone, Japanese researchers have demonstrated in mice that eggs and sperm can be grown from stem cells and combined to produce healthy offspring, pointing to new treatments for infertility. If the achievement can be repeated in humans - and experts said they are optimistic that such efforts will ultimately succeed - the technique could make it easier for women in their 30s or 40s to become mothers. It could also help men and women whose reproductive organs have been damaged by cancer treatments or other causes.
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NEWS
May 7, 1996 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japanese and American science officials have agreed on a new earthquake research partnership between the two countries, significantly expanding two 20-year-old science pacts. One of the earliest projects of the Earthquake Disaster Mitigation Partnership will be a Japanese-financed but jointly designed shake table in Japan that will be the world's largest to date.
NEWS
December 9, 1998 | Associated Press
Japanese researchers report that they have cloned eight genetically identical calves using cells removed from one adult cow. In a study to be published this week in the journal Science, the researchers report that the calves were cloned with techniques similar to those used to clone the famed Scottish sheep known as Dolly. The Japanese said they transferred the nuclei from cells removed from an adult animal into cow eggs from which the nuclei had been removed.
NEWS
December 9, 1998 | Associated Press
Japanese researchers report that they have cloned eight genetically identical calves using cells removed from one adult cow. In a study to be published this week in the journal Science, the researchers report that the calves were cloned with techniques similar to those used to clone the famed Scottish sheep known as Dolly. The Japanese said they transferred the nuclei from cells removed from an adult animal into cow eggs from which the nuclei had been removed.
NEWS
June 4, 1987 | DENISE HAMILTON, Times Staff Writer
Imagine receiving $11,000 to hang out with Japanese motorcycle gangs that look like they roared out of "American Graffiti," then jetting to London to mingle with punk rockers. Occidental College senior Peter Hong did imagine that, and now he's about to see his fantasy come true, thanks to a Thomas J. Watson Fellowship. Established in 1968 to honor the late founder of IBM, the fellowships finance research and travel abroad for 80 seniors each year.
SCIENCE
October 5, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
Reaching a long-sought milestone, Japanese researchers have demonstrated in mice that eggs and sperm can be grown from stem cells and combined to produce healthy offspring, pointing to new treatments for infertility. If the achievement can be repeated in humans - and experts said they are optimistic that such efforts will ultimately succeed - the technique could make it easier for women in their 30s or 40s to become mothers. It could also help men and women whose reproductive organs have been damaged by cancer treatments or other causes.
NEWS
May 6, 1993
Scott C. Littleton of Pasadena received a Fulbright Senior Scholar grant of $30,000 to do research in Japan on a Shinto shrine in Tokyo and prepare a manuscript for a book. Littleton is chairman of the sociology and anthropology department at Occidental College.
BUSINESS
December 5, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Japan Plans Huge International Research Effort: Japan will launch a $200-million, 10-year international research project to develop new computer chips, other electronic devices, biotechnology and new materials. The government will finance the project, but Japanese, U.S., European and other private corporations will join in the work. Development of 16-gigabit, dynamic random-access-memory microchips using atom and molecular-manipulating technology will be among the research programs.
NEWS
April 7, 1988
President Reagan informed Congress that he is denying a Japanese request to resume fishing in U.S. waters because of continued Japanese whaling. Reagan said the Commerce Department has certified violations of an international whale conservation program based on permits Japan issued for the killing of Southern Hemisphere minke whales for research purposes. Japan's current fishing quota in the 200-mile offshore zone is zero.
NEWS
May 7, 1996 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japanese and American science officials have agreed on a new earthquake research partnership between the two countries, significantly expanding two 20-year-old science pacts. One of the earliest projects of the Earthquake Disaster Mitigation Partnership will be a Japanese-financed but jointly designed shake table in Japan that will be the world's largest to date.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 1996 | From Times staff and wire reports
Dark matter, the mysterious stuff that scientists think makes up most of the universe but which has never been seen, comes in different shapes and sizes, according to Japanese astronomers. Yasushi Ikebe of the University of Tokyo and colleagues reported in Nature that they used Japan's Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics to measure X-ray emissions from gases in the Formax cluster of galaxies, relatively near to the Earth.
NEWS
June 4, 1987 | DENISE HAMILTON, Times Staff Writer
Imagine receiving $11,000 to hang out with Japanese motorcycle gangs that look like they roared out of "American Graffiti," then jetting to London to mingle with punk rockers. Occidental College senior Peter Hong did imagine that, and now he's about to see his fantasy come true, thanks to a Thomas J. Watson Fellowship. Established in 1968 to honor the late founder of IBM, the fellowships finance research and travel abroad for 80 seniors each year.
NEWS
December 7, 1991
David T. Imagawa, 69, internationally recognized immunologist and virologist who helped develop the measles vaccine and did research on AIDS. A native of Isleton, Calif., Imagawa was interned in a camp for Japanese-Americans during World War II. He earned his doctorate in bacteriology at the University of Minnesota and did research at Japan National Institute. His 1989 lead article in the New England Journal of Medicine provided insight into how the human immunodeficiency virus causes AIDS.
WORLD
June 30, 2002 | Associated Press
A fleet of Japanese whalers set out Saturday for a three-month hunt in the northwest Pacific where they will kill endangered sei whales for the first time in more than 25 years. The five vessels plan to catch 260 whales--150 minke, 50 Bryde's, 50 sei and 10 sperm whales, the Fisheries Agency said. Sei whales have not been taken since their near-extinction led nations to halt commercial hunts of the species 26 years ago.
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