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Research Project

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 1992 | NONA YATES
An educational way to spend summer vacation time is available by joining a research project, and the Foundation for Field Research has several options. Volunteers are needed on projects ranging from surveying archeological sites on the Zuni Indian Reservation in New Mexico July 21-Aug. 6 to studying elephants in West Africa. No research experience is necessary. Volunteers are taught field methods and contribute physical and tax-deductible financial support.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 2013 | By Tony Barboza
Could Los Angeles prosper without electricity from fossil fuels? Could the city shun water imported from the Sierra Nevada, even as a changing climate brings hotter days and a declining snowpack? Those are some of the questions being tackled by a new research initiative at UCLA that seeks to confront and adapt to climate change at the local level. The project, to be announced Friday, aims to unite more than 60 faculty members from a range of disciplines around an audacious goal: shifting the Los Angeles region to 100% renewable energy and local water by 2050 without harming biodiversity.
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NEWS
July 2, 1994 | DOREEN CARVAJAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the price of almost $1,495, volunteers are paying to save the rain forests of Costa Rica. The work is unglamorous, gritty and occasionally so monotonousness that excitement is watching the trees grow. No matter. If you grow them, they will come. The newest summer crop of paying volunteers is reporting for tree-measuring duty today at the Coto Brus farm of UC Irvine ecology professor Frances Lynn Carpenter.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 2013 | By Rosanna Xia, Doug Smith and Michael Finnegan
Los Angeles officials and the University of California were locked in a standoff Friday over whether the city would receive a list of older concrete buildings that may be at risk of collapse during a major earthquake. The list is considered a crucial first step in any effort by Mayor Eric Garcetti and other city officials to identify vulnerable concrete buildings , which experts say pose the greatest risk of deaths in a huge earthquake. City officials said they requested the data this week from a group of researchers who identified about 1,500 potentially vulnerable concrete buildings in Los Angeles.
NEWS
February 27, 1986 | ROD LAZO, Times Staff Writer
While most of his high school classmates were either lying on the beach or working last summer, 17-year-old Kelvin Wong was in a science lab at California State University, Los Angeles, doing the type of research even a college chemistry student might find difficult. But the South Pasadena High School senior is not an average student. Wong spent more than 400 hours in the lab last summer working to better understand a component of a tranquilizer used to treat schizophrenics.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 1995
Marie Wang, a junior at Tustin High School, will assist doctors in laboratory research at UC Irvine this year. Wang was recently accepted into the Southern California Student Research Consortium and the National Science Foundation Young Scholars Program, which placed her at the university. She will be assisting in a UCI department of pharmacology research project involving the effects of estrogen in producing the hormone melatonin, officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 2013 | By Tony Barboza
Could Los Angeles prosper without electricity from fossil fuels? Could the city shun water imported from the Sierra Nevada, even as a changing climate brings hotter days and a declining snowpack? Those are some of the questions being tackled by a new research initiative at UCLA that seeks to confront and adapt to climate change at the local level. The project, to be announced Friday, aims to unite more than 60 faculty members from a range of disciplines around an audacious goal: shifting the Los Angeles region to 100% renewable energy and local water by 2050 without harming biodiversity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 2011 | By Bettina Boxall, Los Angeles Times
A Gulfstream turboprop sits on the McClellan Airport runway under gray, gloomy skies. Kim Prather has waited two weeks for this day. "I can't believe there are finally clouds," she says gratefully as she and her research team check and calibrate several million dollars' worth of equipment stacked in the plane's cabin. After the plane takes off, it slices through a 9,000-foot-thick layer of storm clouds, zigzagging up the western slope of the Sierra Nevada to probe the mysteries of California's rain and snow.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1991 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Out on the edge of the Pacific, on a patio stretching below the swank Ritz-Carlton hotel, the groom smiled nervously. His bride looked radiant, hair encircled with flowers, wedding dress trailing behind as she stepped slowly down the aisle, father at her side. In most ways, the Saturday fete was like any other wedding. Except one. The bride is paralyzed from the chest down. But she was able to stride delicately across the bricks because of the ingenuity of the man she was marrying.
NEWS
October 18, 1987
A nurse faces disciplinary action after her medical bag, containing two syringes which may have been contaminated with the AIDS virus, was reportedly stolen from her car, University of California at San Francisco officials said. The nurse, Patricia Curran, will be reprimanded for violating rules of a national research project when she left her medical bag unattended in Point Richmond in Contra Costa County.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 2013 | By Rosanna Xia, Doug Smith and Michael Finnegan
Los Angeles officials and the University of California were locked in standoff Friday over whether the city would receive a list of older concrete buildings that may collapse during a major earthquake. The list is considered a crucial first step in any effort by Mayor Eric Garcetti and other city officials to identify vulnerable concrete buildings, which experts say pose the greatest risk of deaths in a huge temblor. IN DEPTH: The dangers of concrete buildings and earthquakes City officials said they requested the data this week from a group of researchers who identified about 1,500 potentially at-risk concrete buildings in L.A. The academics sent a 2012 research paper outlining their studies but declined the city's request to provide the list of buildings, said Jeff Millman, a spokesman for Garcetti.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2013 | By Cristy Lytal, Los Angeles Times
The blockbuster Steven Spielberg movie "Jurassic Park," being re-released in 3-D on April 5, wouldn't be the same place without paleontologist Jack Horner. In addition to advising the production on scientific matters, Horner provided inspiration for the character of Dr. Alan Grant in the original 1993 movie. Universal Pictures is preparing to shoot a fourth installment in the "Jurassic Park" series and will once again tap Horner to serve as an advisor. "It's fun to see a lot of the stuff that I do in there," said Horner, curator of the Museum of the Rockies and professor at the University of Montana.
SCIENCE
September 6, 2012 | By Rosie Mestel
A massive examination of the human genome has revealed that our DNA is  jam-packed with “switches” that regulate the actions of genes  -- turning them on, turning them off, et cetera. The volume of information produced from the effort (called ENCODE) was huge: Ewan Birney, the British scientist who coordinated analysis, estimated that it'd fill a poster 30 kilometers long and 16 meters high, as we note in our story . Birney told us he tried quite hard to get someone to produce the poster,  but nobody bit. The idea somehow evolved into an event offered up by London's Science Museum in which sylph-like women in skin-tight catsuits perform the “Dance of DNA” with aerial silks that are printed with bits of the project's data.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 2012 | By Abby Sewell, Los Angeles Times
Southern California Edison announced Friday that it will collaborate with the Scripps Institution of Oceanography on seismic studies looking at offshore faults near the San Onofre nuclear plant, beginning later this year. Edison requested approval last year from the California Public Utilities Commission to recover $64 million from ratepayers for seismic studies that will help to determine the future of the plant. Caroline McAndrews, Edison's director of nuclear strategic projects, said the collaboration with Scripps will account for about half of that.
BUSINESS
August 28, 2011 | By Kenneth R. Harney
Home energy efficiency and sustainability have been major policy priorities for the Obama administration, but lurking in the background are two consistent questions: Beyond the documentable savings on utility bills, do such steps add to the resale value of a home? And do they make it easier or faster to sell your property? Housing groups and housing officials say that definitive statistical data covering multiple regions of the country are scarce. But some localized research projects in Oregon, Washington and California offer promising hints.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 2011 | By Bettina Boxall, Los Angeles Times
A Gulfstream turboprop sits on the McClellan Airport runway under gray, gloomy skies. Kim Prather has waited two weeks for this day. "I can't believe there are finally clouds," she says gratefully as she and her research team check and calibrate several million dollars' worth of equipment stacked in the plane's cabin. After the plane takes off, it slices through a 9,000-foot-thick layer of storm clouds, zigzagging up the western slope of the Sierra Nevada to probe the mysteries of California's rain and snow.
NEWS
April 25, 1991
The Ralph M. Parsons Foundation has awarded Caltech a $333,000 grant for a research project entitled "How the Gene Regulatory System Transforms an Egg Into an Embryo." Principal researchers will be biology professors Leroy Hood and Eric Davidson.
NATIONAL
April 3, 2011 | By Ken Dilanian, Washington Bureau
The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency has awarded contracts worth $1.8 million over the last two years to a company co-owned by its director and run by her father. The awards were legal and proper, the agency says, because Director Regina Dugan recused herself from any role in DARPA's dealings with the small defense technology firm. Nonetheless, ethics experts said the arrangement raises questions about whether her subordinates could be expected to treat her firm like any other.
NATIONAL
January 28, 2011 | By Raja Abdulrahim
The Muslim population in the United States is projected to more than double in the next 20 years, from 2.6 million to 6.2 million, according to a report by the Pew Research Center's Forum on Religion & Public Life. The estimated increase, which would put Muslims at 1.7% of the U.S. population, would be mainly from continued immigration and high fertility rates, the researchers said. The Pew report , released Thursday, puts the global Muslim population in 2030 at 2.2 billion, about a 35% increase, which would make Muslims more than a quarter of the world's population, slightly higher than the current share.
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