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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1990 | United Press International
Atty. Gen. John K. Van de Kamp and the California State University system have filed a lawsuit against a Los Angeles-based company that sells research papers to college students, authorities said Thursday. The suit, filed in San Diego Superior Court, said the company, Research Assistance & Student Marketing Service, has violated two sections of the state's Education Code prohibiting sale of term papers that can be submitted for academic credit.
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OPINION
September 27, 2013
Re "U.S., Iran talk of diplomacy, differences," Sept. 25 President Obama has seldom failed to disappoint. He appeared to recognize, a couple of years ago, that an Israeli-Palestinian peace agreement would have to be based on the pre-1967 borders - a plan that made sense to everybody except the Israelis, so he stopped pushing it. At the U.N. on Tuesday, Obama "conceded," as The Times puts it, that "Iranians long have complained of U.S. interference...
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NEWS
March 1, 1989 | BOB SIPCHEN, Times Staff Writer
At age 38, Joel does for a living what students do in their nightmares--he huddles over a computer keyboard in a stuffy little room, pounding out one research paper after another after another. When the work's there--and it usually is--Joel writes several papers a week. In the last 10 years, he figures he has produced thousands of "custom" reports, from undergraduate term papers on "marijuana and sexual desire" to a 150-page graduate thesis on amino acids.
NEWS
September 13, 2012 | By Rosie Mestel
An organic food study by Stanford researchers has caused quite the ruckus. We wondered what the journal that published the article was making of the brouhaha, so we put in a call. We figured that the Annals of Internal Medicine, which generally publishes articles with titles like “The Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome After Antiretroviral Therapy Initiation in Patients With Tuberculosis: Findings From the SAPiT Trial,” is perhaps not accustomed to public reactions like this.
NEWS
November 3, 2011 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
Doctors, researchers, therapists and the general public should reconsider their biases against people with autism, according to a psychiatrist/neuroscientist who studies the disorder. You may not think you are biased against autistics, but you probably are, writes Dr. Laurent Mottron of the University of Montreal in Thursday's edition of the journal Nature . After all, he was too - and he's an expert in the field. Like most people, if he found a difference between autistic people and members of the general population, he assumed the gap represented some sort of defect - even when there was no evidence to suggest that it was. Many of his colleagues continue to think this way, Mottron writes: “For instance, researchers performing functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 1994 | MIMI KO
La Habra High School seniors Meghan Rollins and Melinda Klein, who have been chosen as delegates to the American Junior Academy of Science, will present their research papers on ecology at the academy's national meeting in February. Rollins' research paper investigates the diets of two types of terns at the Bolsa Chica Ecological Reserve in Huntington Beach. It describes the types of fish birds eat and whether their diets are nutritious.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 1986
Your "dropout" editorial (Dec. 28) was but the latest in a series of articles and editorials decrying the sad state of college retention of (mainly) black and Latino students. As usual, no answers to the problem are suggested--only the question of why so many students drop out of college. Without even daring to discuss the complexities of the high school dropout problem, I would like to offer a few words on what happens to those students who, amid fanfare and congratulations, finish high school and go off to college, only to slink back in disgrace a few months or even weeks later, disillusioned and mystified at what overwhelmed them in college.
NEWS
April 20, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times / for the Booster Shots blog
The U.S. government will support publication of two controversial research papers, officials said Thursday. The studies report details of experiments in which the deadly H5N1 influenza virus was engineered to pass between mammals, officials said Thursday. The decision, released via a statement by Dr. Francis Collins , director of the National Institutes of Health, lands three weeks after a U.S. government advisory board that had initially recommended against publication of the two studies changed its position after further consideration.  Members of the National Science Advisory Board for Biosecurity voted unanimously in favor of publishing a manuscript prepared for the journal Nature by Yoshihiro Kawaoka of the University of Wisconsin, Madison.  On a 12 to 6 vote, the group also approved publication of another paper, by Dutch virologist Ron Fouchier, in the journal Science.
SCIENCE
July 9, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
In a long awaited but hardly unanticipated development, two teams of scientists reported Sunday that a strange bacterium called GFAJ-1, once reported to use arsenic instead of phosphorus in its cellular machinery, requires phosphorus to grow after all - just like every other organism on Earth. The microbe “is still a phosphate-dependent bacterium,” one of the research teams wrote in the journal Science. The two groups' research papers may put to rest a debate that began in December 2010 when a group of scientists, including a NASA-affiliated researcher named Felisa Wolfe-Simon, announced a jaw-dropping discovery that a strange bacterium they had discovered in California's Mono Lake seemed to use arsenic in its cellular machinery instead of phosphorus.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 1988 | MARK I. PINSKY, Times Staff Writer
For UC Irvine chemist F. Sherwood Rowland, Tuesday's report documenting depletion of the ozone layer at both poles represents yet another vindication of his pioneering research. "There are a lot of things happening to the atmosphere," Rowland said in an interview with The Times in 1986, "and almost none of them are good."
SCIENCE
July 9, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
In a long awaited but hardly unanticipated development, two teams of scientists reported Sunday that a strange bacterium called GFAJ-1, once reported to use arsenic instead of phosphorus in its cellular machinery, requires phosphorus to grow after all - just like every other organism on Earth. The microbe “is still a phosphate-dependent bacterium,” one of the research teams wrote in the journal Science. The two groups' research papers may put to rest a debate that began in December 2010 when a group of scientists, including a NASA-affiliated researcher named Felisa Wolfe-Simon, announced a jaw-dropping discovery that a strange bacterium they had discovered in California's Mono Lake seemed to use arsenic in its cellular machinery instead of phosphorus.
NEWS
April 20, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times / for the Booster Shots blog
The U.S. government will support publication of two controversial research papers, officials said Thursday. The studies report details of experiments in which the deadly H5N1 influenza virus was engineered to pass between mammals, officials said Thursday. The decision, released via a statement by Dr. Francis Collins , director of the National Institutes of Health, lands three weeks after a U.S. government advisory board that had initially recommended against publication of the two studies changed its position after further consideration.  Members of the National Science Advisory Board for Biosecurity voted unanimously in favor of publishing a manuscript prepared for the journal Nature by Yoshihiro Kawaoka of the University of Wisconsin, Madison.  On a 12 to 6 vote, the group also approved publication of another paper, by Dutch virologist Ron Fouchier, in the journal Science.
SCIENCE
November 5, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
Social psychologist Diederik Stapel made a name for himself by pushing his field into new territory. His research papers appeared to demonstrate that exposure to litter and graffiti makes people more likely to commit small crimes and that being in a messy environment encourages people to buy into racial stereotypes, among other things. But these and other unusual findings are likely to be invalidated. An interim report released last week from an investigative committee at his university in the Netherlands concluded that Stapel blatantly faked data for dozens of papers over several years.
NEWS
November 3, 2011 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
Doctors, researchers, therapists and the general public should reconsider their biases against people with autism, according to a psychiatrist/neuroscientist who studies the disorder. You may not think you are biased against autistics, but you probably are, writes Dr. Laurent Mottron of the University of Montreal in Thursday's edition of the journal Nature . After all, he was too - and he's an expert in the field. Like most people, if he found a difference between autistic people and members of the general population, he assumed the gap represented some sort of defect - even when there was no evidence to suggest that it was. Many of his colleagues continue to think this way, Mottron writes: “For instance, researchers performing functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2009 | Bettina Boxall
As California warms in coming decades, farmers will have less water, the state could lose more than a million acres of cropland and forest fire rates will soar, according to a broad-ranging state report released Wednesday. The document, which officials called the "the ultimate picture to date" of global warming's likely effect on California, consists of 37 research papers that examine an array of issues including water supply, air pollution and property losses.
BUSINESS
November 3, 1999 | MARLA DICKERSON and LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Micro-lending programs reach a "tiny" number of the low-income entrepreneurs they target and are burdened by operational inefficiencies, a three-year USC research project has found. A report on the findings, titled "Microcredit Programs in the U.S.: The Challenges of Outreach and Sustainability," will be presented at a public policy conference in Washington on Friday and published in this month's issue of the Harvard Business Review.
OPINION
September 27, 2013
Re "U.S., Iran talk of diplomacy, differences," Sept. 25 President Obama has seldom failed to disappoint. He appeared to recognize, a couple of years ago, that an Israeli-Palestinian peace agreement would have to be based on the pre-1967 borders - a plan that made sense to everybody except the Israelis, so he stopped pushing it. At the U.N. on Tuesday, Obama "conceded," as The Times puts it, that "Iranians long have complained of U.S. interference...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 1987 | JANNY SCOTT, Times Staff Writer
California medical authorities have filed charges of dishonesty and misrepresentation against Dr. Robert Slutsky, the former UC San Diego heart researcher involved in what officials have said was one of the more extensive academic fraud cases in recent history. The state Board of Medical Quality Assurance announced Monday that it had made the allegations against Slutsky in an accusation--a set of charges to be heard later this year by an administrative law judge.
BUSINESS
February 16, 1999 | LIZ PULLIAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
How much money can you take out of your retirement funds each year and not risk running out of money? Financial planners and academics have debated this subject for years, but real-world data have been scarce. The experts typically used average returns for various investments--stocks, bonds and cash--to argue their points.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 1997 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Students who are not proficient in English make "substantially more rapid progress" toward fluency if they are taught in their native language or if they receive special assistance in English, according to a study of the public schools here made public Wednesday. A much-anticipated study of language programs in Santa Ana Unified School District also found that, on average, achievement of full English fluency can take five to eight years--far longer than most studies have assumed.
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