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Research Medical

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BUSINESS
December 5, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Baxter International Inc. said it agreed to acquire Research Medical Inc. in a stock swap valued at about $236 million. Salt Lake City-based Research Medical makes disposable products for cardiovascular and vascular surgery, and specialty pharmaceuticals. It had revenue of $40 million last year. The agreement values Research Medical at $23.50 a share. Its shares rose $2.77 to $22.77 on the Nasdaq Stock Market.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
April 2, 2013 | By Jessica Wapner
It would be fair to say that Patient 5 owes his life to medical research. Also known as David Aponte, he was the headlining success story from a recent clinical trial at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. The trial tested a new approach - in which a portion of the immune system is genetically altered and then reintroduced to the body - for treating an otherwise fatal leukemia. But when we celebrate the remarkable achievement made possible by the doctors behind the experimental treatment and the patients who volunteered themselves for research, there are two other guests of honor to include at the party: years and years of basic science, and the public dollars that funded them.
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NEWS
October 3, 1995 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
A new study of chimpanzees, the species evolutionarily closest to humans, has provided what scientists are calling the first definitive proof that a high salt intake causes high blood pressure and is thus a risk factor in coronary disease. Although physicians have suspected such a link for centuries, so far the evidence has been indirect, consisting primarily of epidemiological studies in humans and physiological studies in rodents.
OPINION
January 25, 2013
For a muscular agency that combats vicious drug criminals, the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration acts like a terrified and obstinate toddler when it comes to basic science. For years, the DEA and the National Institute for Drug Abuse have made it all but impossible to develop a robust body of research on the medical uses of marijuana. A pro-marijuana group lost its legal battle this week when a federal appellate court ruled that marijuana would remain a Schedule I drug, defined as having no accepted medical value and a high potential for abuse.
NEWS
December 14, 1999 | From Associated Press
Dr. Karl Shipman merely broke his wrist, but it killed him. Bacteria set in during surgery to set his wrist, and a staph infection ultimately raged through his body. The Denver physician's fellow doctors did not pick it up. It's neck strain, an orthopedic specialist said as the pain spread to Shipman's spinal column. Try physical therapy, another suggested. When Shipman went to his own hospital a week later, antibiotics still weren't administered for 12 hours.
NEWS
May 21, 1997 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The California Medical Assn. is throwing its weight behind a legislative effort to finance $6 million in research on the therapeutic uses of marijuana and design a distribution system for patients who may need the drug. The announcement is planned for a news conference at the Capitol this morning. The state's biggest doctors group last year opposed Proposition 215, the medical marijuana measure approved by California voters in November. Backers of the bill by state Sen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 1991 | KRISTINA LINDGREN
Seven promising young medical researchers at UC Irvine have been awarded a total of $60,000 in grants to launch their research careers. The recipients were chosen by the Medical Research and Education Society, a UCI support group of prominent Orange County business and medical community leaders, said MRES spokeswoman Kimberly Capwell. The seven, chosen from among 28 candidates, will receive from $7,000 to $11,000 each, depending on their project needs.
HEALTH
December 18, 2000 | BENEDICT CAREY, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Medical news now flies so quickly from the laboratory to our laptops and newspapers that one prestigious medical journal has decided it's time to apply the brakes. In an editorial published last week in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. (JAMA), the journal warned authors who submit papers not to talk to reporters about their work in any detail before it's published. The editorial, co-authored by Dr.
OPINION
April 2, 2013 | By Jessica Wapner
It would be fair to say that Patient 5 owes his life to medical research. Also known as David Aponte, he was the headlining success story from a recent clinical trial at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. The trial tested a new approach - in which a portion of the immune system is genetically altered and then reintroduced to the body - for treating an otherwise fatal leukemia. But when we celebrate the remarkable achievement made possible by the doctors behind the experimental treatment and the patients who volunteered themselves for research, there are two other guests of honor to include at the party: years and years of basic science, and the public dollars that funded them.
OPINION
January 25, 2013
For a muscular agency that combats vicious drug criminals, the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration acts like a terrified and obstinate toddler when it comes to basic science. For years, the DEA and the National Institute for Drug Abuse have made it all but impossible to develop a robust body of research on the medical uses of marijuana. A pro-marijuana group lost its legal battle this week when a federal appellate court ruled that marijuana would remain a Schedule I drug, defined as having no accepted medical value and a high potential for abuse.
HEALTH
April 15, 2002 | JANE E. ALLEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Definitive though it may have sounded, the recent federal study of St. John's wort still hasn't answered all the questions about the herb's effectiveness in treating depression. Researchers reported last week that the herb failed to alleviate moderately severe cases of the illness, which can interfere with work, sleep, eating habits and personal relationships.
HEALTH
December 18, 2000 | BENEDICT CAREY, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Medical news now flies so quickly from the laboratory to our laptops and newspapers that one prestigious medical journal has decided it's time to apply the brakes. In an editorial published last week in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. (JAMA), the journal warned authors who submit papers not to talk to reporters about their work in any detail before it's published. The editorial, co-authored by Dr.
HEALTH
June 19, 2000 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Kids today are flocking to residential summer camps in greater numbers than ever, with an estimated 9 million set to pack their duffel bags this summer. But in the rush to gather up shorts, flashlights and other necessities of camp life, parents may not stop to realize that kids at camp can experience the same kinds of minor illnesses and injuries that occur at home.
NEWS
December 14, 1999 | From Associated Press
Dr. Karl Shipman merely broke his wrist, but it killed him. Bacteria set in during surgery to set his wrist, and a staph infection ultimately raged through his body. The Denver physician's fellow doctors did not pick it up. It's neck strain, an orthopedic specialist said as the pain spread to Shipman's spinal column. Try physical therapy, another suggested. When Shipman went to his own hospital a week later, antibiotics still weren't administered for 12 hours.
NEWS
May 21, 1997 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The California Medical Assn. is throwing its weight behind a legislative effort to finance $6 million in research on the therapeutic uses of marijuana and design a distribution system for patients who may need the drug. The announcement is planned for a news conference at the Capitol this morning. The state's biggest doctors group last year opposed Proposition 215, the medical marijuana measure approved by California voters in November. Backers of the bill by state Sen.
BUSINESS
December 5, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Baxter International Inc. said it agreed to acquire Research Medical Inc. in a stock swap valued at about $236 million. Salt Lake City-based Research Medical makes disposable products for cardiovascular and vascular surgery, and specialty pharmaceuticals. It had revenue of $40 million last year. The agreement values Research Medical at $23.50 a share. Its shares rose $2.77 to $22.77 on the Nasdaq Stock Market.
HEALTH
June 19, 2000 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Kids today are flocking to residential summer camps in greater numbers than ever, with an estimated 9 million set to pack their duffel bags this summer. But in the rush to gather up shorts, flashlights and other necessities of camp life, parents may not stop to realize that kids at camp can experience the same kinds of minor illnesses and injuries that occur at home.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 1989 | KENNETH J. GARCIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
UCLA Medical School, responding to criticism from physicians and AIDS activists over its policy to charge fees to screen patients for experimental AIDS drug studies, has scrapped the billing practice and will offer the services free. Medical school officials Thursday rescinded the longstanding policy of charging a $260 consultation fee for evaluating study candidates after the practice was reported in The Times on Wednesday.
NEWS
October 3, 1995 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
A new study of chimpanzees, the species evolutionarily closest to humans, has provided what scientists are calling the first definitive proof that a high salt intake causes high blood pressure and is thus a risk factor in coronary disease. Although physicians have suspected such a link for centuries, so far the evidence has been indirect, consisting primarily of epidemiological studies in humans and physiological studies in rodents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 1991 | KRISTINA LINDGREN
Seven promising young medical researchers at UC Irvine have been awarded a total of $60,000 in grants to launch their research careers. The recipients were chosen by the Medical Research and Education Society, a UCI support group of prominent Orange County business and medical community leaders, said MRES spokeswoman Kimberly Capwell. The seven, chosen from among 28 candidates, will receive from $7,000 to $11,000 each, depending on their project needs.
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